(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Maryland Magazine"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/marymag31univ 



t 



Maryland Room 

UnWefUy of Maryland library 



' 



umni Publication of the University of Maryland 

IVEax" viand 



ma. gazme 




Volume XXXI Number One • November- December 1959 



The Dean's Retreat • Our Distinguished Law Alumni • Meet Your New Alumni O 



FFICERS 



Speaking of Progress - - - 



Progress speaks for itself. 
57,000 members can't be wrong! 





The 

NEW 

SITE 

For 

SAVERS 



Dividends compounded and paid quarterly 



TIieE 



KSTHEDERAL 

in\^\shing-ton 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS VM) LOAN 
ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

Bethesda Branch: 8216 Wisconsin Avenue 
OL. 6-3923 



— Home Office — 

610 13th Street, N.W. Washington 5, D. C. 

Dl. 7-2370 



M:i r> 1; UK I 




Cover: I h i^ is a picture ol a world stilled bj an insulating blanket >>i snow, 
where sounds are sorted out and cadi beard separately and distinctly 
boots punching down the powdery stuff; .t whir ol spinning tires: a laugh 
beard from far off; snow spraying off a nearby tree. Perhaps you remembei 
waking to such a morning and standing before your open window to see a 
snow tail which had come during the night like a wondrous blessing over your 
Maryland. 

PHOTOGRAPH in I ORE GROSSM \n 



the 




magazine 

Volume XXXI 



Number 1 



NOVEMBER DECEMBER • 1959 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN. Assistant Secretary 
ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE, Assistant Treasurer 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWINGTUTTLE 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIV ERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 

ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS Ol Fill AlUMNI ASSOCIATION 

HARRY A. BOSWELL JR., '42 President 

MRS. ELIZABETH ROHR SINGLETON, '47, Vice-President 

DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 

OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELAT IONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N. W. 
Baltimore 18 Md. Washington, D. C. 

tHO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue 



FEATURES 



2 
3 
5 
6 

10 

11 

12 
14 
15 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 



NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



25 
26 
30 
33 
39 
43 
45 
48 
50 
51 
51 

57 

58 

64 



The Alumni Diary 

Alumni and Campus Notes 

A Year of Alumni Decision 

The Dean's Retreat 

New Baltimore Properties Acquired 

One Regent Retires; Two Appointed 

Our Distinguished Law Alumni 

Meet Your New Alumni Officers 

Engineering Teachers Complete Doctoral Work Under White Plan 

Fund Tops $200,000 in October 

Dr. Livingston Honored as "Distinguished Alumnus" 

Is He Over? 

13 Varsity Candidates Report to Millikan 

1958-1959 Sports Year— Part II 



Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Dentistry 

Engineering 

Law 

Medicine 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

University College 



Social Notes 



Completed Careers 



Directory of Advertisers 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 



I III (il M K \l \l I MM ( lit M || 

S( IIOOI i\/» ( i)l I I (.1 
HI /'HI \l \ 1 I//I / s 

kOtll I I II K I 

Paul M Galbreath, '39 
Vrthui B Hamilton, '2') 
( layton Rej nolds, '22 

w Gilbert Dent, Jr., 2'. 
( harlea I I Dinger, '37 
Mi Reginald V. Truitt, 'N 

BUS I NBSS J i- 1 ii I I i ADM IN ISTKATIOh 

Harry A Boswell, Jr., '42 

K..lph W Frey, Jr., '4 1 
( bester w. I awney, '3 l 

III S I I s I K 1 

Dr. Samuel Bryant, '32 
I) i Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Eugene I). I. yon, '38 

ED II I V I Ion 

( i Watson Algire, '30 
( lara Dixon. '34 
Harry Hasslinger, '33 

BNGINHHBINO 

I mmeit I oane. '29 

Dudlej D. Taylor, '51 
Arthur (i. VanReuth, '34 

MOMl BCONOMICfl 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '31 
Mrs i rna R. Chapman, '34 

Mis Amies MeNutt-Krieker. '31 

I \ \s 

Mary Arabian, '44 

I ayman J. Redden, '34 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINB 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams. '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno. '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 
m u K s i n a 

Mrs. Dorothy K. Herbert, '24 

Mrs. Norma S. Long. '49 

Mrs Elizabeth R. Singleton, '47 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 
• 
/ V OFFH 10 MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David I . Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Victor Holm, '57, Ass't Secretary 
I rank Block, '24, Past President 
loseph H. Deckman, '31. Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast. '33, Past President 
J. Homer Rcmsberg. '18. Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders. 10. Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein. "12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons. '2'). Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell. '10. Past President 

• 
ill MM CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore— David W. Bicn. '20 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggeit. '30 
Cecil County— Francis X. Chapman, '50 
Cumberland — Rcford Aldridge. '25 
I astern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick Counts — 

James F. Zimmerman. '37 
M Club — George Kneplex . '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall. '31 
New England — George Keilei/a. '2^ 
New York— Harold McGay, '50 
North Eastern Shore — 

Robert W. Downes, Jr., '4(. 
Overseas— Col. Ralph I Williams. '33, '4 1 
Pittsburgh Dr. loseph I inegold, '34 
Prince Georges County- 
Egbert F. Tinglev. "27 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady Club — 

Mrs lanice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W Stevens, '19 
i S Depi Dt Agriculture — 

William H Evans, 76 
Washington Countv — 

Harry F. Vollmer. III. '40 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



ANnllll K year and in some ways a Iresh start is just around the corner. 
Perhaps it is well that this is so. for at this period of the year the look ahead 
and the anticipation oi new hopes is quite often more attractive than the backward 
look. Such is the case as we reach lor new inspiration in a struggle to achieve for 
others as well as lor ourselves. I his would be a tragic time of the year were it 
not for the new challenge which all of us find in an old story. 

\s a boy, 1 was told the story of Christmas and the significance which it holds 
Idi main around the globe. Now it is my turn to wish young and old alike the 
best and most significant Holiday Season each has ever enjoyed. At the same time. 
I can recall the wiping of the slate as the past was lost in preparation for the nev* 
With each approaching year there comes to mind a little poem. The author is 
lost to me. Perhaps it will have the same meaning for you as we combine wishes 
for both Christmas and the New Year. 

"He came to my desk with quivering lip — 

The lesson was done. 
Dear Teacher. I want a new leal.' he said. 

I've spoiled this one.' " 
"I took the old leaf, stained and blotted. 

And gave him a new one, all unspotted. 
And into his sad eyes smiled, 

'Do better, now, my child.' " 

How sincerely I trust that the forthcoming year may be good to you and even 
better for our Alumni Association. Perhaps the challenge will be found in the 
portrait of Joan d'Arc presented by the "Depression" class of 1932 displayed on 
the wall opposite my desk. Again it may be in the life story of a fellow alumnus 
who for half a century was a country doctor, a community friend and our family 
physician. The numbing news of his tragic death came swiftly and unexpected!) 
only a few short months after he had been honored by the Governor, his commu- 
nity and national officials for his devotion to his fellow man. Only the suddenne^- 
with which the past can end could make the present and the future so vital and 
significant. Now life is in focus, every day becomes important. Pages that are da>s 
in a bright new year are ready for turning. 

Yes, Christmas is a wonderful time. We send our wishes, hearty and new in 
the same old way. We turn in a tired and worn year for a fresh, new start. As we 
think together, hope together and pray together, we shall perhaps find u easy to 
pick up the thread ot the old poem as it concludes. 

"/ went to the throne with quivering soul — 

The old year was done. 
'Dear lather, hast Thou a new leaf for me.' 

I've spoiled this one.' " 
"He took the old leaf, stained and blotted. 

And gave me a new one all unspoiled. 
And into my sad heart smiled. 
'Do belter, now. my child.' " 

As time-worn as it may sound we repeat the age-old greeting. Merry Christmas 
to all and may the light oi the New Year shine ever bright upon you and \ours 



As ever, 



u 



ifrrt-^ 



David L. Brigham 

Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazim 





Introducing Members 
of the 1959-60 Alumni Council 



The ladies and gentlemen pictured above are members 
of the Alumni Council, governing body of our Alumni 
Association. Seated left to right are Joseph H. Deckman, '31, 
Past President; Miss Mary Arabian, '44, President, School of 
Law Alumni; Frank Block, '24, Immediate Past President; Dr. 
William H. Triplett, '11, Representative of the School of 
Medicine and current Vice President; Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr 
Singleton, '47, Representative of the School of Nursing and 
current Vice President; Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42, Represen- 
tative of the College of Business & Public Administration 
and current President; David L. Brigham, '38, Secretary- 
Treasurer; Judge J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President; 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12, Past President; and Dr. Frank 
Bentz, Assistant in the University's Office of the President, and 

■ a guest of the Council at this meeting. 

Standing members include representatives of schools, col- 
leges, and alumni clubs: William H. Evans, '26, U.S.D.A.; 

' Dr. Samuel Bryant, '32, Dental School; Dr. Thurston A. 
Adams, '34, Medical School; Mrs. Agnes McNutt-Kricker, 

November-December, 1959 



'31, Home Economics; Ben Dyer, '31. Engineering; Thomas E. 
Bourne, Jr., '43; Business and Public Administration; Egbert 
F. Tingley, '27, Prince Georges County; Frank J. Slama. '24, 
Pharmacy; Francis X. Chapman, '50, Cecil County; Arthur 
B. Hamilton, '29, Agriculture; Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49, 
Nursing School; Dudley D. Taylor. '51, Engineering; Mrs. 
Kathryn P. Donnelly, '48. Nursing; Mrs. Geraldine P. 
Edwards, '31, Home Economics; Judge Ralph G. Shure, 
Montgomery County; Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34, Home 
Economics; Harry E. Hasslinger, '33, Education; Mrs. Miriam 
L. Beall, '31, Home Economics; Hyman Davidov, '20. 
Pharmacy School; Miss Clara M. Dixon, '34, Education; Dr. 
Harry Levin, '26, Dental School; Samuel I. Raichlen, '25, 
Pharmacy School: Charles H. R. Merrick, '26, Arts & Sciences; 
Clayton Reynolds. '22. Agriculture; James W. Stevens, '19, 
Terrapin; Chester W. Tawney, '31, Business & Public Admin- 
istration; G. Watson Algire, '30, Education; Layman J. 
Redden, '34, Law School; David Bien, '29, Baltimore Club, 
and Robert W. Downes, Jr.. '46. North Eastern Shore. 



I 



m Club Aw uids Banqi i i 

President oi the "M" Club, Hotoj ai 
perstein, appointed Messrs. Lawrence 
Smallwood and C. Robert Boucher ;is 
( n ( hairmen for the Ninth Annual 
\i ( lub Banquet. The affair will be 
held on December 5 at the Statler-Hilton 
Hotel in Washington, I). ( ., starting at 
7-.M) p.m. Other club members who 
will serve on the banquet committee 
are: Jay Phillips, Charles Beebe, Joseph 
Deckman, James Kehoe, Kenneth Mas- 
kell, George Knepley, Charles Herbert 
and I larvej Simms. 

General Bernard A. Schriever, Chief 

ol \ir Force Air Research and Develop- 
ment Command, has been selected to 
receive the Club's highest annual award, 
the "Distinguished Service Award."' 

Honorary "M" Awards will be given 
to Richard E. Kocster. past Terrapin 
Club President and present President of 
Kocster Bakery in Baltimore; Robert 
Campbell, University Swimming Coach, 
and Edward R. C'arr, one of Washing- 
ton's leading business and civic leaders; 
David L. Brigham, Director. Office of 
Alumni Relations; and Gen. Schriever. 

Recipients of the Charles P. McCor- 
mick award, the Talbot T. Specr award 
and the A. V. Williams award also will 
be announced at a later date. 

An integral part of the program will 
lie the presentation and the induction 
of the new members into the "Maryland 
State Hall oi Fame." Governor Tawes 
is Honorary Chairman of the Selection 
Committee. 

Other awards to be given at the ban- 
quet will be the All- American awards. 
Jim Tatum Memorial Award, ami the 
Atlantic (oast Conference Award. 

Jimmy Gibbons, well-known T.V. and 
radio personality and the Voice of the 
Washington Redskins, will be the 
I oastmaster. 

Monsignor (Maj. Gen. Retired) Pat- 
rick J. Ryan will give the Invocation and 
Benediction. 



R\i rii Ci. Sin ki 
Named Cum uit Jt dgi 

Judge Ralph G. Shine ot the (lass 
ol I l > s 2 has been named to the Cir- 
cuit Court, Court House. Rockville. 
I he new Judge represents the Sixth 
ludicial Circuit and is a Past President 




mm iimoki hub officers and Program Committee members lay the ground work tor 
their January 21) Charter Day Commemorative Banquet. Sealed left to ri^ht are J 
W. Stevens. '19; Charles F. Ellinger, '37; Committee Chairman Samuel A. Goldstein, '30; 
David I.. Brigham, '38; President David It', Bien, '2V: Co-Chairman Florence Kav 
McKinney, '36; Alumni Association Vice-President and Club Secretary Dr. William II 
Triplet/, 'II; and John l.ampe. '50. 



MARYLAND BOOKS AND AUTHORS 

THE EDITORS WISH K) ANNOUNCE A NEW REGULAR FEATURE FOR 
The Maryland Magazine which will commence with the January- 
February issue. This is Maryland Books and Authors, a review ol 
books authored by alumni and faculty and books written bv persons 
outside of the University Community but whose texts deal with the 
University or the State. 

At present, the Book Review Editor is compiling a list of books 
written by alumni and faculty. I his is an invitation to you to inform 
the Review Editor ol books currcnllv being written, soon-to-be- pub- 
lished, or published. 

All memoranda and materials should be sent to Mis. Harold Haves. 
Head, Maryland and Rare Books Department. McKeldin Library, 
University oi Maryland at College Park. Mrs. Haves will act as Book 
Review Editor. 




.11 IK. I sill Ki 



of the Montgomery County Bar Asso- 
ciation and the University M Club. He 
is a former member of the Hous< 
Delegates, a former Trial Magistr; 
Past President of the University's Arts 
and Sciences Alumni Chapter and at 
the present time is serving as President 
oi the Montgomery, Count) Alumni 
Club. 

In addition to those organizations 
which he has headed. Judge Shu re is a 
member ol Delta Sigma Phi. the Mary- 
land State Bar Association and the Pa 
rapin Club. During World War II he 
served as a Lieutenant in the U. S. Navj 
in both the Atlantic and Pacific Thea- 
tres. His Law degree is from George- 
town in 1936. The Judge is married 
and has two children. 

i Continut d on page 21 ) 



the Maryland Magazine 



A Year of Alumni 
Decision 

President Boswell Calls for Greater 
Alumni Interest and Participation 



This is a year of decision, in fact of two decisions — both con- 
cerning you. First, we want you to help us decide what programs 
the Alumni Association should undertake. Second, we would like you 
to indicate any way in which you would be willing to serve actively. 

My ambition as your President is to see our alumni, individually and 
as an organization, render a maximum service to the University of 
Maryland. We hope to improve communications between our Associa- 
tion, the alumni and the University. In addition we want every alumnus 
to have the opportunity to render assistance in the specific area of 
interest which concerns him most. 

The Alumni Association has a long history of service to the State 
and Nation of which every alumnus of the University can be justly 
proud. There is every reason that this pride in our alumni and in the 
University should continue to grow. We hope to be able to supply 
each alumnus with information which will enable him to tell this story 
of our tradition of progress and of our hopes for the days ahead. The 
effectiveness with which we are able to accomplish rests in large 
measure with the decisions of direction and assistance which you make 
for us. We anticipate an expression of your interest by letter or card 
so the year ahead may be one of constructive action as well as decision. 



BIOGRAPHIES OF NEW ALUMNI OFFICERS ARE LOCATED 
ON PAGES 14 AND 15. 



November-December, 1959 













The Dean's Retreat 

In a Pastoral Setting, Students, Faculty and Administrative Personnel 
Examine Together the Tensions and Responsibility of University Life 

Photographs by Al Danegger 



THE SETTING IS A WOODLAND CAMP. BLUE SKY, 
a quiet river, and tall trees frame an open field. A small 
boat tied to a pier rocks serenely across a pattern of 
miniature waves. Woods wearing summer green move rest- 
lessly under the cool air of approaching autumn. 

The Executive Dean for Student Life reclines on a green 
lawn, cigarette in hand, and faces a small group oi the campus' 
leading students. He talks easily about the honor system, 
developing his thesis, responding courteously to questions 
and occasionally parrying a rather well-aimed thrust. 

Nearby the Episcopal Chaplain, normally seen in clerical 
garb, stands with his hand in his blue jeans, talking with two 
youths from Western Maryland, a professor of chemistry. 
and the Manager of the Student Union. 

Such scenes were typical oi the "Dean's Retreat," named 
for its originator. Mr. B. James Borreson, Executive Dean for 
Student Life. The site was Camp Letts, owned b\ the Young 
Men's Christian Association, and located on Rhode River near 
Annapolis. More than 100 persons worked together and 
played together September 10 and II in this second annual 
retreat from the complexities and problems oi the Universit) 
life. 

Representatives of the student body, the faculty, and the 
administration came together to examine and evaluate the 
factors which compose their collective life. It was the one 
tune during the academic year when close contact and inter- 
change among these three major groups comprising the Uni- 
versitj communin was possible. 



the Mar vi and Magazine! 



It the alumnus reading this article will pause foi a moment 
to recall his own student days, be ma) remember the hurrying 
madness known as registration when he saw his advisor only 
long enough to obtain his signature on two or three cards; 
classes meant the race across campus to make an S o'clock, 
pausing for the 50-minute lecture, and then oil again to some 
other part of the campus tor the next lecture. Innumerable 
"must" activities and the avalanche of books and their required 
study made slim any chance of real personal contact with 
any of the teaching stall'. The administration remained a group 
set apart to be read about only in the pages of the Diamond- 
back. 



IN A UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY WHICH IS CONCERNED 
with the education of a very large number of people, 
it is especially necessary that the worth and importance of 
the individual not be submerged. The responsibilities of each 
of the members making up the community grow as the univer- 
sii\ grows, isolating him to a degree from the activities car- 
ried on by another group on another part of the campus. The 
Dean's Retreat" is an attempt to impregnate this atmosphere 
of "impersonal co-existence" with the warmth of human 
contact and relationships. 

This second conference (the first was held last year) adopt- 
ed the theme "Areas of Tension on the Campus." We asked 
Dean Borreson why this theme was chosen, and he explained: 

"Tensions are an inherent part of life on a campus the size 
of this one — they are built into the system: tensions between 
faculty and students, students and administration, students 
and students, faculty and administration. They come about 
because face-to-face contact with each and every person is 
not possible. Conflict, too, is inevitable. Some conflict often 
brings about improved conditions, but unfortunately conflict is 
sometimes nonproductive. The key to unlocking tensions and 
resolving conflicts is bringing people together for face-to-face 
interchange in an atmosphere where the perspectives of the 
different groups can be presented and discussed with respect 
to the identified areas of tension on the campus. These discus- 
sions bring about increased insight into existing tensions and 
provide the participants with the tools for dealing effectively 
with them." 

The participants of this year's conference included under- 
graduate student leaders such as Bob Yellowlees, President of 
the Student Government Association, and Harriet Husted, 
President of the Associated Women Students. Other student 
leaders represented student publications; members of Mortar 
Board and Omicron Delta Kappa participated; the religious 
groups, Panhellenic and Interfraternity Council were repre- 
sented, in all, a total of about 50 students. Faculty residents 
(graduate students who act as counselors in the men's dormi- 
tories) and members of the faculty and the administration 
totalled another 50. 

From Thursday morning to Friday noon the participants 
joined together in a casual and relaxed atmosphere which 
fostered a free exchange of ideas about the topics under dis- 
cussion. A social program was also arranged which included 
square dancing and community singing. To Miss Julia 
Billings, Assistant Dean of Women, goes much of the credit 
for program arrangements. 

According to Miss Billings, the program was oriented to- 
ward gaining an understanding of the types of problems that 
exist on the campus and their solutions. An important part 
of all the discussions was the discovery of the different points 
of view which existed in relation to a single problem. Students, 



' 







j November-December, 1959 







The Dean's Retreat 



c ontinued 



factllt) and administrators tell tree to point out the aspect 
of a problem which were of deepest concern to them in theii 
particular capacity. The success oi the conference grew maintj 
out oi this uninhibited airing of opinions. 



SESSIONS Ol I HI CONFERENCE BEGAN \s 1 1 H \l I PAB 
ticipants getting together tor a general meeting, some ol 
which subsequently broke up into small discussion groups 
There were five general sessions during the two-dav retreat 
Topics considered were: 1 ) honor system; 2) communication; 
media: 3) drinking problem: 4) retaining freshman enthu 
siasm; 5) dormitory-Greek relations: 6) taculty-student rela- 
tions: 7) building respect tor academic achievement: 8) valid 
ity of grades as a standard of achievement; 9) academic 
emphasis versus organizations, activities: 10) organizations — 
aims purposes, goals programs: keeping them from becoming 
lazy. 

There was also a session which centered around the stud\ 
oi a hypothetical situation on an un-named campus. I he par- 



T 





1 




ticipunts were asked to make decisions regarding the satisfac- 
tory solution of the situation. 

The concluding meeting heard two addresses. Bob Yellow - 
lees spoke on "Student Government — Its Structure, Programs 
and Goals." 

Dean Borreson took a "I ong I ook Ahead" into the grow- 
ing complexity of ten years' growth on an already large 
campus. He spoke of the future in terms of the University's 
physical facilities and the ever-increasing campus population. 
Of basic concern is the problem of the individual suddenly 
finding himself one among thousands oi people who have 
little concern for him. Dean Borreson referred to "islands of 
individuality," home bases from which the student might 
proceed to the whole campus. 

The results of the "Deans Retreat" are difficult to express 
in concrete terms. They are intangible and defy absolute 
definition. One may say "renewed respect," "inspiration," 
"greater insight." and much more without saying everything. 
One may also point to the solid achievement of last year's 
retreat as a marker for the future, for out of that conference 
grew the entirely re-vamped Freshman Orientation Program 
ol this year. 

However it may be expressed, the "Dean's Retreat" is the 
beginning of a system of bridges built across the existing gaps 
of University life. Just as new sidewalks now bridge "Maryland 
mud." so do these new bridges advance communication, 
understanding and then, performance. 













to**** 



BALTIMORE CAMPUS 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1. UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL UH 

2 PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE PI 

3. MEDICAL BUILDING (DAVIDGE HALL) DVH 

4 BRESSLER RESEARCH BUILDING BR.B 

5 SCHOOL OF LAW SL 

6 GRAY LABORAIORY GL 

7 MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY BUILDING MTB 

8 ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AB 

9 SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY SD 
10 DENTAL CLINIC OC 



11 NURSES RESIDENCE NR 

12 SCHOOL OF NURSING (WHITEHURST HALL) WH 

13 SCHOOL OF PHARMACY (DUNNING HALL) DH 
KELLY MEMORIAL KM 
MEDICAL SCIENCES LIBRARY MSL 
OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT OPD 
PLANNED UNION DORMITORY UD 
PLANNED FACILITY FOR ADMINISTRATION. BASIC 

SCIENCES AND PHYSICAL PLANT 
PARKING GARAGE 



14 
15. 

16 
17. 

18 

19 






A u\i tiMORE campus as it looks today. Tlw newly-acquired properties are located in the upper left and are numbered 18 and /V 
uho the completed appearance of the Medical Sciences Library, number 15, and the almost completed Union-Dormitory, number, 

New Baltimore Properties Acquired 



Tin: PURCHASE FOR $1,700,000 OF the build- 
mgs in the 600 block of West Baltimore Street and the 
700 block of West Redwood Street, commonly referred 
to as "the Hecht properties." opens a period of redevelopment 
and growth on the Baltimore campus. 

The new Iv -acquired properties will provide approximately 
256,000 square feet of floor space for use bj administrative 
and service personnel and by the basic science departments 
in medicine. 

The properties consist oi the new and old Hecht buildings 
(actual!) considered one building in terms of use). 196. 000 
and 60,000 square feet respective!) ; an elevated parking garage 
(capacity 335 automobiles). I 10. 000 square feet: and two 
small warehouse-type buildings. The properties are situated 
over 2. 1 acres. 

I he I Diversity acquired these properties when the Hecht 
and Ma) corporations merged and the new organization 
decided to discontinue store operations in the area. 

I he properties are of value to the University because. 

• the basic science departments serving the School of 
Medicine are located in overcrowded quarters in three sepa- 



rate buildings and require additional space: 

• maintenance, custodial and receiving units are scattered 
in at least six buildings owned by the University and in I 
number o\ rented properties; the moving of administrative, 
custodial and basic science units to the Hecht building will 
permit centralization of these activities and will free addi- 
tional space in the University Hospital and in various buildings 
now used by the School o\ Medicine. The space thus freed 
will be used for research and Hospital purposes, thereb) 
meeting some oi the manv needs oi the School ol Medicine. 

• a great need for parking facilities existed. No Universit) 
parking was available for part-time and visiting physicians, 
or instructors, patients, students, or employees. 

• location on the western boundary oi the proposed campus 
redevelopment area made acquisition of the properties 
important to the future development oi the campus. 

The Universitv is presentl) engaged in preparing detailed 
plans for the renovation and use of the buildings. Funds for 
the renovation are being requested in the 1 1 >60-6 1 Capital 
Improvements Budget Major renovation construction is 
expected to begin about July 1. 



w 



the Maryland Magazine 




I.dniiind S. Burke who served nini ii\ks <>\ mi board oi 
Regents, resigned Juno 30. 

At the meeting of the Board iii May. Mr. Burke was presented a silvei 
plate commemorating his service. Engraved on the plate was the signature 

ot each member of the Board representing a token of the esteem which each 
held for Mr. Burke. Mr. Charles P. McCormick, Chairman oi the Board, 
speaking on behalf of all its members thanked Mr. Buikc lor his verj fin< 
service and invited him to return at any time to \isit with them. Mr. Burke 
expressed the genuine meaning that his service with the Board had had loi 
him. 

Earlier, the Corps of Cadets had given a special salute to Mr. Burke 
during the AFROTC program. The citation said in part: "Mr. Burke's resig- 
nation from the Board of Regents will he felt deeply. We congratulate the 
University for its good fortune in having had his services. To Mr. Burke. 
we extend our sincere wishes for future health and happiness.'' 

Mr. Burke expects to retire to his farm in Connecticut. 



One Regent Retires; Two Appointed 




Mrs. John L. Whitehurst has received her second appoint- 

ment to the Board. Mrs. Whitehurst previously served 22 years with the 
Board in the capacities of Secretary, Vice Chairman of the Board, and 
Chairman of the budget, hospital, and medical school and nursing school 
committees. 

She is a nationally known civic leader and clubwoman. She has been 
President of the General Federation of Women's Clubs and a Regional 
Director for the Association of Governing Boards of State Universities and 
Allied Instruction. She served in an advisory capacity on 31 national boards 
between 1941 and 1944. 

Widely travelled, Mrs. Whitehurst visited Great Britain, Mexico, Cuba 
and the Dominican Republic during World War II as guest of these 
governments. 

She represented the United States at the World Health Organization in 
Geneva, Switzerland in 1950, by appointment of the President of the United 
States and was later sent by the government to England to study civil defense. 

Mrs. Whitehurst is an expert an reciprocal trade agreements, parliamentary 
law, public speaking and Americanism. She has lectured throughout the 
United States and in many foreign countries. 




Judge William C. Walsh is the newest member of the uni- 

versity's Board of Regents. Long active in legal, civic and business affairs 
of the State, Judge Walsh brings to his new post a wealth of experience in 
responsible leadership. 

Born in Cumberland, he was educated at Mount Saint Mary's College, 
Emmitsburg, and obtained his LL.B. degree from Catholic University Law 
School. An LL.D. degree was awarded him in 1930 by Mount Saint Mary's 
College. 

Judge Walsh served with the Maryland National Guard on the Mexican 
border in the summer of 1916 and was in France during World War I, 
serving as a First Lieutenant. 

Admitted to practice law in Maryland in 1913, Mr. Walsh became City 
Attorney of Cumberland in 1920. He was Associate Judge of the Fourth 
Judicial Circuit of Maryland in 1921 and from 1924 to 1926 was Chief 
Judge of the Fourth Judicial Circuit. From 1931-1935 he was State Insur- 
ance Commissioner of Maryland. He was elected Attorney General of Mary- 
land in 1938 for a four-year term and was re-elected in 1942. In 1945 he 
resigned to devote his entire time to private practice. He is a member of 
the law firm of Miles, Walsh & Stockbridge. 



November-December, 1959 



11 



Our Distinguished Law Alumni 

Recent Appointments and Elections to the State Bench, 

Bar and Administration 



( lODl Kl \ C HI I I) 

G(ll)| Kl ■> ( mi I). I 1 ,B. '17. HAS m 1 s 
appointed Judge in Pocomoke 
City, Maryland, the atv in which he 
h.is practiced law continuously since 
1920. 

Judge Child was horn in Stockton, 
Maryland, in I «s i M. He holds an A.M. 
degree from St. Johns College. Annap- 
olis. Serving in World War I. he 
achieved the rank of Captain; in 1923 
he organized a National Guard company 
in Pocomoke City and served in the 
Maryland National Guard for ten years. 

Judge Child served eight years as 
State's Attorney for Worcester County; 
he is a Past President oi the Worcester 
County Bar Association and Past Vice 
President of the Maryland State Bar 
Association. He is a member of the 
Pittscreek Preshyterian Church, Poco- 
moke City; a 32nd Degree Mason and 
member of Boumi Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine; he is a Past President of Poco- 
moke Rotary Club and a member of 
Pocomoke City Klks Club. 

Married in 1924 to Louise Byrd of 
Pocomoke City, they have two children. 
Godfrey B. Child, a graduate of the 
University of Maryland, and Mary Alice 
Child, a graduate of Duke University. 



J. Gil. BURT PRENDERGAST 

J(,ll HI Kl I'KI M)l K(, VM. I I .H. '33. 
. has recently assumed new duties 
as Judge on the Supreme Bench oi Bal- 
timore City. Mr. Prendergasl was for 
years in private practice as a member 



ol the law firm ol ( lark. Smith & 

Prendergast 

He saw action in World War II with 
the Navy, serving as a Lieutenant Mosl 
of the period from 1943 to 1946 he 
spent in the Pacific where he received 
the Presidential Unit Citation. 

Judge Prendergast is a Eel low ol the 
American College ol Trial Lawyers, a 
member of the American. Maryland and 
Baltimore City Bar Associations He has 
been Vice President of the Maryland 
Bar Association and a Past President of 
the Alumni Council. 

He and his wife have four children. 
The oldest boy entered the University 
oi Maryland Medical School this year. 



O. Bowie Duckett 

O BOWIE DUCKETT, 1 I .B. '28. NOW 
. serves as Judge in the Fifth Judi- 
cial Circuit. Anne Arundel County. 
Judge Duckett is also a graduate of the 
Judge Advocate School. University ol 
Michigan. 

He is a native of Anne Arundel 
County, born there in 1903. Admitted 
to the Maryland Bar in 1928. Duckett 
has practiced law for more than 25 
years with extensive trial experience 
before numerous courts and boards. In 
1950 he was appointed Special Assist- 
ant Attorney General to organize and 
administer the law against communists 
and subversives. His lair and efficient 
administration oi this difficult task 
brought him state-wide recognition. 

Duckett was commissioned a Captain 



in the Army during World War II and 
saw action in the New Guinea campaign 
and the Philippine invasion. 

He is a member of the American. 
Maryland, and Anne Arundel County 
Bar Associations. He is a former Pres- 
ident of the Southern Maryland Society 
and of the Housing Association ol An- 
napolis and Anne Arundel County. 



James J. Lindsay 

A 1922 GRADl Ml 01 111! I NIVI RSm 
of Maryland School of Law. James 
J. Lindsay is now Judge in the Circuit 
Court for Baltimore County. 

Judge Lindsay served with the United 
States Navy in World War 1. being dis- 
charged with the rank of Ensign. I 
lowing his military service he entered 
the Law School in 1919 and was admit- 
ted to the Bar in October 1921. 

He was elected to the Maryland Leg- 
islature as a member of the House ol 
Delegates in 1924 and served continu- 
ously until 1933. during which time he 
served as Democratic Floor Leader. In 
1938 he was elected to the Senate of 
Maryland from Baltimore County and 
served in the 1939. 1941. 1943. and 
1945 sessions. He was Majority Moor 
Leader in the 1943 session of the Senate 
and President oi the Senate during the 
session oi 1945 and special session ol 
I 946. 

Judge 1 indsay practiced law in Balti- 
more City and Baltimore County until 
his appointment to the bench earlier 
this year. 



ii IK. I C Mil I) 




.11 IK.I 1>KI NDI KCVSl 



Jl IK.I IHIK1 1 I 







\ 




Harrison L. Winti r 

HUUUSON 1 . WIN I IK. I 1 i< '44, is 
the (its Solicitor lor Baltimore. 
Mr. Wintei brings lo the post .i back- 
ground ol extensive experience in Mar) 
[and law. 

He was employed .is a Mil dial tor 
in the Department of Legislative Refer- 
ence during the l l »45 and 1 447 sessions 
Ol the General Assembly. In 1946 he 
entered private practice as an associate 
of the law firm of Miles. Walsh, O'Brien 
& Morris. That year he was also ap- 
pointed an Assistant Attorney Cieneral 
and served in that capacity until 1951. 
During that time he prepared and ar- 
gued cases m the trial courts of Mary- 
land, the Court of Appeals of Maryland 
and the United States Supreme Court. 
I pon his resignation as Assistant Attor- 
nc\ General, Mr. Winter became a part- 
ner in the law firm which later became 
Miles cv. Stockbridge. In the period 1954- 
1955 he served as Deputy Attorney 
General of Maryland. 

Mr. Winter is a member of the Bal- 
timore City, Maryland State and Amer- 
ican Bar Associations. He is also active 
in civic and church affairs. He served 
for one year as instructor in the Uni- 
versity Law School where he taught a 
course in contracts. He is presently a 
trustee of Roland Park Country School 
and a member of the Committee on 
Canons of the Protestant Episcopal Dio- 
cese of Maryland. 

Mr. Winter is married and has two 
daughters. 



J. 



J. Harold Grady 

HAROLD GRADY, MAYOR OF BALTI- 

more, is a 1942 graduate of the 
School of Law. He is also a graduate 
of Loyola College in Baltimore, where 
he earned a B.A. degree, magna cum 
laude. 

He served with the FBI four years, 
receiving a commendation from J. 
Edgar Hoover during that time. In 1946, 
Mr. Grady began the private practice 
of law in Baltimore. In 1947, he was 



appointed Assistant state's Attorney. He 

spent 12 years in the Stale's \lloinc\s' 

Office, becoming Deput) State's Attor- 
ney in 1955 and Stale's Altoincv in 
1956. 
Mr. Grady has served as President 

of the Slate's Attorneys' Association ol 
Maryland and as a Director of the Na- 
tional Association of Prosecuting Attor- 
ney. He is also a member of many civic 
and fraternal organizations. He has been 
a law school instructor both at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and at the ML Ver- 
non Schools of Law. He has served on 
the Executive Committee of the Alumni 
Association of the University of Mary- 
land Law School. 

Mr. Grady lives in the Northwood 
section of Baltimore with his wife and 
their four children. 

George M. Berry 

JUDGE GEORGE M. BERRY, '32, WAS Ap- 
pointed July 1, 1959, as Associate 
Judge of the Third Judicial Circuit of 
Maryland. 

Born September 4, 1907, in Luther- 
ville, Baltimore County, Judge Berry 
still resides there. His roots go deep 
into the life of the county, for he prac- 
ticed law in Towson continuously since 
his admission to the Bar on November 
15, 1932, until his recent appointment. 
He was educated in the public schools 
of the county, graduating from Towson 
High School in 1924. He continued his 
education at The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, receiving the Bachelor of Arts 
degree from that institution in 1928. He 
is a 1932 graduate of the University of 
Maryland School of Law. 

In 1940, Judge Berry served as First 
Counsel of the Baltimore County Zon- 
ing Department. He was Counsel to the 
County Commissioners of Baltimore 
County from 1946-1950. From 1955- 
1957, Judge Berry was the Deputy 
County Solicitor for Baltimore County. 

Judge Berry is active in state and 
county Bar Associations and is a past 
president of the Baltimore County Bar 
Association. 



He is also an active member ol the 
I piscopal ( hurch 

Judge Bens is married and the father 

ol two sons. 

Ambrose t. Har i man 

THOUGH si II I IN His EAR1 1 I HIH I II S, 
Ambrose I. Hartman brings to the 

position of Deputy City Solicitoi loi 
Baltimore a background ol considerable 
experience. 

A resident of Baltimore for the past 
13 years, Mr. Hartman was graduated 
with the 1451 Law School class, cum 
laude. While a student he was a member 
of the Student Editorial Board of the 
Maryland Law Review. He was admit- 
ted to the Bar of the Court of Appeals 
of Maryland in 1951 and to the Bar 
of the Supreme Court of the United 
States in 1954. 

Mr. Hartman served as an Assistant 
Attorney General of Maryland for the 
period 1951 to 1955 under Attorneys 
General Hall Hammond, Edward D. E. 
Rollins and C. Ferdinand Sybert. Dur- 
ing that time, he did extensive appellate 
work in both the Court of Appeals of 
Maryland and the Federal Appellate 
Courts. He also represented the various 
State agencies with regard to their prob- 
lems, and handled a number of tax cases 
for the Comptroller of the Treasury and 
the State Tax Commission. 

Assigned by the Attorney General to 
the General Assembly of Maryland for 
the sessions of 1952, 1953, 1954 and 
1955, Mr. Hartman drafted legislation 
and advised and consulted with mem- 
bers of the General Assembly and the 
legislative committees. 

From October, 1955, until he became 
Deputy City Solicitor in July, 1959, Mr. 
Hartman was associated with the law 
firm of Semmes, Bowen and Semmes, 
where he was engaged in the general 
practice of law. 

Mr. Hartman is a member of the 
Junior Bar Association of Baltimore 
City, Bar Association of Baltimore City, 
the Maryland State Bar Association and 
the American Bar Association. 



MR. WINTER 



MAYOR CRADY 



JUDGE BERRY 





Meet Your New Alumni Officers 







Harry Boswell, Jr. 

HARRY BOSWEl 1., JR., '42, MOVED UP TO THE POST OF 
President of the (icneral Alumni Council this year 
from his position of Vice President, which he held 
lasl year. 

It has been said that if a job must be done, the alreadj 
busy man will do it best. The adage fits Mr. Boswell perfectly, 
lor it would be difficult to find a busier man. He is active in 
legal, political and economic affairs and is a well-known com- 
munity planner in the area. In 1956 he was selected by the 
Maryland Real Estate Association as "Realtor of the Year." 
In that year also, he found time to visit Russia to consult 
with architects and planners of major Soviet cities. 

Mr. Boswell served in World War II, with extensive com- 
mand experience as an engineering officer, a combat pilot, 
and a test pilot. 

Involved in many community activities, he is presently 
most active on the County Economic Development Commit- 
tee; acts as Chairman of the County's regional Committee of 
the Health and Welfare Council. He is also Vice President of 
the Metropolitan Washington Health and Welfare Council. 

He has served as President, ollicer or chairman of many 
organizations among which are President of the Maryland 
Council of Chambers of Commerce. President of the Mary- 
land Real Estate Association and Vice President of the Mary- 
land Real Estate Association. 

His organizations include Omicron Delta Kappa. Phi Kappa 
Phi. Beta Gamma Sigma. Phi Eta Sigma. Pi Delta Epsilon, 
Sigma Chi, the Masonic Order. Jefferson Island Club, and the 
terrapin Club. 

Mr, Boswell was awarded the Evening Star [Yophj for 
Civic Achievements in 1958 at a recent meeting o\ the Prince 
Georges County Civic Federation. Most recently, he was 
named In Governor I awes to head the State Department of 
I conomic Development 




M 



Elizabeth Rohr Singleton 

RS. El IZABETH ROHR SINGI ETON IS VICE PRESIDENT 

of the Alumni Council and a Past President of the 
Nurses Alumnae Association. 



Awarded a Diploma in Nursing in l l >47. she held the Nurses 
Alumnae Association scholarship and the Dr. Frank Marino 
scholarship for academic nursing as a student. Mrs. Singleton 
was also awarded the B.S. degree with a major in nursing 
education, graduating with honors from the College of Edu- 
cation. She has done graduate work at the University of 
Maryland and Johns Hopkins University. 

Mrs. Singleton has been active professionally, serving at 
different times as Supervisor and Instructor of Auxiliary Per- 
sonnel. University Hospital: Clinical Instructor. School of 
Nursing; and Director of Guidance and Coordinator of Stu- 
dent Personnel Services at the School of Nursing. 

In addition to her membership in the Nurses Alumnae 
Association. Mrs. Singleton is a member of the Maryland 
League for Nursing and the National League for Nursing. 
She belongs to the Maryland State Nurses Association and the 
American Nurses Association. She is a charter member of Pi 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



chapter of Sigma Theta Tau — a national nursing honorary 
society established this year at the University ol Maryland, 
Mrs. Singleton is also active as a member of the University 
Hospital Women's Board, the Women's Auxiliary to the Bal- 
timore ( u\ Medical Society, the Junior Women's Club of 
Catonsville, and the Catonsville Community Concert Associa- 
tion. 




Dr. William H. Triplett 

DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, VICE PRESIDENT OF THE 
Alumni Council, has long been active in University 
and alumni activities. 

Graduating from the Baltimore Medical College in 1911, 
he served his internship in West Virginia Miners Hospital No. 
2, McKendree, West Virginia. In 1912 he located in the Tug 
River coal field, where he engaged in general and industrial 
practice, leaving there in 1917 for service in the Army Medical 
Reserve Corps. 

After service in Europe, he was discharged from the Army 
and in 1919 he returned to Baltimore, where he engaged in 
general practice. His association with the Department of 
Medicine, School of Medicine, began in 1924 and continued 
until he re-entered the Army in 1941, immediately becoming 
surgeon of the 29th Infantry Division with the rank of Colonel. 
He held that position until March, 1943, when he was 
relieved because of illness, a condition which ultimately 
resulted in retirement from the service. 

His interest in alumni affairs has been very evident for 
many years. He has served in various capacities within the 
administrative structure of the Medical School Alumni Asso- 
ciation, including the office of president in 1950. He served as 
the Executive Director of the Medical Alumni Association in 
4954. 

Dr. Triplett has also served as President of the Association 
'of Military Surgeons of the United States. He is a resident of 
Baltimore and a veteran of both World Wars. He is active 
in all Masonic bodies, the American Legion, and wild life 
and sportsman's organizations. 

November-December, 1959 



Engineering Teachers 
Completing Doctoral 

Work under the 
Charles M. White Plan 



TWO TEACHERS IN MECHANICAL EN- 
gineering, Harold D. Cather and 
Clifford L. Sayre, have had grants from 
the "Helen B. and Charles M. White 
Fellowship and Loan Plan" established 
last year in connection with the Greater 
University of Maryland Fund, and both 
are working on the completion of their 
doctoral degrees. 

Mr. Sayre's research is in the field of 
"Hydrodynamic Performance of Scoop- 
type Openings" and Mr. Cather's re- 
search is in the field of "Heat Power 
and Energy Conversion." 

"This is a significant pioneering effort 
that we hope will become an important 
trend," according to Dr. F. T. Mavis, 
Dean of the College of Engineering. 
"We need vastly more doctorate work in 
engineering today to keep pace with the 
rapid advances of science, and this is the 
realistic way this is accomplished," he 
continued. 

"We are grateful for the White Plan, 
and the interest of other institutions in 
it indicates that it will be followed by 
others," he added. 

Since 1950 there have been about 600 
doctoral degrees granted in engineering 
each year in America and it is reliably 
estimated by authorities in this field that 
three or four times this number will be 
needed to satisfy the needs of teaching, 
research and industry. For the teaching 
profession alone we should be turning 
out at least 1,000 new doctorates in En- 
gineering each year. Dr. Mavis further 
pointed out that increasing the supply of 
teachers of high calibre with advanced 
degrees is the only means by which the 
current shortage of engineers can be 
overcome and the engineering profes- 
sion as a whole can keep pace with the 
expansion of technology. 



15 



Greater University of Maryland 
Fund Tops $200,000 in October 



I 



(.C ¥ N LESS IHAN rWO M \KS. I HI. 

alumni ol the I oiversity ol Mars- 
land have contributed more than 
$200,000 to the Greater University ol 
Maryland Fund ... a real testimonial 
to our overwhelming alumni loyalty, and 
the line Fund organization," declared 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, 12. General 
Chairman ol the Greater University ol 
Maryland Fund. 

During 1959, more than 1.500 alumni 
took part in the General Canvass, and 
there have been more than 6,300 gifts 
to date. 

In August, there was mailed to all 
alumni a copj ol the '59 Honor Roll 



and a financial report showing the dis- 
tribution ol the I uiul. 

"No! only is the neu Baltimore Union 
being furnished out ol the Fund pro- 
ceeds, but we have made a significant 
advance in the areas that assure our 
leadership as a University — in scholar- 
ships for outstanding students, and in 
the neu field ol faculty development." 
Dr. Goldstein continued. 

"In my opinion." he added, "the 
Funds value goes far beyond its fine 
financial record: ue have started a 
strong flow ot widespread and construc- 
tive goodwill for Maryland, and we have 
shown how well we can work together. 



I rom here on. we can continue to build 
on a record of solid accomplishment.*' 

"The first two years are always the 
most difficult." he pointed out. 

He said that he wanted to comment 
everyone who had helped make the 
Fund successful, and he expressed the 
hope that even more alumni would find 
pleasure and satisfaction in participating 
in the General Canvass and contributing 
to the Fund. 

The 1960 Program of the Fund will 
be launched around the first of the year, 
and there is every expectation that there 
will be substantial growth year by year 
now that the Fund has gained momen- 
tum. 



Dr. Livingston Honored as a 
Distinguished Maryland Alumnusj 



Till ENTIRE TOWN OF GIBSON, 
North Carolina, poured out re- 
cently to a bountiful chicken din- 
ner in honor ot Dr. Everett A. Living- 
ston ot the Medical School class of 
1912. who has practiced in Gibson for 
almost 50 years. 

At the dinner tribute was paid to Dr. 
Livingston's long record ol service by 
Dr. James J. Richardson ol I aurinburg, 
President ol the State Medical Society. 
Dr Richardson said in part: 

"Probably no physician in the State 
ol North Carolina has given more dili- 
gently and charitably ol his time than 
has Dr. Everett. Ihrough the years he 
has visited the homes ol the rich and 
the poor alike, and I am sure that none 
ol us has .inv conception of the number 
ol home deliveries he has done. In his 




Dr. Livingston 



office he has done \ery successfully! 
surgery that could not have been donJ 
in our line hospitals by someone lesJ 
stout-hearted than he." 

There was then presented to Dr 1 ivl 
ingston the Distinguished AlumnuJ 
award with the following citation: 

"The University of Maryland join! 
the patients, friends and neighbors ol 
Dr. F. A. Livingston of Ciibson. Nortll 
Carolina, in honoring him as an aluml 
mis of the Universitv who has mainl 
tained for almost half a century thJ 
finest traditions of the medical profesl 
sion and has rendered an outstanding 
service to his community and to 
kind." 

The citation was signed by Dr 
William S. Stone. Dean oi the Schoo 
ol Medicine, and by President Elk 



16 



the Maryland Magazim 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 



Is He Over ? 



RAYMOND B. YOSKOSKY, '60 




dick novak, Maryland quarterback, at the wake forest goal line. Officials ruled no touchdown saying he lost the ball before he 
went into the end zone. Players shown are 71, tackle Bob Smith; 40. halfback Jack Tesh: 78. tackle Wayne Wolff; 61. guard Nick Patella; 
S3, end Pete Manning; and 54, center Jimmy Lanier, all of the Deacons. Terps shown are 20, halfback Ev Cloud; 64. guard Tom 
Gunderman; 52, center Vic Schwartz; and 41, halfback Gene Verardi. What do you think? Final score, Maryland 7 - Wake Forest. 10. 



November-December, 1 959 



17 



I 





it 






BW 



*.#JN?*£>*j 







'? ' 



'«■ 




ftift W 




ii\iiii\(k BOB GAL1 u.iiiK i\kis iiii winning ioi ( iiddwn <m </• A/j shoulder 111 Maryland's 14-7 win against North Carolina ()t tuber 
17. The pass was towed by Dale Hetty, stand-out player throughout the Parents Day Game. Tar Heel defender Wayde Smith, ti ih, 
immediate right of Gallagher, made his tackle at the goal line, hut Gallagher's on-rushing monu mum pushed lam into touchdown territory. 



13 Varsity Candidates 
Report to Coach Millikan 





1959 


Football Schedule 


Mar) land 


27 — West Virginia 7 


Maryland 


0— Texas 26 


Mai \ land 


— Syracuse 29 


Mar\ land 


7— Wake Forest 10 


Mary land 


14 — North Carolina 7 


October 


3 1 South Carolina 
at Columbia 


November 


7 Nav) 
at Baltiiih •ii' ( 8 p.m. ) 




1-4 Clemson 
<u Clemson 




2 1 Virginia 

Hume ( Homecoming ) 


December 


5 N ( . State 
Home 



Tiiiki i in VARS1 n < \ndid\i is im- 
ported to Maryland basketball coach 
H. A. Bud" Millikan October 15 as the 
Terps opened practice for the 1959-60 
season. Millikan. who has brought na- 
tional prominence to basketball at 
Maryland, is starting his tenth season as 
Terrapin coach. He has compiled a rec- 
ord of 144 wins against 79 losses. 

The Terrapins will play a 20-game 
schedule and will compete in the Blue 
Crass Tournament in Louisville, Ky., 
during the Christmas holidays. The reg- 
ular season schedule lists ten home 
games and ten awa\ games. 

Returning are five lettermen from the 
l l »5S \arsit\. tour of whom were on 
the starting five at the end of the season. 
Millikan lost tour lettermen through 
graduation. Senior Pete Krukar, 6-1 
guard from lord City, Pa., was a starter 
at the close ol the season. Graduates 
Gene Danko and Bill Murph) were first 
team at various times during the year. 
Also gone are Jim Halleck. the other 
starter at the close of the year, and Doc 
w eingarten. 



With Krukar are Miliikan's outstand- 
ing three-some of the past two y« 
6-6 Charles McNeil. Pennsgrove, N I 
6-8 Al Bunge. Delanco, N. J.: and 6-2 
Jerry Bechtle. Elizabeth, N. J. 

Millikan promises a battle royal for 
the starting five. With McNeil. Bunge. 
Bechtle. and Krukar having the inside 
track at the beginning, the tilth spot is 
wale open, leading candidates tor the 
job are 6-7 letterman Bob McDonald. 
junior, Lansdowne. Pa.: 6-2 senior Jerrj 
Shanahan, Pittsburgh. Pa.: 6-9 junior 
Bob Wilson. Freedom. Pa.: and 6-2 
soph, a hold out last year. Bruce Kelle- 
her. W ilmington. Del. Kelleher is highh 
regarded b\ Millikan. 

Other candidates are 6-2 Paul Jelus. 
Camden. N. J., and 6-6 Ted Marshall. 
Johnstown. Pa., both held out lasi 
with Kelleher. Cp from the freshman 
squad are 6-1 Dave Schroeder. Media. 
Pa., and 6-2 Steve Alpert. Brooklyn, N 
Y. A service returnee is 5-9 Mike N 
singer. Westernport, Md. 

BASK1 I U\l I M HI III I I ON N| \ I PAGI 



18 



the Mar vi \\n Magazine 



1958-1959 Sports Year— Part II 

CONTINUED FROM Mil- SEPTEMBER-OCTOBEF ISSUE 



I Ik- indoor track team won its fourth 
Atlantic Coast Conference champion- 
ship in a row I he title represented 
four crowns won in the five years of 
running the indoor meet. The lerps 
had individual championships in Don 
Whitaker, Larrj Salmon. Jim Star- 
board. Bjorn Andersen. Tom Tait and 
Carl Prigg. I hey also won the mile 
and two-mile relays to wrap up the title 
h\ a big margin. 

Coach Bill Campbell's swimming 
team continues to improve and their 
performance in the Conference meet 
gave indications that the 1959-60 team 
will be the one that perennial favorites 
North Carolina and Duke will have to 
watch more closely. They finished third 
in the final league standing with a five 
won and two lost record. For the sea- 
son they won eight and lost five. In the 
individual Conference championships, 
Campbell had four champions. They 
were Thurlovv Park in the 440 free 
style, Mike Vaeth in the 1500 meter 
free style and Bob Kohl won both the 
low and high diving titles. 



L 



T WAS MARYLAND WHO ONCE AGAIN 

dominated wrestling in the Conference 
last winter. Coach Sully Krouse's 
matmen won the league title for the 
sixth year in a row. They have not 
lost a wrestling match in the Con- 
ference. For the season, they had 
live league victories and their overall 
mark was six wins and three losses. In 
the Conference tournament, Maryland 
won eight of the ten individual titles. 
The champions were Ray Osborne, 
Dick VanAuken, Ray Haney, Don 
Santo, Nick Biondi, Dick Besnier, 
Leroy Kennedy and Dick Dean. Santo 
was voted the outstanding wrestling 
trophy of the Tournament. 

The 1959 spring sports schedule was 
a most successful one. The outstanding 
highlight was Maryland defeating arch 
rival Navy in all five contests; baseball, 
tennis, golf, lacrosse, and track. 

The lacrosse team once again had 
a brilliant season with a team that 
Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy 
said did the finest job that any of their 

November-December, 1 959 



lacrosse teams had done in a great 
number oi years, Once again, the) 
took the Conference championship as 
they have done each year and were 
voted as tri-national champions along 



1959-60 Varsity 
Basketball Schedule 

December 3 George Washing- 

ton 
at George Washington 

9 Virginia 
Home 

14 Georgetown 
Home 

1 8 Wake Forest 

Home 

28-29 Blue Grass 

Tournament 
Louisville, Ky. 

January 4 Yale 

Home 

8 South Carolina 
Home 
1 3 Georgetown 

at Georgetown 

1 6 Duke 
at Durham 

18 N. C. State 
Honie 
20 Navy 
at Annapolis 

February 3 North Carolina 

Home 

6 Wake Forest 
at Wake Forest 
10 Virginia 
at Virginia 
13 N. C. State 
at N. C. State 

1 5 Clemson 
Home 

18 Duke 
Home 

20 George Washing- 
ton 
Home 

23 North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill 

26 Clemson 
at Clemson 

27 South Carolina 
at Columbia 



with Arm) and loims Hopkins. I he 
season was highlighted in a sensa- 
tional 17-16 win ovei defending na 
tional champion, Army, rhe following 
week the) played Hopkins with sole 

claim to the national championship at 
stake. The Mine Jays came up with 
their best performance ol the sear to 
hand the lerps their first and only loss 
of the season. They won ten. rhe 
outstanding individual was Junior 
Attackman Roger Goss who had 37 
goals and assisted on 37 others. Other- 
top performers were Jeff Keating, Al 
Spellman, Ab Tiedcmann, Jerry Thelen. 
Buddy Waesche, Bob Schwartzbcrg. 
and Fred Kern. Tiedemann, Waesche. 
and Kern played in the all-Star game 
for the South. 



T, 



HE OUTDOOR TRACK TEAM CAME 

through with one of the most brilliant 
seasons ever had at the University of 
Maryland. They won the Atlantic 
Coast Conference title for the third 
consecutive year and their fourth in 
five years. Jim Kehoe's outdoor teams 
have been undefeated in dual meets 
since 1955, a span that covers 20 Con- 
ference dual meet victories. In the 
Atlantic Coast Conference meet they 
won with a record breaking point score 
of IO6V2 points. This was more points 
scored than all the other seven schools 
put together. They had seven individ- 
ual title winners. They were Butch 
Spiegel in the 100, Don Whitaker in the 
220: Bill Johnson. 120 yard high 
hurdles: Larry Salmon, 220 yard low 
hurdles; Bjorn Andersen and Carl Prigg 
tied for pole vault title: Tom Tait, high 
jump; and Nick Kovalakides, discus. 
In the ICAAA championships in New 
York, Maryland came through with 
its finest performance as it finished 
second to Penn State. The Terps had 
four individual champions in Kovala- 
kides in the javelin. Johnson in the 
high hurdles; Tait in the high jump, and 
Andersen in the pole vault. Six of the 
boys represented the University at the 
NCAA championships at the Univer- 
sity of Nebraska. 

The tennis team won seven matches 
and lost five and finished fourth in the 
Conference. The top performer for 
the team was Sophomore Chuck 
Ableson. 

(Continued on next page) 

19 



L 



The Sports Year 

( ontinued from previous page 



c 



o\( II I K\\k ( RON1N s 0O1 I I I \\1 

had another fine year winning seven 
and losing three and tieing one. They 
finished fourth in the league. Senior 
and captain Del Beman placed third in 
the individual champions in the Con- 
ference tournament. The big news in 
goll during the spring was the brilliant 
playing of Deane Beman. He was 
chosen to participate in the Masters 
and was selected as a member of the 
Walker (up learn, a distinction no 
other University of Maryland student 
has had. Because of these two selec- 
tions. Beman dropped out of school tor 
the spring semester. He went on to 
bring the University of Maryland world 
wide publicity as he won the British 
Amateur Championship in Sandwich, 
England. He also won his singles 
match in the Walker Cup playoff. 
Beman brought to the University more 
publicity than can be recalled since 
the \isit of Queen Elizabeth II and 
Prince Philip to the North Carolina- 
Maryland football game in By id Sta- 
dium two \ears ago and the national 
football team in 1953. Beman plans 
to return to the University this fall. 

Coach Burton Shipley's baseball 
team had a very exciting season win- 
ning I 1 and losing 7. They finished in 
fourth place in the league finishing with 
a 7-6 mark. At one time during the 
season the) had a winning streak of 
eight games and were leading the Con- 
ference. Except for two very close 
losses to North Carolina and Virginia, 
they would have won the Atlantic 
(oast Conference title. The season 
was highlighted by the no hit perfect 
game pitched by Senior Dick Reitz of 
Bel Air. This was the first perfect 
game to be pitched in the history of 
the University of Maryland with or- 
ganized baseball teams of the Univer- 
ses starting in 1893. Reitz, a strong 
right bander, won eight and lost two 
lor the season. Maryland placed four 
on the all-Conference team. I 'hey were 
pitcher Dick Reit/. shortstop Frank 
Copper, third baseman Don Santo and 
centerfielder Pat Clarke. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



NOVEMBER 

21 Homecoming: Football vs. Vir- 
ginia. 

25 fhanksgiving recess begins — Col- 
lege Park. 

JO Thanksgiving recess ends — College 
Park. 

DEC1 MB1 R 

4-12 U. l . Production: Medea. 

5 I ootball —vs. N. C. State— ( ollege 

Park. 
9 Basketball — vs. Virginia — College 
Park. 

14 Basketball — vs. Georgetown — Col- 
lege Park. 

18 Basketball— vs. Wake Forest— Col- 
lege Park. 



19 Christmas recess begins — College 
Park. 

I \M \IO 

4 Basketball — vs. Vale — College 
Park. 

Christmas recess ends — College 
Park. 

14 National Symphony Orchestra: 
Opera Night — Ritchie Coliseum 
8:30 p.m. 

18 Basketball— vs. N. C . State— Col- 
lege Park. 

21-27 Hist semester examinations — Col- 
lege Park. 

I I BR1 AKV 

1-5 Registration for second semester — 
(ollege Park. 




I t * 






°\* 



•V 






Mj 



*~<M 



I 



JEN 



BIRTH 
DEFECTS 

ARTHRITIS 
POLIO 




National Appeal Extends January 1-31 



20 



the Maryland Magazim 



Campus Notes 

Continued from page V 



Bosw in Hi \ns 
Devei OPM! N I Depari MI-NT 

Harrj A. Boswell, '42. and recently 

elected President of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, has been named by Governor 
Tawes to head up the newly-formed 
State Department of Economic Develop- 
ment. 



Well Known Painter 
Joins Art Faculty 

Mitchell Jamieson, the well known 
American painter, has been appointed 
to the faculty of the Art Department. 

His work is represented in a number 
of public buildings, including murals 
for U. S. Post Offices in Upper Marl- 
boro and Laurel, Maryland; Willard, 
Ohio; the Marian Anderson Mural in 
the United States Interior Department, 
and the General Accounting Office 
Building, Washington, D. C. He was 
one of five artists invited to submit a 
mural design for the United Nations 
Building. He did a series of paintings on 
the Henry Morganthau estate at Fish- 
kill. New York, and at Hyde Park, for 
the late President and Mrs. Roosevelt. 
During World War II he served as a 
combat artist with the Navy. 

Mr. Jamieson has received numerous 
prizes and awards for his work, includ- 
ing a First Prize in Pepsi-Cola's Fifth 
Annual Art Competition, 1948, Guggen- 
heim Foundation Awards in 1947 and 
1948, and a grant from the American 
Academy of Arts and Letters, 1947. 

His work is exhibited in galleries and 
museums throughout the country. The 
Art Department held a one-man show 
of his work this fall at the Student 
Union Building. 



Air Science Dept. 
Has New Head 

Air Force Colonel Theodore R. Ayles- 
worth has been appointed Professor of 
Air Science and Head of the Department 
of Air Science. Assuming charge of 
AFROTC Detachment 360, Col. Ayles- 

(Continued on next page) 



FOR ALL YOUR HOMECOMINGS 



THE 



0mm 



DIPLOMAT 

WASHINGTON'S LARGEST 
AND NEWEST MOTOR HOTEL 



Just 10 minutes from the campus at the intersection of 
Bladensburg Road and New York Ave., N.E. 
TV and Bath in every Room . . . Restaurant and Lounge . . . 
Completely Air Conditioned and Heated . . . Swimming 
Pool . . . Individual Parking . . . Valet Service 

Call LAwrence 6-1400 or write Dept. M, Diplomat Motor Hotel, 
Bladensburg Road and New York Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 





Staffer'* 

CONVALESCENT RETREAT 

Situated on a knoll in the center of a 10-acre lawn, 
beautiful shade trees and landscape grounds 

ELLICOTT CITY, MARYLAND 

25 minutes to downtown Baltimore — 30 miles to Washington 

Phone Ellicott Citv 206 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO.. Inc. 

Link Belt Company "Pyrene" & "MSA" Industrial 

Power Transmission • "C-O-TWO" • Gas Masks. Canisters 
Supplies Fire Extinguishers & First Aid Equipment 



2600 12th STREET. N.E. 



WASHINGTON 18. D. C. 



LAwrence 6-1362 



PlusnbinG and cMeatintj Semica 

AA2A Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 

WOodley 6-71 22 Day or Night, WOodley 6-5181 



ADVERTISE 

IN 
MARYLAND 
MAGAZINE 



NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHEONS 




2637 Conn. Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C. 



November-December, 1959 



21 



worth ho. uls the largest aikok de- 
tachment in the country He replaces 
( ol Robert I Kendig, who is now 
directoi ol operations .it Amarillo Ail 
Force Base, Amarillo, (exas. 

( nl Aylesworth, a graduate ol Mans- 
field State reachers College and the 
University ol Pennsylvania, began his 
military career in 1933 in the 2Sth In- 
fantry Division of the Pennsylvania 
Nation. il Guard. He entered thing train- 
ing in March, 1938. 

I pon completion ol his training at 
Randolph Field and Kelly Field in 
February, 1939, he was commissioned 
2nd I icutenant in the Army Reserve 
and assigned to the Air Corps. 

In 1952. he attended the Air War 
College at Maxwell Air Force Base. 
Alabama, and upon graduation served 
three additional years at Maxwell Air 
Force Base, where he was deputy for 
operations in Headquarters. Air Uni- 
versity. 

In outlining his objectives at the Uni- 
versity. Col. Aylesworth told the Dia- 
mondback: "The most important func- 
tion presently for the AFROTC program 
is keeping pace with progress, scientific 
and otherwise." 





Col. Aylesworth 



Incoming freshmen were introduced 
to both the opportunities and the facili- 
ties oi the AFROTC program during 
orientation week. Col. Aylesworth plans 
to develop a more personal relationship 
between his department and the rest of 
the campus and at the same time to 
develop an increased amount of interest 
among students in the ROTC program. 



I"v l \i\(, ( OX RSI s Ol i l RED 

Some twenty-six courses will be offered 
by the University in the evening. Sep- 
tember 21 to January 22. The program 
will serve adults unable to attend regu- 
lar day classes. 

arses offered are: Organization and 
( ontrol ( B. A. 10. II): Principles of Ac- 
counting (B.A. 20. 21); Principles ot 
Economics I Econ. 31. 32). Composi- 
tion and American Literature (Eng. 1. 
2). Composition and World Literature 
(Eng. 3); Shakespeare (Eng. 115); Ele- 
mentary French ( French 1 , 2 ) : Elemen- 
tary German (German 2): Histors oi 
American Civilization ( H. 5. 6); Busi- 
ness Algebra (Math. 5): Algebra 
i Math. 10): Elementary Mathematical 
Analysis (Math. 18, 19): Philosophies 
Men Live By (Phil. 123); Introduction 
to Psychology (Psych. 1): Applied Psy- 
chology (Psych. 2): Elementary Rus- 
sian (Russian 1); Sociology of Ameri- 
can Life (Soc. 1 ): Speech Composition 
and Rhetoric (Speech 103, 104). 

Admission requirements are the same 
as for the regular day students. The 
fee for matriculation is SI 0.00. and tui- 
tion charges per credit hour are SI 2 .00 



£ 



* 




4- 



* 



*UDDIN0 



Vetmfo that make emu meal a featt 



22 



THE MARYI AND MAGAZIM 




1 1 i i visid Spanish couRst instructors, Mrs. Herdoiza and Dr. Goodwyn 






Learn Spanish Through Television 

In its educational role, the University 
ol Maryland, through never-ending ef- 
fort, reaches out to serve more and more 
people each year. This year, a course in 
Spanish will reach right into Maryland 
homes through the medium of televi- 
sion. Beginning October 6, and contin- 
uing every Tuesday and Thursday there- 
after until January 21, 1960, early bird 
viewers, properly registered for Spanish 
I TV, may earn credit by attending 
lectures in their living rooms. 

Spanish 1 TV will be taught by Dr. 
Frank Goodwyn, a full Professor at the 
University, who also wrote the textbook, 
The Telecompanion for Elementary 
Spanish, specifically for the course. Dr. 
Goodwyn will be assisted on the air by 
Mrs. Eulalia Jarrin de Herdoiza, a na- 
tive of Ecuador, who is studying for a 
Ph.D. degree at the University. 

Enrollment in the course was approx- 
imately one thousand when it began 
October 6; many more registered before 
the closing date of October 31. 



History of the 
University of Maryland 

The Board of Regents has recently ap- 
proved the writing of a full-scale history 
of the University of Maryland from its 
founding in 1807 to the present time. 



Under the general direction of the De- 
partment of History, and under the 
authorship of Professor George H. 
Callcott, the project is scheduled for 
completion within two years. 

The history is designed as a readable, 
well-illustrated volume of about 400 
pages. Based upon exhaustive profes- 
sional scholarship, it will be neither a 
eulogy, nor merely the administrative 
history of the institution. The history of 
the University is essentially the story of 
higher education in the state, and the 
story of Maryland's aspirations for ex- 
cellence and leadership. As curriculum, 
student life, and educational aims 
changed, and as the University grew — 
or sometimes failed to grow — there is 
mirrored the changing interests and 
ideals of the state. 

The book will be divided into three 
parts. About 150 pages will be devoted 
to the University before the Civil War; 
about 100 pages will tell the story from 
1865 to 1920; and about 150 pages will 
relate events since the consolidation of 
the colleges in Baltimore with those of 
College Park. 

Professor Callcott of the History De- 
partment will devote full time to the 
project for the next two years. Mr. Carl 
Lewis and Mr. Frank Waselewski, both 
1959 graduates of the University, are 
presently serving as graduate research 
assistants. 



Orientation Program Re-organized 

More than 1200 students, who enrolled 
as freshmen at the University this fall, 
took part in preliminary college orienta- 
tion designed to help the new college 
student in making the transition between 
high school and the University. 

Participating in the concentrated two- 
day program, the freshmen were able 
to overcome the tension and insecurity 
that they would normally encounter 
when faced with 2,000 different classes, 
162 buildings, and more than 12,000 
students at the opening of school. 

The pre-college sessions, which were 
held between August 10 and September 
9, provided each student with a per- 
sonal introduction to the University and 
its many offerings. The students toured 
the campus in groups of 25. 

Among the activities experienced by 
the students were reviews of the Uni- 
versity's counseling services, academic 
programs, and intellectual objectives. 
Each student participated in programs 
designed to acquaint him with the li- 
brary facilities, the Health Service, the 
residential program, and the cultural 
activities on the campus. 

According to Mr. B. James Borreson, 
Executive Dean for Student Life, the 
newly - organized orientation program 
promises to be a success. Freshman eval- 

(Continued on next page) 



November-December, 1959 



23 



uation ol the program indicates then 
approval ol the program and recom- 
mends thai it be carried on in future 
years. Registration tins year, according 
in Dei in Borreson, ran more smoothly 
(h. m ever before. 



\ I )l A I'KOV 11)1 S Al)DI I KIN \l I I M)S 

An additional $161,841 has been made 
available to the University ol Maryland 
for student loans for the 1959-60 aca- 
demic year under provisions ol the 
National Defense Education Aet. With 
the new funds, a total of $240,000 is 
available this sear to Mars land students 
with superior academic abilities who 
need financial assistance. 

Dr. Paul Poffenberger, Scholarship 
Loan Committee Chairman, points out 
that with the limited funds initially made 
available, the committee approved 121 
loans amounting to $40,479 during the 
second semester of 1959. It is expected, 
he said, that requests for loans may 
exceed the funds available for the 1959- 
60 school year. 

To be eligible, students must meet 
the following stipulations: I. Be a U. S. 
national — includes those with permanent 
residence status; 2. must be admitted to 
the University of Maryland or Mary- 
land State College; 3. have a good aca- 
demic record and capability of main- 
taining a good standing; and 4. be pre- 
pared to show evidence of the need for 
the amount requested to complete course 
oi study. 

Under the Act, repayment of the 
loans and 39? interest on unpaid bal- 
ance may be arranged over a ten-year 
period, beginning one year after bor- 
rower ceases to be a full-time student. 

Should the borrower serve as a full- 
time teacher in a public school, up to 
509! of the loan and interest may be 
cancelled. This reduction is at the rate 
oi I OS lor each year o\ service as a 
teacher. 

(ailing attention to the provisions of 
the Act which requires the applicant to 
show evidence o\ the need for a loan 
and academic capabilities. Dr. Poffen- 
berger said: "Although we have ap- 
proved over two hundred applications 
since June, more than 30 applications 
have been turned down because the 
students were not able to show need, or 
did not have the academic record to 
qualify lor loans." 

To meet academic requirements, en- 
tering Maryland Ireshmen must have a 
2.5 average out of a possible 4.0 average 
or equivalent thereof in major subjects 



during the last two years ol high school 
I hose Students who are alreadv enrolled 

must have a 2.0 average lor the preced- 
ing semester. 




Dr. Hade 



Dr. Booh Returns to Maryland 

Returned to the University campus after 
a two and a half year absence is Dr. Carl 
Bode, Professor of English. Dr. Bode 
has returned from a tour of service 
as Cultural Attache at the American 
Embassy and Cultural Affairs Officer 
with the United States Information 
Service in Cireat Britain. 

In his dual role. Dr. Bode went about 
his work with considerable effectiveness. 
He established two professorships in 
American literature while in Great Bri- 
tain, one at Leeds University and one 
at King's College London. He was a fre- 
quent lecturer at British universities and 
to scholarly organizations. He is one o\ 
only a small number of Americans to 
be elected a fellow o\ the World Society 
of Literature of the United Kingdom. 

Before assuming his post in Great 
Britain, Dr. Bode had had no previous 
government experience for the position. 
Yet he was received well and his efforts 
to bring about a better working relation- 
ship between the two countries through 
his particular medium met with success 
and praise. A farewell letter from the 
British Association for American Studies 
savs in part: "It has meant a lot to us 
to know that we could count on your 
interest and support in what we are liv- 
ing to i.\o. and to enjoy, through you. a 
relationship with the Lmbassv that re- 
flected our scholarly interests and was 
tree from any suggestion of politics or 
propaganda." 



Dani ok hi Li i i ovvsmi's 
\nnouncemeni 

Recent alumni ol the University who are 
preparing themselves for a career ol 
college teaching, and are planning lo 
enter graduate school in September. 
I960, lor their first year ol graduate 
study, are invited to apply lor the I960 

class ol Danforth Graduate fellows. 

The qualifications of the candidates 
as listed in the announcement from the 
Danforth Foundation are: men of out- 
standing academic ability, personalitv 
congenial to the classroom, and integ- 
rity and character, including serious in- 
quiry within the Christian tradition. I he 
appointments are fundamentally "a re- 
lationship of encouragement" through- 
out the years of graduate study, earn- 
ing a promise of financial aid within 
prescribed conditions as there may he 
need. 






President Wilson H. Elkins has 
named Dr. Paul E. Poffenberger as the 
Liaison Officer to nominate to the Dan- 
forth Foundation two. or not to exceed 
three, candidates for the I960 fellow- 
ships. 

All applications, including the recom- 
mendations, must be completed by Jan- 
uary 31. 1960. Anyone wishing further 
information should get in touch with 
the Liaison Officer. 



Food Fair Stores 
Fin vm i Sc hoi vKsitiPS 

Funds in the amount of S4.500 have 
been received by the University from 
the Food Fair Stores Foundation for 
the support of 16 scholarships. Awarded 
tor a period of four years, the scholar- 
ships go to entering freshmen who can 
demonstrate civic interest, leadership, 
scholarship and financial need. 



UNiviRsin Acquires Critic vi 
Nuci ear Reactor 

Work has begun on a S70.000 build- 
ing at College Park to house the 
Universitv ol Maryland's 10 kilowatt 
"swimming pool" nuclear reactor. I his 
will be the first critical nuclear reactor 
in the state o\ Maryland. 

The nuclear reactor, purchased from 
Allis-C halmers Corporation, will pro- 
vide facilities for training graduate and 
undergraduate students in the applied 
nuclear field. 



24 



T H E M A R V I AND MAGAZINE 



The now building, to be located adja- 
cent to the University's t bemical Engi- 
neering Building, will also house a 
nuclear reactor simulator purchased 

from Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator 
Company and now operating, as well as 
an existing subcritical nuclear reactor 
which contains about three tons of 
natural uranium and uses two plutonium 
beryllium neutron sourees all on loan 
from the AEC. 

Students will obtain operating experi- 
ence on the simulator and the subcri- 
tical reactor prior to work on the critical 
facility. 

Grants from the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission, which to date have totaled 
$ I S3. 785. and funds from the state of 
Maryland have been used to purchase 
the reactor and related equipment. 

The critical reactor consists of an 
assembly of fuel plates located under 
about 1 5 feet of water. These fuel plates 
are approximately one-sixteenth of an 
inch thick and more than two feet long. 
They are comprised of two cladding 
plates of an aluminum and uranium 



Tlw sub-critical reactor. 



alios which are enriched with (he fission- 
able isotope, uranium 235, sandwiched 
between the two plates. 

Hydrogen of the water provides the 
moderation, a process in which the last 
neutrons from the fission reaction col- 
lide with nuclei o\ the hydrogen atoms, 
similar to a billiard ball collision, to 
lose energy or be slowed down. At the 
lower energy, capture by uranium 235 
nuclei proceeds more readily to cause 
further fission. 

The water also provides the small 
amount of cooling required, helps shield 
the operators, and allows convenient 
and visible access to the reacting assem- 
bly. The reactor is expected to be operat- 
ing for training purposes by the 1960-61 
school year. 

The critical reactor and related equip- 
ment will be under the nuclear engineer- 
ing program which was initiated by the 
department of chemical engineering in 
1954. Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Professor, is 
Chairman of the Department. Dr. Dick 
Duffey, Professor, is in direct charge of 
the nuclear engineering work. 



( 'ollege of 
AGRICULTURE 




I // Hamilton 



Win I ill <i GRAZ1 

J. Thomas Reid, '41, Professor of Ani- 
mal Husbandry at Cornell University, 
answers the question "Why do cattle 
graze as they do?" in an excellent article 
in the June issue of Hoard's Dairyman 
magazine. The article shows that cattle 
up-grade their diet by their ability to 
select the best herbage. 



Mosquito Official 

Dr. William E. Bickley, Professor and 
Head, Department of Entomology, was 
elected Vice President of the American 
Mosquito Control Association at the 
annual meeting in Salt Lake City. The 
American Mosquito Control Association 
is an organization of entomologists, en- 
gineers, physicians, and practical mos- 
quito control workers organized for the 
purpose of furthering scientific mos- 
quito control and related activities. The 
Mosquito Control Program in the state 
of Maryland operates within the legal 
framework of the State Board of Agri- 
culture. Cooperative work with over 200 
communities is being carried on in 1 3 
counties. In addition to mosquito con- 
trol activities which are largely the 
responsibility of the State Entomologist. 
Dr. George S. Langford, the Depart- 
ment of Entomology is engaged in sev- 
eral research projects which will result 
in a better understanding of the biology 
of mosquitoes and their relationship to 
Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis. 

4-H Leader on Leave 

Roy Cassell, Assistant 4-H Club Leader, 
is on leave from the University of Mary- 
land for advanced study at the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. Cassell is the recipient 
of a fellowship from the Kellogg Foun- 
dation. 



Swartz Heads Testimonial Dinner 

A congressional appreciation dinner was 
held in Baltimore to honor their veteran 
congressmen, Samuel Friedel, Edward 
Garmatz and George Fallon. James 
Swartz, '17. was the general chairman. 
"The main idea was to encourage 
good men to apply their best efforts to 
(Continued on next page I 



November-December, 1959 



25 



political service."' stated Mr. Swart/. 
( niicism is not enough. We believe a 
pal on the upper part ol the hack will 
help anyone. We regard it essential to 
a healths democracy that we attract men 
ol high calibre to the important practice 

ol politics." 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Stufi of i lw College 



History Adds 
iii ii i n (iraduate assisi ants 

Within one year the History Department 
has increased its number of graduate 
assistants from exactly one, to a total 
of sixteen. 

The increase has been made possible 
largely by the new lecture-discussion 
section system of scheduling survey 
courses. Instead of regular staff mem- 
bers meeting classes of about 45 stu- 
dents three times per week, under the 
new system the outstanding staff lectur- 
ers meet 500 students twice a week, and 
graduate assistants meet with groups of 
twenty students for one hour per week 
oi discussion. The system is thought to 
be better for students, and it allows a 
great increase in the Department's grad- 
uate program. 

Graduate assistants devote approxi- 
mately one-third of their time to this 
apprentice teaching, and receive from 
$1500 to S2000 per year, plus exemp- 
tion from tuition and fees. 



Additions and Promotions 
in History DEPARTMENT 

The Department of History added two 
members to its permanent staff this fall. 
Assistant Professor Paul Conklin, Ph.D. 
from Vanderbilt and recently professor 
at Southwestern of Louisiana, is a spe- 
cialist in the field of American intellec- 
tual history. His recent volume, Tomor- 
row a New World: The New Deal Com- 
munity Program, won the Albert J. 
Beveridge Award, coveted prize oi the 
American Historical Association. Mr. 
Frank O. Ciatell. of Harvard and the 
University ol Puerto Rico, has been 
named instructor in the field of Ameri- 
can and Puerto Rican history. 

The Department also announced the 
promotion oi Dr. Richard Bauer to full 
Professor in medieval and modern Euro- 



pean history and the promotion ol Dr. 
George H. Callcott to Assistant Pro- 
lessor. 



Dl< \\ M Sll 1(1 ( |\( INS \l I 

Dr. Richard P. Walsh. Ph.D. '57. has 
recently been appointed Chief Counselor 
in the University of Cincinnati Testing 
and Counseling (enter. He has been 
Counseling Psychologist at the Perry 
Point. Maryland, Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital. Dr. and Mrs. Walsh and 
their three children are living at 6240 
Joyce I.ane, Cincinnati. 



Rosi Hi i \i>in i ( iiv ln Pin 

Miss Rose Belmont, '48, who works in 
the Division of International Health. 
Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare, recently completed ten years 
of active Federal service. In recognition 
of this service, she was presented a pin 
and a letter of appreciation by Dr. H. 
Van Zile Hyde. Assistant to the Surgeon 
General for International Health. 



goodfei tow, rubin 
at Washington Col. lege 

Guy F. Goodfellow. who earned his 
M.A. degree in history in 1958. has 
taken the position of Instructor at 
Washington College, Chestertown. Md. 
For two years. Mr. Goodfellow was a 
research assistant in the History De- 
partment and he has done research at 
the Smithsonian Institution. He is a 
member of the Mississippi Valley His- 
torical Association, the societies of Phi 
Kappa Phi. Pi Sigma Alpha, and Phi 
Alpha Theta. He is the recipient of the 
Carlyle Earp Prize for Historical Writ- 
ing, awarded by Phi Alpha Theta last 
year. 

Also on the teaching stall" at Wash- 
ington College is Mordecai Rubin, new 
Instructor in Spanish. Mr. Rubin is 
presently working toward a Ph.D. de- 
gree from the University of Maryland. 
He has taught in New York City. 
Ciannon College in Erie. Pennsylvania, 
and did private tutoring at the Univer- 
sity ol Mexico. 



Liebson to Armour Researi h 

Dr. Sidney H. I iebson, '47. has been 
named Assistant Director of physics 
research at Armour Research Founda- 
tion oi Illinois institute of Technology. 



An authority in the fields of radiation 
detection, electronics, organic fluores- 
cence and semiconductors. Dr. I. iebson 
has published about 20 papers and is 
the holder ol fix c- patents. He received 
his doctorate at the University ol Mary- 
land where he also served as a Visiting 
Protessor. 

He is a member of the Washington 
Academy Ol Sciences. Washington Phil- 
osophical Society, American Nuclear 
Society. American Physical Society and 
the Research Society of America. 

Dr. Montgomery on GW Siui 

Dr. Robert Bruce Montgomery has 
been appointed to the house staff ol the 
George Washington University Hospital 
for the academic year 1959-60. 

Bn i mi v. ii< Promot I I) 

Bruce R. Billmever. '29. (Bachelor of 
Science degree in industrial chemistry l 
has been named Assistant Director of 
Research of the Armstrong Cork Com- 
pany's Research and Development (en- 
ter in Lancaster. Pennsylvania. Mr. Bill- 
mever formerly headed industrial prod- 
ucts research. In his new position he 
will be responsible for research admin- 
istration. 

Bu l iss It u MING at Ft in I 

George Bayliss, '55, became an Instruc- 
tor of art at Flint Junior College. Flint. 
Michigan, this fall. He has been teach- 
ing for the past two years at the Akron 
Institute. Akron. Ohio. 



Dr. W M don ro Swn/i ri \m> 

Dr. Edward Walton. Ph.D. '4s 
spending this year in Basel. Switzerland, 
where he will work for a year with Dr. 
Max Brenner. Professor of Chemistn 
at the University oi Basel, on problems 
ol peptide chemistry. Dr. Walton is 
being sent to Switzerland by the Merck 
Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories 
where he is a senior chemist. 



Three Ph.D. s Join B. F. Goodric h 

Dr. Frank Donat, Dr. Charlotte 
Kraebel, and Dr. Louis Trapasso, all of 
whom received Ph.D. degrees in organic 
chemistry in June. 1959. have joined the 
chemical and plastics research depart- 
ment at the B. F. Goodrich Company 
Research Center. Brecksville. Ohio. 



26 



THE M.\R\I AND MAGAZINE 



Dr. John .1. Quinn, who received his 
Ph.D. degree in 1958, has joined the 
research staff of RCA 1 a hoi atones at 
the David Sarnoff Research Center in 
Princeton. 




Officer Candidate Fritsch 




Officer Candidate Fowler 
Service News 

Robert F. Fowler, '58, and John R. 
Fritsch, '58, recently completed the 
eight-month officers' basic course at 
Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Vir- 
ginia. 

DeStefano Advances at 
Service Bureau 

Robert P. DeStefano, '53, has been 
, promoted to Manager of Sales for the 
Baltimore and Washington, D. C, 
offices of The Service Bureau Corpora- 
tion, a subsidiary of IBM. He was 
. formerly Manager of Sales of the Com- 
pany's Baltimore office. 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1959 



Bethesda f s 

newest 
MOTOR HOTEL 



You can recommend The Bethesdan 
with the utmost confidence^ This 

incomparable Motor Hotel is In \ n- 

i lonely appointed with Indli IdnaJ 
air conditionings wall-to-wall car- 
peting iinl private hath in every 
unit. Large swimming pool. 

7740 

Wisconsin Ave. 



Bethesda 14, Md. 



OLiver 6-2100 



Briggs and Day, Owners 

fyethesdan 






Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







WILLIAMS 




CONSTRUCTION 




COMPANY 




INC. 




General Contractors 




Highways — Airports 




Phone MUrdock 


BALTIMORE, 


6-1000 


MD. 




BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"Become Quality GcwiAckmd" 

PLANT: 621-27 G STREET. N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



27 




Mr. DeStefano 

DeStefano \\;is a member of the 1952 
Sugar Bowl Champions and served in 
the U. S. Air Force as a First Lieuten- 
ant. He lives with his wife, Nancy, and 
three children. Billy 5, Bobby 3, and 
Lynn I. at 519 White Oak Drive, 
Sevema Park. Maryland. 

Pei mer Teaching in Kentui kn 

Mclvin D. Pelmer. '57, M.A. *59, 
joined the Department of Hnglish this 
fall at Western Kentucky State College. 



Sim mm I)i PARI Ml N I 

\\\oi N( i s Pi \ss i OR mi V i \k 

University Theatre recenth announced 
three o! the lour major productions to 

be presented in Skinner Hall auditorium 

this coming season. I hey are: I luce 
Men on a Horse, Medea, and ( tunc 
Hack Little Sheba. 

The first play, Three Men mi a Horse, 

will be directed by Mr. Rudolph Pug- 
liese who has just returned from a one 
year sabbatical at Ohio State where he 
has been completing work tor a Ph.D. 

"Wc are looking lor new blood' to 
participate in the productions. We espe- 
cially need men who are willing to work 
and gain experience." Puglicse said. 

Dr. Charles Niemeyer will direct the 
Robinson Jeflers version of Medea for 
the second production of the season. 

The third show. Conic Back Liulc 
Sheba, will be directed by Herb Rodgers 
who has joined the theatre stalT this 
year. The play was written by William 
Inge and starred Shirley Booth in the 
New York run. 

The final show, which is to be the 
traditional musical, has not been selected 
to date according to Mr. Puglicse. the 
director oi the last production. 

Professor Warren L. Strausbaugh. 
Speech Department Head, announced 



the addition ol Mr. James Armacost as 
the assistant technical director in theatre. 
A Maryland University graduate. Mr. 
Armacost did his graduate work at the 
University of North Carolina. He will 
assist Mr. Charles Schmitt, technical 
ill rector. 

Professor Strausbaugh made known 
that Miss Judy line, a theatre senior 
major, will direct Lillian Hellman's The 
Children's Hour in the Arena Theatre 
during the first semester. These produc- 
tions are entirely a student function and 
serve to supplement the major produc- 
tion series. 

Mr. E. Thomas Slarcher. director of 
the Maryland Drama Wing, has an- 
nounced that thirty-four of the si\t\ 
open engagements of the play. Scattered 
Showers, have been filled in the sur- 
rounding area. I he plaj deals with the 
problems of three mothers and their chil- 
dren. The Drama Wing plays to I' I \ 
groups in the area. 

Other new additions to the speech 
stair were announced by Professor 
Strausbaugh. Sara Kyle and Bruce 
Wagener have joined the stair in gen- 
eral speech and both received their 
Master's degree from Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

L. Denton Crews. Jr.. will assist Mr. 
Malthon Anapol and Mr. D. C. Ander- 
son on the debate program for the 
coming year. 



RIDE TRAILWAYS 

5 STAR LUXURY SERVICE 

• RESERVED SEATS •HOSTESS ABOARD 

• COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS •LIMITED STOPS 

• WASHROOM EQUIPPED 

Daily from Washington and Baltimore to 

NEW YORK — RICHMOND — NORFOLK 



Charter Buses for 
trips anywhere, 
anytime 




Call your 
nearest Trailways 
Terminal 



28 



i hl Maryland Magazine 



Glen Joseph Wolfe, from Iowa State 
University, is .1 new member ol the 
radio and television division in the 
Speech Department, Mr. George Batka, 
television director, saul recently thai 20 
new television receiver *>cts have been 
installed in Francis Scott key Hall for 
the purpose of broadening the services 
of the closed circuit originating in the 
basement of Woods Hall. 

Dr. Richard Hendricks, speech clinic- 
head, announced the return of Mrs. 
Dorothy Craven to the Department alter 
a \ ear's leave of absence. Mrs. Craven 
joined the stall' in 1953 and has special- 
ized in stuttering. 



Faculty Active in 
Dept. oh Microbiology 

Professor Michael J. Pelczar. Jr., has 
been invited to participate as a lecturer 
in a "visiting biologists program for 
high schools" sponsored by the Amer- 
ican Institute of Biological Sciences and 
supported by a grant from the National 
Science Foundation. According to the 
A1BS, each visiting lecturer will spend 
at least three days at each school visited, 
and it is hoped that student interest in, 
and appreciation of, the biological 
sciences will be stimulated generally by 
these visits. 

Dr. Jackson W. Foster, Professor of 
Microbiology, University of Texas, 
Austin, gave a lecture on Thursday, 
October 22nd in Symons Hall Audi- 
torium, University of Maryland. The 
title of his talk was "Dipicolinic Acid 
and Bacterial Spores." Dr. Foster's 
presentation was the first in a series of 
three lectures to be offered during the 
academic year 1959-60 by the Depart- 
ment of Microbiology under the joint 
sponsorship of the American Cyanamid 
Company, Chas. Pfizer and Sons, and 
Merck and Company. Invitations to at- 
tend the lecture were extended to inter- 
ested persons in various nearby research 
and educational institutions. 

Raymond N. Doetsch, Associate Pro- 
fessor, was a member of a panel dis- 
cussion group on '"bacteria that grow 
at low temperatures" sponsored by the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture in 
Washington, D. C, on September 17th. 
Participants included workers from the 
Eastern Regional Research Laboratories, 
Food and Drug Administration, various 
divisions of the Beltsville station. Fort 
Detrick, and representatives of indus- 
trial laboratories. 

Dr. Doetsch received a grant of 
$21,000 from the Department of Health, 

(Continued on next page) 




ARCHES OF TRIUMPH . . . 



Maryland's proud Student Activities Building 
contains 14 241 -foot arches of steel by 
Dietrich Brothers. 

One of the many buildings on the College Park 
Campus containing steel fabricated and 
erected by Dietrich Brothers, Inc. 

WHEN THE JOB CALLS FOR STEEL 

Call 

DIETRICH BROTHERS, INC. 

Baltimore 18, Maryland Hopkins 7-9700 

Washington, D. C. 

Raleigh, North Carolina 
Insurance Bldg., TEmple 2-5623 



DIETRICH 
BROKERS 



STEEL WAREHOUSING 
STEEL FABRICATING 



efc 


rvincj 






i 






THE PUBLIC OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS 


f) 


^Jke 


/john 


<UJ. <=U.uca5 [-^rintina L^ompanu 










26th and SISSON STREETS 










BALTIMORE 11 


MI). 










Phone BElmonf 


5-8600 





TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

8135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md. 



SHIITH uiEioinc 

COMPANY 



PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

Phone UNion 4-1611 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 

Hyattsville, Md. 



HUFFER SHINN 
Optical 
Company, Inc. 

Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET, N.W. 

NAtional 8-1457 Washington, D. C. 



November-December, 1959 



29 



^ 








1 HWIi 1 

If UKJk' 


1 ^Vfl 


''1W 


« 



ENGIN EERS 

P HYSICIST S 
MATHEMATICIANS 

Douglas diversification affords 
broadened opportunities, com- 
bined with stability and se- 
curity. 

Engineering at Douglas is 
divided into three basic areas 
. . . missile and space systems, 
transport aircraft and combat 
aircraft. In these military and 
commercial categories, each 
advancing beyond present fron- 
tiers of achievement, engineers 
and scientists can progress to 
the limit of their capabilities. 

In addition, supervisory and 
executive openings are filled 
from within the company. 
Many of the top executive 
officers at Douglas are engi- 
neers who have moved right up 
to assume wide responsibility. 

We are interested in engi- 
neers with backgrounds in 
other fields as well as avionics, 
aircraft and missiles. 

For further information write 
to Mr. C. C. LaVene, Douglas 
Aircraft Company, Inc., Santa 
Monica, California. 

V Section 




DOUG, 



the most respected name in aircraft, 
missile and space technology 



I ducation and Welfare (U.S.P.H.S | to 
study "involution tonus ui bacteria." 



(rK\Ds \l ( Ml Mil \l ( OKPURATIONS 

( ( . Kirk, '59, recently joined the 
Polymer Research Group ;n \v. r. 
Grace & ( o., ( larksville, Maryland. 

D. F. Clements, '48, who has an LL.B. 
degree from John Marshall Law School, 
has recently accepted a position as a 
patent assistant at Hooker Chemical 
Corporation, Niagara Falls, New York. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 
PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

Service News 

Frank W. Just, '58, has recently com- 
pleted the eight-month officers' basic 
course at Marine Corps Schools, Quan- 
tico, Virginia. 

Jack F. Fultz, Army Reserve Spe- 
cialist Four, '57, completed two weeks 
of active duty training this summer at 
Fort Eustis, Virginia. Mr. Fultz is em- 
ployed by ACF Industries, Inc., in 
Riverdale. 

John Ai.len Appointed Director 

John E. Allen. '58, has been appointed 
Director of Public Information at Lake 
Forest College. Lake Forest. Illinois. 
Mr. Allen previously served as Director 
of the News Bureau at Randolph-Macon 
Woman's College. 

He is a member of Pi Delta Epsilon, 
honorary journalism fraternity, Sigma 
Delta Chi, professional journalism fra- 
ternity, and served as President of the 
Maryland chapter of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, national honorary leadership 
fraternity. He was also elected one of 
the ten most outstanding graduate- in 
the University's Mens league and re- 
ceived the award given by the Baltimore 
chapter of the American College Public 
Relations Association to the outstanding 
public relations graduate. I l >5.s. He 
served as an Information Specialist dur- 
ing his tour years with the Air Force 
and was base newspaper editor at Pep- 



HARVEY DAIRY 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 

SERVING PRINCE GEORGES 
and MONTGOMERY COUNTIES 

Your Neighbors 
Buy Our Milk 



Vitamin D Homogenized Milk 

Grade A Pasteurized Milk 

Eitro Rich Homogenized 

Vitamin D Milk 

Cultured Buttermilk 

Fat Free Milk 

Chocolate Milk 

Butter-Sweet Cream 

Cottage Cheese 

Eggs — Strictly Fresh 

Half and Halt 

Sour Cream 

Table Cream 

Whipping Cream 

Margarine 

Fresh Orange Juice 



APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 



EASTERDAY - 

DUCKWORTH 
ROOFING CO., Inc. 



SLAG ROOFING 

Repairing — Painting 

METAL WORK 



NOrth 7-0336 

2253 SHERMAN AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



" .X <c 



I 




Mr. A lien 

perell Air Force Base, St. John's, New- 
foundland. He has also completed four 
years with the Naval Air Reserve. 

Mr. Allen and his wife, the former 
Phyllis Hayes of St. John's, Newfound- 
land, now make their home on the Lake 
Forest College campus. 



Bureau Publishes 
El ection Statistics 

A reference booklet, Election Statistics 
in Maryland, 1934-1958, has been pub- 
lished by the Bureau of Governmental 
Research. Available in libraries of 
Maryland, the Bureau's newest publica- 
tion carries detailed figures by counties 
for the offices of President, Governor, 
U. S. Senator, and Representative in 
Congress. 

The information is also broken down 
by party percentages of vote. Figures on 
party registration of voters by counties 
and on the potential number of eligible 
voters, difficult to obtain from any 
source, are also included. Graphs for 
each county and for Baltimore City, in 
addition to tables, show election trends. 

Compiled by Evelyn L. Wentworth 
of the Bureau's staff, the statistics pre- 
serve for Maryland users information 
: about election returns in a form not 
otherwise available except to research 
specialists. Similar information on na- 
i tional elections has been published by 
; the Governmental Affairs Institute in 
Washington, and several state universi- 
ties in addition to Maryland, including 
Michigan, Illinois, Kansas, and Wiscon- 
sin, have undertaken to prepare and 
publish data on a state basis. 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1959 



TV time is time for Coke! 




When someone slips out 

between two of your favorite programs 

and comes back with frosty bottles 

of ice-cold Coke for everyone 

. . . the whole family brightens ! 

Bring home the Coke . . . today! 

Bottled under authority of The Coca-Cola Company by 
THE WASHINGTON COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 
Silver Spring, Md. 



Johnston, Lemon & Co 

MEMBER PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



SOUTHERN BUILDING 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3130 



115 N. ST. ASAPH 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 




QUAINT ACRES 
HURSBRIBS 



COMPLETE LINE OF 

NURSERY STOCK IN WIDE VARIETY 

LANDSCAPE SERVICE 

DORMANT SPRAYING 

TRANSPLANTING 

TREE MOVING 

PRUNING 



H. W. "Phoebe" 
Quaintance 
Class of '27 



COLESVILLE PIKE 

(U. S. 29) 

5 MILES FROM 

GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING, 

MARYLAND 

MA 2-1234 



COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, INC. 

AP 7-8200 
SEVEN CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 

John M. Conroy, President 



31 




I 



New Dimensions 

in 

Engineering 

Careers 

at 

Westingliouse 



Engineers with the vision to 
pioneer tomorrow's new dimen- 
sions will find unprecedented 
career opportunities at West- 
inghouse-Baltimore. Here, 
technological breakthroughs in 
Molectronics, Missile Guid- 
ance, Computer Development, 
Communications, Electronic 
Counter-Measures and Space 
Age Electronics are adding new 
dimensions to engineering 
careers. 

FOR DETAILS and copy of 
informative brochure "New Di- 
mensions", write to Mr. A. M. 
Johnston, Dept. 937, Westing- 
liouse Electric Corporation, P. O. 
Box 716, Baltimore 3, Maryland. 



Westinghouse 

BALTIMORE 



AN ENGINEER'S COMPANY 



I ho basic research information it ol 
particular value to all students ol gov- 
ernment, newspapers, and political 
leaders. Detailed data on state and 
count) election returns arc often diffi- 
cull to discover unless compiled and 
published in a single reference source. 



New Si i i>y Pubi ished 

The Bureau of Business and Economic 
Research has published a Study ol the 
European Common Market and its 
relation to the interests of the United 
States. It is entitled The European Eco- 
nomic Community. 

The international organization, which 
became effective in 1958, took its first 
effective steps on January 1, 1959, oper- 
ating under an international treaty 
signed by Belgium, France, the Federal 
Republic of Germany, Italy, Luxem- 
bourg, and the Netherlands. 



Journalism Scholarship Awarded 

Miss April Wilson of Bethesda. a junior 
journalism student, has been awarded 
a $200 journalism scholarship by the 
Montgomery County Press Association. 

Miss Wilson writes for the Old Line, 
student magazine, and serves part time 
as copygirl for the Washington Post- 
Times Herald. 

Fast year she wrote a weekly column 
on women's athletics and recreation for 
the Diamond hack, student newspaper. 

Objective of the scholarship, accord- 
ing to Roger Farquhar, President of 
the Montgomery County Press Associa- 
tion, is to encourage scholarship in the 
study of professional journalism at the 
University toward newspaper careers 
upon graduation. This is the third con- 
secutive year the Association has pro- 
vided the scholarship. 



Dr. Krimei Appointed Consultant 

Dr. Donald \\ . Krimei. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Public Relations, has boon 
appointed special consultant in the 
Federal government's Department oi 
Health. Education, and Welfare. 

Dr. Krimei has been director ol the 
University's major stud) sequence in 
public relations, in the Department oi 
Journalism and Public Relations, since 
its inception in 1951. He will remain 
in that post while serving the Federal 
aeenc\ as an adviser. 




So Good in GLASS I 

Milk and other beverages for 
YOUR family taste better — fresh 
and wholesome — when served in 



GLASS BOTTLES 

You can SEE the Quality and 
Quantity you are receiving. 



INSIST ON GLASS BOTTLES 

No Loss or Contomination of 
Flavor 



LEAKPROOF — SPARKLING 
TRANSPARENT 

I III BUCK GLASS 
COMPANY 

FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 
Baltimore 30, Md. 

Originators of the Square 
Milk Bottle 



Look for the Sign 




Serving Baltimore's Fun si 

Italian Cuisine 



Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.r 

300 Albermarle St. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



. — Closed Mondays 
MU 5-2811 
MU 5-2812 



32 



THE MAR YF AND MAGAZINE 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



kvil,- H . I'm-. /)./) S 



I i 1 1 i in ro \i i mm ( )i i n i 

lo ihe rosier of officers elected bj the 
Alumni Association of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, reported in the September-Octo- 
ber issue of lilt Maryi and Maga/ine, 
should be added Milton B. Asbell. Cam- 
den. New Jersev. Historian. 




Dr. Ramsey 

Wilbur Owen Ramsey, '43 
Honored 

At convocation ceremonies held in New 
York during the Centennial Celebration 
of the American Dental Association, Dr. 
Wilbur Owen Ramsey was received as 
a fellow in the American College of 
Dentists. Dr. Ramsey has, for a number 
of years, been very active in dental 
teaching and research. He attended the 
School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, 1938-1940; following this 
period he attended our dental school, 
graduating with honors in 1943. He was 
in the practice of general dentistry from 
1946-1954, after which he became asso- 
ciated with the dental school on a full 
time teaching basis in the Department 
of Prosthetic Dentistry. In 1957 he at- 
tended the Southern Regional Educa- 
tional Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, a 
survey and planning group to estimate 
dental manpower needs of the south- 
eastern states for the next twenty years. 
His scientific presentations before state 
and national professional organizations 
are too numerous to mention. He is a 
(Continued on page 37) 



OOOOOOQQOOoo- 4'-'. 




he re for a 



>appy holiday 

season! 

KOONTZ 

CREAMERY 
Superb 

EGGNOG 

Serving the Major Portion of MARYLAND 



KOONTZ 




BALTIMORE— Liberty 2-4300 

SALISBURY, MD. WYE MILLS, MD. 

Pioneer 9-7145 EMpire 4-5250 

First with the "Carriage" Trade 



PEABODY CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Peter Mennin, Director 
Announces the remaining 

(Janamiqnt (Jtmcelits 

A sparkling series of Tuesday evening events featuring 

world-renowned soloists and ensembles 

8:30 P.M. 

Nov. 24— Jan. 19— 

The Pamplona Choir from Spain The Netherlands String Quartet 

Dec. 8 — Feb. 9 — Philippe Entremont, 

Mac Morgan, distinguished baritone famed French pianist 

Mar. 22 — Camera Concerti, 
chamber orchestra 



<^zL 



SINGLE TICKETS— $2.50, $2.75, $3.00 



Peabody Ticket Office 
Bonney Concert Bureau 



19 E. Mt. Vernon Place 
15 N. Howard Street 



SA 7-1757 
LE 9-3100 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 



Phone MUlberry 5-6070 



Baltimore 23, Md. 



^L> 




PENINSULA POULTRY DISTRIBUTORS, Inc. 



AROLINE 



Eviscerated Poultry Cornish Game Hens 

Western Turkeys Beltsville Turkeys 

Call— ANDREW BLASCO— Plaza 2-0287 
221 S. Howard Street Baltimore 1, Md. 



THE SOUTHERN PLATE (j LASS (0. =s== 

' ^//aii ana <J\J\£.tal C-onizactoxi 

2519 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE IAcAVHTC Q 79flfi 

BALTIMORE 17. MARYLAND LAFAYETTE J-/ZUU 



November-December, 1959 



33 




Saj 

Vierrj Christmas 

with (lilts 

from Sears 

North Avenue BE 5-3960 

Mondawmin LA 3-2500 

Ritchie Bi-waj ST 9-6700 

Baltimore 



o 




Finer Foods Since 1858 




igr 

Washington, D. C. 

•■Hi" i -i l Eating Place of the Alumni 

1107 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

Next to the Mayflower Hotel 



B) S\i I N I \ni\ ()(,ni N 

The last smell ot burning leaves, the 
football season drawing to a close, and 
the chill in the air tells us that Christmas 
and the Holiday Season is fast approach- 
ing. 

The stores are filled to overflowing 
with beautiful domestic and imported 
gifts making it easy to find the right 
things for "the hard to shop for"' friends 
or relatives and a feeling of well being 
and happiness prevails. 

We stopped for dinner at HARVEY'S 
RESTAURANT, at 1107 Connecticut 
Avenue. Northwest in the nation's cap- 
ital after a long day and decided to dine 
in the charming barbecue room where 
you can relax while steak sizzles and 
the wonderful aroma fills the air. 

We talked to the new owner of 
Harvey's, Mr. J. Brickman, who offi- 
cially took over the restaurant in June 
of this year, from the estate of the late 
Jules Lully. 

Under the able directorship of Mr. 
Brickman. the life of the Harvey Res- 
taurant has been revived and it seems 
to have all of the old charm and gra- 
cious hospitality that existed during Mr. 
Lully's time. 




AfcuvL 

IUvdd 



WARN ER'S 



20 E. BALTIMORE STREET 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



# 



an. 



Ma^ufla^ui 



incidentally, Mr. and Mrs. J. Brick- 
man's daughter. Jill, is a Freshman at 
the University ot Maryland in the 
School of Education. 



In Baltimore, we shopped at SEARS 
in the Mondawmin Shopping Center. 
The store was sparkling with Christmas 
decorations and everything took on a 
festive air. 

We found a number of beautiful gifts 
and we stopped in the Fur Salon long 
enough to realize that Sears has gone 
into the better fur business. 



If you are looking for furniture as 
gifts for Christmas, visit the WILLIAM 
P. STEIN FURNITURE COMPANY, 

401 North Charles Street in Baltimore. 
It is one of Maryland's finest furniture 
stores and their stock is elegant. This 
well known firm has achieved a reputa- 
tion in the effectiveness of design and 
decor for the home that is equal to 
none. 

Their well organized staff will assist 
a homemaker in carrying out color and 
design for proper room balance. Their 
staff will also advise customers about 
the proper size and color of furniture 
which is to go into a room. 

Even though the furniture in a home 
is of good quality, if the wrong furni- 





AT STEIN'S 








1 ¥■ 




"Tallies to 1 

live with" 

make excellent 

at ANY 




This well i!cm 
■t ^. >1 ul mahogat 
issortmcnt ol <«. 
<nr floors. 

WM. P. 

101 N. (HA 

Baltii 


jned 

ly, iv 

Casil 

n.ibl 

ST 
RLI 

luirt 


popular Pembroke, 
just nne ol .1 large 

n.il tables now on 
v priced .it 54.00 

EIN. INC. 
!S at Mulberry 

• 1. Md. 



34 



the Maryland Magazine 



Wi 



amen 



lure covers or wall paper is in bad taste. 
the charm of a room is lost. The Wm, 
P. Stein Company will help you select 
your wall paper and furniture covers to 
make perfect balance thus accomplish- 
ing a pleasing effect. 

Where the firm carries a full line of 
very elegant furniture for the most 
exacting, they also have furniture to 
suit every purse and purpose, but here 
you will also get expert guidance and 
consultation trom experienced people 
who have gained a state-wide reputa- 
tion in know how. 

The firm is headed by the very cap- 
able William P. Stein, a Baltimorean, 
who organized the firm in 1934. 

ARNOLDS VILLAGE SHOP, 6034 
Baltimore Boulevard, Riverdale, is the 
place to shop for the "men in your 
life." There is a complete line of sports 
wear, beautiful leather gift items, out- 
standing accessories that can help the 
most exacting shopper make her selec- 
tions. The Arnold Village Shop is 
owned and operated by Ralph M. 
Arnold. His charming wife, Helen, is 
on deck to lend a helping hand most of 

the time. 

* * * 

The MOON PALACE RESTAU- 
RANT at 3308 Wisconsin Avenue, 
Washington, where you can get food 




MOON 
PALACE 



Washington's Most Dignified and 

Unique Chinese & American 

Restaurant 

That Is Truly Different 

• Intimate Cocktail Lounge 

• Authentic Chinese Foods 

• Superb American Cuisine 

• Private Party Facilities 

■ Fast Home Delivery Service 

• Ample Free Parking in Rear 

• Open Daily and Sunday 

3308 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EM 2-6645-46 
Member of Diner's Club 





delivered to your home or apartment 
during these busy holidays, has an in- 
teresting legend in connection with their 
name. 

The Legend of the Moon Palace is 
a classic Chinese tale concerned with 
(hand O, a mythical beauty, who be- 
came angered with her husband's con- 
tinual attention to warfare. In order 
to punish him Ch'and O swallowed a 
magical pill belonging to her husband 
which gave her power to fly away to 
the Moon. There she remained as an 
"Immortal in the Palace of the Moon." 
The God of the Immortals then re- 
warded her warrior husband for his 
valor with the "Palace of the Sun." On 
the 1 5th day of each month, it is said that 
the husband and wife meet at the Moon 
Palace. The brilliance of the moon at 
the epoch reflects the meetings of male 
and female in the heavens. Love results 
in children and immortality is achieved 
through them as Shakespeare later hint- 
ed in his sonnets. 




Ofc* - 




A MANO SWARTZ 
MINK STOLE 

from $199 
225 N. Howard St., Baltimore 

Prices plus tax 
Furs labeled country of origin 



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
x x 

1 A LITTLE BIT OF NORWAY | 

IN MARYLAND | 

X 

BERTHA L. KNUDTSEN'S GIFT SHOP x 



x 

X 
X 



X 
X 

Hand made decorative Sweaters and Socks for the Collegian and Sportsman X 

X 

• China and fine Glassware from Norway JJ 

• Native dolls in hand made costumes 



• Seal Skin Ski Shoes 



X EVNA ROAD, PARKTON, MO. 



X 
X 

Tel.: Flanders 7-5519 x 

X From Baltimore drive north to Towson, out on the Harrisburg Expressway to Route 137, turn X 
X right to Mt. Carmel road, then left and drive 2 miles to Evna Road, make a right turn and ride X 
X about a mile and the mailbox will show the name Knudtsen, turn right. X 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



Vulaqe, Shop 
PRINCt 6E0RGH RNt5T MEN'5 WfAR 5T0R& 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 

Dobbs Hats - Bostonian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

UNion 4-1312 



November-December, 1959 



35 



UNIVERSAL ELECTRO 
PLATING COMPANY, Inc. 

In Old Georgetown Since 1929 

SPECIALIST 
n 

ANTIQUE 
SILVER 

Copper and Brass Restoration 
Quality Work — Prompt Service 

Hours: 9 a.m. to 530 p.m. dolly 

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday 

C/i block Below M St. N.W.) 

1067 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 
FE 3-2460 Washington, D. C. 





BLACKIE 



ffaiMoffal 



1217- 22nd STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



AVIGNONE FRERES 

Town and Country 



Caterers for 

Luncheons - Teas - Dinners 
Weddings & Cocktail Receptions 

Candy and Other Delicacies 
Gift Packages and Baskets 
Shipped all over the World 

Restaurant 

Luncheons - Dinners 
At Reasonable Prices 

1777 COLUMBIA ROAD, N.W. 

Columbia 5-0332 Washington, D. C. 



# 



<M 



Ma/u^land lifamesi 



The Moon Palace invites you to enjoy 
the delight ot tasteful Chinese dishes 
prepared in the tradition of the harvest. 



Preparing the Yule Log — hanging the 
mistletoe — trimming the Christmas tree 
— all follow the long shopping daw 

But, ranking right along with the big 
bird itself as the high point of any 
Christmas dinner is the dessert. Christ- 
mas desserts vary from home to home. 
but the most popular of all are steaming- 
hot plum puddings topped with the 
dab of brandied hard sauce and a sprig 
of holly, or maybe covered with aged 
brandy which was set afire just before 
the dessert was brought to the dining 
room. 

Plum pudding is probably the best 
known of all Christmas desserts. Amer- 
ican housewives can buy the size plum 
pudding they want from a 4-ounce con- 
tainer to a two and one-half pound size. 
The pudding is all ready to serve except 
for being heated in its container just 
before it is brought to the table. But this 
was not always the case. The first plum 
pudding was known as frumenty. Six or 
seven hundred years ago the people of 
Wales made frumenty of wheat Hour 
and water seasoned with cinnamon and 
sugar, and given additional flavor by 
the addition of plums and currants. 

The custom was to make this mixture 
a few days before Christmas, let it 
settle, and then serve it in large bowls 
as the first food eaten by a family on 
Christmas morning. Other ingredients 
were soon added to frumentv. and it 



soon became a plum porridge. The spe- 
cial significance attached to this food by 
the superstitious people o\ that da\ was 
that the grain of wheat embodied the 
'spirit immanence." and the spices — 
which were verj costly in those davs — 
symbolized the gifts carried by the \\ ise 
Men at the time ot Christ's birth. 

During the reign of Queen Anne — 
1702 to 1714 — the product changed 
from a liquid to a solid. Incidental!), 
these were also the days of Dr. Lister, 
who did much toward improving the 
diet of the British people, and the world- 
famous quality food house ol CROSSE 
& BLACKWELL came into existence 
at this time, the firm now located at 
6801 Eastern Avenue, in Baltimore. 

Actually, it was not until 1875 that 
plum pudding, as we know it today. 
came into existence. 

Certain humorous customs have 
grown up around Christmas desserts. 
too. As in some parts of the uorld 
Christmas is celebrated over a twelve- 
da) span beginning with Christmas Day 
and ending with the Epiphany, it is said 
that for every mincemeat pie in a dif- 
ferent home during the twelve days of 
Christmas, a happy and prosperous 
month will follow. It is also said that he 
who gets a holly berr> with his portion 
of plum pudding will have good luck 
through the coming vear. 

These customs and traditions are in- 
teresting, but we certainly can be 
thankful that firms like Crowe & Black- 
well prepare plum puddings and mince- 
meat lor us and save us hours in the 
kitchen. 



4> 



"Washington's Best Restaurant" 

Holiday Magazine ( 4th Consecutive Year) 

"One of America's Ten Best" 

Salional Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

Where Statesmen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 

Between the Washington & Willord Hotels 



Telephone Ol. 7-6467 
Five Beautifully Appointed Rooms Catering 






^ 



Established For 



36 



the Maryland M a g a z i n t 



School ct 


DENTISTRY 


(Continued from page 33) 



>nal, stale, and local 



to 



member of the natior 
dental societies, the Gorgas Odonto- 
logical Society and Omicron Kappa 
Upsilon, honorary dental society. 

The Alumni Association pays tribute 
Dr. Ramsey, a good teacher and 
friend, and congratulates him upon re- 
ceding the new honor of Fellow of the 
American College oi Dentists. 

Alumni Reception 
and Cocktail Party 

1 he Alumni Association of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, held a 
most successful reception and cocktail 
party in the Astor Gallery of the Wal- 
dorf Astoria, September 14th. This 
affair, held in conjunction with the 
Centennial Celebration of the American 
Dental Association, attracted more than 
700 alumni, wives and guests. All 
seemed to thoroughly enjoy the occa- 
sion for it provided them with a won- 
derful opportunity to renew old ac- 
quaintances and to chat about many 
things — past, present and future. These 
social gatherings are becoming almost 
too successful. The Alumni Association 
did not expect quite so many friends, 
which heavily taxed the capacity of the 
room thereby limiting maneuverability. 
However, when one considers that this 
party was "on" the Alumni Associa- 
tion, we should not have been too sur- 
prised to find that we had far more 
triends than we thought. In any event, 
"All's well that ends well," and this 
may very well be the end of free 
cocktails! 

Alumni Breakfast in New York 

For a number of years it has been the 
custom of the Alumni Association to 
arrange a breakfast meeting in the city 
where the national convention of the 
American Dental Association is being 
held. We were fortunate this year, 
thanks to the efforts of our secretary, 
Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio, to obtain the 
beautiful Sert Room at the Waldorf 
Astoria for the occasion. It was indeed 
an inspiring sight to see, as one ap- 
proached the entrance to this room, a 
long queue extending well into the 
lobby; all waiting to purchase tickets 
for the breakfast (imagine, $4.50 — 
(Continued on next page) 



CATERING 

---W nli \ SPIvClAL Tmirli 

Party Pork ups for Any Occasion or 
Fully Serviced Affairs 



COCKTAIL PARTIES 



OPEN HOUSE 



RECEPTIONS 



BUFFETS 



TEAS 



PICNICS 



LUNCHEONS 



BANQUETS 




the Casual GateniHXf service 

7651 Old Georgetown Road BETHESDA, MD. 

OLiver 6-1533-4 



oA cWell Pressed 3\ian ^ears a ^Kat 

SOUTHCOMB 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 

Stetson Ties 




109 E. BALTIMORE STREET 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



LExington 9-5799 




gfgfl Silver Spring Piano Co., Inc. 



FAMOUS MAKES — New and Used 
SPINETS CONSOLES GRANDS UPRIGHTS ORGANS 

Special Discount to Faculty end Students of University of Md. 
857 Pershing Drive JU. 9-6338 Silver Spring, Md. 



Terms Arranged 



CHEZ ALBERT 

FINEST FRENCH FOODS 

6470 ADDISON ROAD, S.E. 

Washington 27, D. C. 

REdwood 5-8325 

Proprietor — Albert Bosc 



TRAOC MARK 



5, 




'cnoneid v_ompanu inc. 

O/er/ma Diwerware 

Carle* a! Pleasant Sis ^alllmore-I.Md 



November-December, 1959 



37 




Fiction 

Non-Fiction 

Children's Booka 

Educational dames 
and To i/s 

Stationery and 
Greeting Cards 

Religious Hooks and 
Bibles 

"Baltimore's Cultural /V/>/. Store' 



\ WE rV ' n«l( Ma " 0n ^ ' , ' ,on • 0, ^«" »l>lpptd prcmplfy. 
ON All lO O*" \ W flr t for fr.t took Coiolo, 




BOOK STORE 

516 N. CHARLES STREET 

Phone SA 7-7280 

Baltimore, Md. 



HOSPITAL 
EQUIPMENT 

THE 

COLSON-MERRIAM 

COMPANY 

MUlberry 5-2847 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



Jj^aril-Sii'on School 
Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 

805 X. Charles St. VE. 7-1155 

Baltimore. Md. 



juice, scrambled eggs, potatoes, coffee — 
no meat!). Approximately 300 were 
present. 

We were honored to have with us. 

Dr. and Mrs. Perc) Phillips ol New 
York, the retiring President ol the 
American Dental Association, and Dr. 
and Mrs Paul H. Jesench. ol Ann 
Arbor. Mich., the incoming President. 
After a leu appropriate remarks, Dr. 
Harry Dressel introduced the others 
seated at the head table: Dean Myron 
S. Aisenbcrg ol our Dental School; Dean 
J. Hen Robinson. Dean emeritus of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 
Dental School. U. of Md. and the 
School of Dentistry, West Virginia Uni- 
versity; Dean Harry B. McCarthy, Col- 
lege of Dentistry, Baylor University. 
Dallas, Texas; Dean Frank S. Houghton. 
School of Dentistry. Loyola University. 
New Orleans; Dr. Daniel F. Lynch. 
Washington, D. C, Past President of 
the American Dental Association; Mrs. 
E. Benton Taylor. Donor of the E. 
Benton Taylor Scholarship; Dr. Kath- 
arine Toomey, Administrative Assistant 
in our Dental School; Dr. Howard Van 
Natta, Baltimore. Alumni Treasurer: 
Dr. William F. Decesare, Providence. 
R. I., Alumni First Vice President; Dr. 
Joseph P. Cappuccio. Baltimore. Alumni 
Secretary; Dr. Edwin G. Gail. Balti- 
more, Past President of the Alumni 
Association; Dr. Kyrle W. Preis, Balti- 
more, Alumni Editor. 

Distinguished alumni seated in the 
room were asked to rise on recognition 
and when Dr. Wylie I. Smith, Clifton. 
N. J., Class of 1912, was called out as 
being possibly the earliest graduate from 
our school in attendance, his candidac\ 
was quickly challenged by more than 
half a dozen others equally proud of 
their ancestry and antiquity, including 
Dr. J. Stephenson Hopkins of Bel Air. 
Maryland, a graduate of the Dental 
School. University of Maryland. Class 
of 1905. 

On such a happj note ended another 
successful alumni event to be recorded 
in the histors ol the oldest dental school 
in the world. 



Orientation Program i or i l >(->3 

W hen a student begins his studies in an\ 
new school his mind is natural!) occu- 
pied with main and varied thoughts, 
both hopeful and fearful; this is a most 
natural human reaction, which can be 
put to useful advantage. The degree to 
which one hopes and fears serves some- 
what as a barometer which indicates 
the depth ol sensitivit) and powers ol 



C^ueru ^Jabte KJverlooliS 
I' iilureSttiiv C ounlrii.Sulc 

Olney Inn 

"Old Plantation Recipes" 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 
(Clou 'I Monday*) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

BRIDGE PARTIES. WEDDINGS, 

BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

— Ample Parking Space — 
PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

GntTBUDB Allison Bkewster, 



FRANKLIN UNIFORM CO. 

Uniform Satisfaction 

PHYSICIANS DENTISTS NURSES 

MAIDS WAITRESSES BEAUTICIANS 

— Stores Located — 

235 PARK AVENUE 900 11th ST N.W. 

BALTO. 1, MD. WASH. 1, D.C. 

MU 5-7222 EX 3 8200 

712 E. GRACE ST. 515 BOUSH ST. 

RICHMOND 19, VA. NORFOLK 10. VA. 
Ml 4 2685 MA 7-3639 



MUlberry 5-2823 Established 1876 

eSmiin * HSook <Stoxe. 

MEMBER ABAA 

OLD, RARE AND OUT-OF-PRINT BOOKS 

MARYLAND BOOKS - SCHOLARLY BOOKS 

805 N. HOWARD ST. 

Baltimore 1, Md. 

ALLEN W. SCHULTZ 



R 


ussell W. Smith 




Genera/ Insurance 




ROOM 1100 
501 St. Paul St. 

Baltimore 7, Md. 
lEx.ngton 9-0020 



38 



ihl Maryland Magazine 



perception not unimportant factors in 
achieving academic success 

The orientation program which took 
place in the Dental School on Septem- 
ber 2 1 was planned to alla\ (he tears 
and raise the hopes ot ( >s students be- 
ginning their studies in dentistry. 



College of 
ENGINEERING 



R, M Rivello 




Mr. Timberlake 

TlMBERl AKE AWARDED 

Army Fellowship 

Turner G. Timberlake has been award- 
ed the Secretary of the Army's Research 
and Study Fellowship. 

Timberlake is a 1941 mechanical en- 
gineering graduate. He was awarded the 
Tau Beta Pi Engineer Award in 1940 
and was a member of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, National Collegiate Leadership 
honorary, and Pi Delta Epsilon, National 
Collegiate Journalism honorary. He was 
also active in student publications serv- 
ing as Sports Editor and Acting Editor 
of the Diamondback and Editor of the 
Freshman Handbook. Timberlake at- 
tended the University through a Na- 
tional 4-H Club Rural Electrification 
Scholarship which was awarded him in 
1936. 

Recently Timberlake was nominated 
and selected for "Who's Who in Engi- 
neering." He is the author of numerous 
technical papers and periodicals appear- 
ing in nationally recognized technical 
magazines. During the past year he was 
also recommended for the Seventh 

(Continued on next page t 



LU M BER 
• MILLWORK 

• BUILDER'S II ARDW ARE 
• PITTSBURGH PAINTS 

"Silver Spring's iirst Lumber Yard'' 




SILVER ^^T SPRING 
BUILDING SUPPLY CO 



8226 GEORGIA AVENUE AT RIPLEY ST. 
JUniper 9-2300 SILVER SPRING, Ml). 



nn 



MP. 



2345 Sherman Ave., N.W. HU 3-5200 Washington, D. C. 

Specializing in all of the 
Great Brand Names in 



1111.11 FIDELITY 



Visit Our Sound Room — Plenty of Free Parking 



WASHINGTON PLY- RITE CO. 

Established 1924 

Waterproofing Engineers 

31 K St. S.E. LI 6-7900 

Washington, D. C. 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SUGRUE — PRES. 



NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY. Inc. 



SALES 



iZSVV/ 



SERVICE 



8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK. MO. 



November-December, 1959 



39 



KOESTER'S 
TWINS 

PLEASE 



TERMITES? 
R.04* Man" 




PEST Control SINCE 186 



C. Waltkr I'orter, Mgr. 

SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. IIUNkMN STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



Career in Business 

Day & Evening Classes 
Complete Courses 

Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

Stenographic, Junior Accounting. 

Write or Phone for Catalogue 

STRAYER COLLEGE 
18 N. Charles St. LE 9-5626 



Annual Rockefeller Public Service 
Award. 

During the course ol studs involved 
in the Research and StiuK Fellowship, 
Timberlake plans to conduct extensive 
studies m this country, England, Ger- 
many and Russia, lie is to investigate 
ke\ factors concerning produceabilit) 
as related to reducing the transition 
time from actual concept to ultimate 
hardware production QOW in excess ol 
seven years. One of the objectives of the 
study is to determine the feasibility ol 
establishing standards lor use in con- 
ducting production reviews oi design 
drawings, establishing production meth- 
ods, and needs lor special tools or fabri- 
cation apparatus. 

rimberlake is Chief, Mechanical En- 
gineering Department. U. S. Army En- 
gineer Research and Development Lab- 
oratories, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He is 
married to former Helen May Bryan ol 
Chevy Chase, Maryland, and is the 
lather of two girls. Christine, age 12. 
and Diana, age 9. 



Guy Kidweli. in India 

Ciuy Kidweli, "43, is plant manager for 
the National Carbon Co., Ltd. (India) 
in Lucknow, India. The company is a 
subsidiary of Union Carbide. Mr. Kid- 
well was in charge of the purchase of 
the plant machinery, did the layout 
design of the buildings and supervised 
their construction, directed the modifi- 
cation and installation of the equipment, 
and trained the workers. The plant is 
manufacturing 400,000 flashlights per 
month. He has been spending his vaca- 
tions in the foothills of the Himalayas 
and on tiger hunting trips. 



Doctorate Program Approved for 

Aero, and Civii Departments 

The University Senate has given ap- 
proval for the Aeronautical and Civil 
Engineering Departments to grant the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. This 
brings the number of engineering de- 
partments granting the doctorate lo five. 
The other departments already having 
such a program are Chemical Fngineer- 
ing, Electrical Engineering, and Me- 
chanical Engineering. 



Kiwi hi Ivans Joins Phu ( 

Mr. Kenneth .1. Ivans. M.T. Aero. 
Option '44. has recentlv joined the Gov- 
ernment and Industrial Division of the 
Philco Corp. as Government Sales Man- 



The ECONOMY 

CHAMP 




GIVES UP TO 53 MltES PER GALLON 
FIAT 600 SEDAN 

I ryl. o.ii.v. reai engine. S<-at- 
l comfortably. Boater, «ind- 
■hieM eriper ami direction licnti 
■tandard Mjnipuient. :i etkei 

modi'K a\ ailahle. 



Priced C 

From 



1189 



ONLY $100 DOWN 

Bonk Rate Financing 

A. D. ANDERSON CITY OLDS 

4636 Edmondson Ave. — Route 40 

At Edmondson Village LO. 6-8800 

BALTIMORE, MD. 




HOTEL $t)PPLY CO. 

EST Purveyors of Fine 1927 

MEATS ■ POULTRY 




BALTIMORE. MD. 



King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING 6 OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



40 



r h E M a r v i \ n D Magazine 



ager for advanced military systems. Mi 
I vans was formerlj Plans Manager ol 
the Advanced Design Division ol the 
Martin ( o. From 1950-54 he was an 
aeronautical research design engineer 
with the U. S. Navy Bureau of Aero- 
nautics. \\c has also done graduate work 
in engineering administration at George 
Washington University. 



\ It K.OSHKIN TRANSI 1 KKII> 

Victor S. "Vic" Koshkin, Ch.E. '51, was 
recently transferred to the Richmond. 
Y.i . plant o\ E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Co., Inc. where he will be assigned 
to the Sprague Technical Lab of the 
Textile Fibers Department's New Prod- 
ucts Division. Mr. Koshkin has been a 
Senior Engineer with the company since 
1956 and was formerly employed at 
the Company's Kinston, N. C, and 
Buffalo, N. Y.. plants. He is a member 
ol the American Chemical Society and 
a past president of the Kinston Toast- 
masters' Club. 



R. YV. Ai i EN 
Completes Doctorate 

Redfield YV. Allen, who received his 
B.S. in 1943 and M.S. in 1949 in 
mechanical engineering at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland has completed work 
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree 
from the University of Minnesota where 
he studied under Dr. Hans Eckert. He 
has returned to his post at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland where he is Associate 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



Aeronautical 
Engineering Expands Program 

A new and expanded program of grad- 
uate study in aeronautical engineering 
is being offered in late afternoon classes 
at the University during the fall semes- 
ter. Classes, seminars and research in 
this program are pitched at high pro- 
fessional levels leading to master's and 
doctor's degrees in aeronautical engi- 
neering. 

The courses, including advanced aero- 
dynamics, propulsion and theoretical 
mechanics, are taught by a team of seven 
distinguished engineers under the head- 
ship of Professor A. Wiley Sherwood. 
The classes are open to qualified stu- 
dents who have been admitted to grad- 
uate study in aeronautical engineering 
by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

(Continued on next page) 



Bank of Bethesda 



BETHESDA, MARYLAND 
OLiver 4-4000 



>*' s •"■'*« 



DRIVE-IN BRANCH 

• Four windows 

4830 Cordell Ave. 
Bethesda 14, Md. 



A 

til 

a 














Helms Concrete 
Pipe Co. 

Alexandria, Va. 



STERLING 
LIGHTING CO. 

Gift Ideas For Those 

Who Love Things Of 

Beauty 

LIGHTING FIXTURES FOR 
YOUR HOME 



403 N. Charles Street 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



LE 90222 



The Best 
'Northern Chinese 

Food in the 
^Nation's Capital 

paUace 



"We Entertain 

More Diplomats Daily 

Than the White 

House" 

International 
Cocktails 

Yenching Palace 

3524 Conn. Ave. N.W. 

(at Porter St.) 

EM 2-6358 Wash.. D. C. 



F. A. Davis & Sons 


WHOLESALERS 


Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 


Kitchen & Dining Equipment 


Soda Fountain Supplies 


119 S. HOWARD STREET 


Baltimore 1, Md. 



November-December, 1959 



41 



• 
• 



BE \ 

\\ ISI. 
SANTA 




( live i lie gifl thai 

grow$! 



• 

• 



si. n i .1 ii. n nil-, the 

W new baby, teach the youngsters thrift « 

through linn own savings b 
+ HIGHER Dl\ IDENDS SWEL1 + 

I 111- BALANI I FAS! IK 



• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

• 



AND DON'T FORGET 
s OURSELF A LITTLE 
EAI ii w I I K GROW) 

FRATERNITY 

FEDERAL 

Savings And Loan Assn. 
764-770 Washington Blvd. 

• Higher Dividends • I'SI.K Insured 

• 3 Di ive I |i> • Park Free 

• Speedj SA\ E-bj MAIL 



II i 



Dailj 9 to 2; 

I K 1 1 ).\^ s HI 8:30 P.M. 



• ••••••• 



• 
• 

• 
* 



VISIT 

Bernie Lee's 

PENN HOTEL 

( Newly renovated) 

OPEN DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 a.m. 

serving 

BREAKFAST 

LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

.5 — Spacious Banquet Rooms 
Call VA 3-0300 for reservation 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
PACKAGE GOODS 

l."> W. Penn. Avenue 
TOW SON, MARYLAND 

FREE PARKING 



MARYLAND CHIEF 



TOMATOES 



Packed 

By 

J. LANGRALL & BRO. INC. 

CANNERS SINCE 1878 




A L C A Z V R 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 



W. G. Mullen 1 1 \( hing 

Mr. W. (i Mullen, who received his 
MS degree in civil engineering in 1951 
from the University ol Maryland, has 
returned to the University as Instructor 
in Civil Engineering and will work lor 
his doctorate in this held. Prior to re- 
turning he was a professional engineer 
with Madigan-Hyland, a firm of engi- 
neering consultants. Mr. Mullen was 
a Stephen Stepaman Lellou at the Uni- 
versity from 1949 to 1951. 

Si itvii i Niws 

Robert E. Karns. "57. and Melvin E. 
Schwarz, '58, have recently completed 
the eight-month officers 1 basic course 
at Marine Corps Schools. Quantico, Vir- 
ginia. 

Robert \V. Kissling, "57. recently re- 
ceived his "Wings of Ciold" as a naval 
aviator. He entered the service in 
February. 1958. 




m/mmimmmmmm 

Officer Candidate Karns 




AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD 




W'aihington's Moit Distngnished 

Rtitaurant 

Year Round Air-Conditioning 

COMPLETE DINNERS 

Alto /• ' a turing 

' Arroz Con Polio 

• Polio En Mole • Enchilodos 

■ Tomoles • Tocos • Poerco Ado Vodo 

Complete Bar • Open 7 Days 

— TWO LOCATIONS — 

2603 Conn. Ave. N.W. 

One block from Shoreham & Sheraton 

Pork Hotels 

HO 2-4550 

and 

20th & Pennsylvania, N.W. 

Three blocks from the White House 

EX 3-9049 

Washington, D. C. 



'SAY BOSS'' 

It's Pride that makes the Difference 
in Any Business 

Clean, neat, safely dressed workers 

HAVE FEWER JOB ACCIDENTS 

BETTER COMPANY MORALE 

BUILD PRESTIGE 

BOOST MORALE 

EASTERN'S Low Cost Rental Work Clothes 
— With Complete Laundry Service Con 
Help Moke The Difference For You Too. 

Call Today - - - ED. 6-5700 

Eastern 
Overall Cleaning Co. 

2806 WILKENS AVE. 
BALTIMORE 23, MD. 

For A Cleaner Baltimore — 

Ask About KEX Dust Control" 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 

ond ACCESSORIES 

Let our well-trained staff assist you 

in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 S CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area since 1919 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 



The "Handy" Line 



Baltimore, Md. 



42 



thi; Marvi and Magazine 





Officer Candidate Schwarz 



Johnson Appointed Manager 

Anthony M. Johnson, Jr., Ch.E. '50, has 
been appointed Assistant Marketing 
Manager for the Systems Division of 
Beckman Instruments, Inc., Anaheim, 
California. He previously served as 
Manager of Systems Applications Engi- 
neering. 

Johnson is a member of the American 
Chemical Society, American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers and the Instrument 
Societv of America. 



Sykes at Fort Bei voir 

Paul Sykes, Ch.E. '59, has taken a posi- 
tion in the Mine Warfare and Barrier 
Branch of the Military Engineering De- 
partment. U. S. Army Engineer Re- 
search and Development Laboratories, 
Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 



School of 

LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



Herbert Hammond 
Elected President of Farboil 

Herbert Hammond, 36, has been elect- 
ed President of the Farboil Company, 
in executive action taken by the com- 
pany recently. Mr. Hammond moved up 
from the post of Executive Vice Pres- 
■ ident. He replaces Mr. Milton Swartz, 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1959 




PETROLEUM STORAGE TERMINAL 

PINEY POINT, MARYLAND 

The only deep water terminal receiving ocean-going tankers 
devoted to serving the Washington area exclusively. 

INDUSTRIAL FUEL OILS ChevrOn GASOLINE 

STEUART PETROLEUM COMPANY 



LINCOLN 3-4300 



WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



McLeod & Romborg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

— •— 

CUT STONE 

— •— 
Bladensburg, Maryland 



JUniper 9-4580 



JUniper 9-3340 



A. MYRON COWELL Inc. 

MASONRY- CONTRACTORS 

8416 Ramsey Ave. Silver Spring, Md 



TH0MSS0N STEEL CO., Inc. 

5106 Baltimore Avenue 
HYATTSVILLE, MD. AP 7-3201 



43 



founder of the company, who was elect- 
ed ( hairman oi the Hoard ol Directors 




Save at tlu- strong insured 
Perpetual by using the 

popular "save-by -mail" 
plan. ('lis turners from 
every State in the Union 
and from -11 foreign coun- 
tries. Excellent dividends 
paid quarterly. Write for 
free postage paid enve- 
lopes and forms. 

PERPETUAL 

lluililimj AHHoriation 

washington, 4 d.c. 

ii:h'hiV " 

$300 MILLION 





STUDEBAKER • PACKARD 
MERCEDES BENZ 

Serving Prince Georges County 

for 23 Years at the same 

location — Just south of 

University of Maryland 

COMPLETE AUTO REPAIRS 

FOLLIN MOTORS 

7201 Baltimore Blvd. UN 4-1500 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Open 8 a.m. lo 9 p.m. 



SOUTHEAST TITLE CORP. 

■ 

I'M \- 

■in Years Experience 
COMPLETE SERVICE 

Washington, D. C. & Maryland 
s, tilenu 

R* ill fcnttttt 5 
mid Titit 1 ' - I 

1343 Good Hope Rd., S.E. 

LUdlow 1-3200 Washington, D.C. 



TOWER 9-620 : 



JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading as 

KIERNANS 

1 t 'ompL U I ■ • ••' B 

8200 Boltimore Blvd College Pork. Md 




Mr. Hammond 

rosi n ( omm1 nded 
for Outstanding Work 

Bernard L. Rosen. "47. was recenih 
given a $250.00 Superior Performance 
Award for outstanding work at the Phil- 
adelphia Quartermaster Depot. He is 
attorney-adviser in the Depot's Legal 
Office. 

In presenting the award. Major Gen- 
eral Webster Anderson. Depot Com- 
mander, praised Mr. Rosen for his pro- 
fessional skill, knowledge and initiative, 
and said he had contributed greatly to 
the successful operation of the Depot. 

A veteran of over eight years Gov- 
ernment service. Mr. Rosen began work 
at the Depot in 1957. During World 
War II he served with the 63rd Infantry 
Division in Europe. During the Korean 
War he was recalled to active dut\ as 
an officer and was separated in 1953 
as a captain. 




JACK Q. LEVER AND 
COMPANY, INC. 



Mechanical 
Contractors 



5507 Randolph Rd. 
ROCKVILLE, Ml). 



PURE 

Meat Products 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 



For Advertising Space in 
MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Contort 

SALLY L. OGDEN 

2500 Wisconsin Ave, N.W. 18 W. 25th St. 

Woshington, D. C. Boltimore, Md. 

FEderol 7-2113 HOpkins 79018 



Mr. Rosen 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

I"u<> Mila North — Un iv e j «Hj Maryland 

AAA Open Year Round 

Hot Water }!• 
-: Foods from our Restaurant 

WEbster 5-48SJ 



44 



the Maryland Magazine 



Mr. Rosen aKo received lm Bachelor 
ot Arts degree in 1940 from the Uni- 
versitj ot Maryland. He is a member 
of the Federal Mar Association, the 
Jewish War Veterans and the B'nai 
B'rith, ami a former member ol the 
Baltimore Bar Association. 

Wiiii i in Civil Si k\ [( i 

Four graduates of the School of law 
have taken positions as Claims Exam- 
iners (Disability and Death) with the 
Department oi Health. Education & 
Welfare. Bureau oi Old-Age and Sur- 
vivors Insurance. They are: Richard V. 
Kendall. '56; George Robert Carr, '55; 
John J. Forbes. Jr.. '53; and Charles C. 
1 yons, '2 l ). 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



McInerney at Mayo 

Gerald T. McInerney, '58, has been 
appointed a fellow in medicine in the 
Mayo Foundation at Rochester, Minne- 
sota. 

Dr. Krantz on Research Council 

Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr.. Professor of 
Pharmacology and Head of the Depart- 
ment at the School of Medicine, has 
been appointed a member of the Na- 
tional Research Council, to represent 
the American Society for Pharmacology 
and Experimental Therapeutics in the 
Division of Medical Sciences. 

The appointment, which is for a 
three-year term, was made by Dr. 
Detlev W. Bronk, President of the Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences, on nomina- 
tion of the Academy's Division of Med- 
ical Sciences. 

Serving on AFEB 

Faculty members of the School of Med- 
icine have been appointed to direct two 
commissions of the Armed Forces Epi- 
demiological Board, a civilian medical 
board at the Department of Defense 
level whose members serve as consult- 
ants to the Army, Navy, and Air Force 
in problems relating to the control and 
prevention of disease and injury. 

Dr. Theodore E. Woodward, Profes- 
sor of Medicine and Head of the De- 
( Continued on next page) 



HARRIS & BROOKS, Inc. 



EXCAVATORS 



2413 Blue Ridge Ave. 



LO 5-0867 
LO 5-0868 



Wheaton, Md. 



RAY GAINS STEEL CO 




SPECIALIZING IN 

REINFORCING 

STEEL 

PLACING 

1617 R St. S. E. LU 4-1855 

Washington, D. C. 



Thompson Furniture Co. 

Furniture of Quality 

at Reasonable Prices 

MODERN & PERIOD 

SIMMONS, KROEHLER, THOMASVILLE, 
BASSETT, GEM CRIB & CRADLE, LANE 

1810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E. 
Washington, D.C. LA 6-1622 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete 

AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 
MARYLAND, VIRGINIA AND 
WEST VIRGINIA 

Member A.R.W. 
HO. 2-2600 

• WASHINGTON 9. D. C. 




S. A. GATTI & SONS, 
Inc. 

Institutional Grocers 
3125 V STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

LA 6-8234 



Class 1928 

Insurance of all Kinds 

UNion 4-1100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



November-December, 1959 



45 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

ITS THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 
3°o Interest on Savings 

• 

Administration Building 

6495 New Hampshire Ave., 

Hyattsville, Md. 

HYATTSVILLE — SILVER SPRING 

JUniper 8-5000 Member F.D.I.C. 



DORSET 

CONTRACTING CO., 

INC. 

1508 Hamilton St. 
AP 7-2488 Hvattsville, Md. 



Murray Hardware Co. 

Your Hardware Department 
Store 

Open Daily »» to 9 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

UNIVERSITY BLVD. and 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 

LANGLEY PARK. MD. 
HEmlock 4-3000 



KIDWELL & KIDUJELL, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 

WEbOer 5-4500 MO. 



paitment, has been appointed Director 
ol the \i I H < ommission on Epidemio- 
logical Survey. He ia also a member ot 
the (ommission on Riekettsi.il Diseases 
and associate member ol the (ommis- 
sion on Immunization. 

Dr. Charles I . Wisseman, Jr . Profes- 
sor ol Microbiology and Head of the 
Department, is the new Director of the 
AFFB (ommission on Rickettsial Dis- 
eases. He is also an associate member 
ol the (ommission on Immunization. 

[he A I I H was started in World War 
I as the Arm) Epidemiological Board. 
to combat the outbreak ol influenza. Its 
members are outstanding specialists in 
communicable diseases and metabolic 
diseases of epidemiological significance. 
I he commissions, or working bodies, 
plan and organize research on specific 
disease groups, with the financial support 
of the Armed Forces 



Dr. Amherson at Woods Hole 

Dr. William R. Amherson. who retired 
recently as Professor of Physiology and 
Head of the Department, is now at 
Woods Hole. Massachusetts, where he 
is conducting research on the physiology 
of muscle at the Marine Biological 
Laboratory. His work will be supported 
by the Institute of Arthritis and Meta- 
bolic Diseases of the National Institutes 
oi Health. 

Dr. Amberson's research interests in 
recent years have been related to fibrous 
muscle proteins, particularly the long 
chain protein molecules of skeletal 
muscle. 

In 1950 he discovered a new type ol 
fibrous muscle protein and his present 
work for the National Institutes of 
Health is to determine its physiological 
function and its location within the 
ultrastructure of the muscle fiber. 



Dr. I mi in 
Conducting Protein Research 

How living cells build the body's giant 
protein molecules out of combinations 
ol approximately 20 different amino 
acids is being studied in the Department 
of Biochemistry with the support of 
continuing grants from the National 
Science Foundation and the U. S. Public 
Health Sen ice. 

Dr. Arthur J. Emery, Jr.. Assistant 
Professor of Biochemistry, who is con- 
ducting the research, has been awarded 
a two-year grant ol $10,000 from the 
National Science Foundation to investi- 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WOR 




*qn« 



Desi gners 



vJkz***** 



"°WT OLIVET 



ROAD 




PORCH & TERRACE HANI) 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 




CUARD YOUR 
FAMILY 



GIUE 

TO FIGHT 

[HIKER 



AMERICAN 
CANCER SOCIETY 



JOHANNES & MURRAY 
Silver Spring, Md. 




modern 
machinists co. 

Genera/ Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGN 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington D C 



Bon Ton 

SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON SARATOGA 
CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 
Reor— 1229 D St . S E 

LI 3-4648 Washington 




46 



ihl : Mmoi \m) Magazine 



gate the waj in which ribonucleic acid 
(RNA) is involved in protein manu- 
facture. 

\\ <>\ll \\ Ci in I'Kl SI N is 

I ho Yorkewood Women's Club of Bal- 
timore recently presented a check for 
$200 and an etching to Dr. J. Edmund 

Bradley. Professor of Pediatries and 
Head of the Department. 

The cheek is to be applied toward a 
fund to provide special nursing for chil- 
dren undergoing open heart surgery. 

The etching. "Follow Me." by Thomas 
Muir. is to hang in the rotunda of the 
fifth floor of University Hospital. 

Dr. Kuypers Delivers Paper 

Dr. Henricus Kuypers. Associate 
Professor of Anatomy, recently pre- 
sented a paper at a symposium held by 
the Central Institute of Brain Research 
in Amsterdam. The Netherlands. 

The symposium, which dealt with the 
neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and 
neurochemistry of the cerebral cortex, 
was held to celebrate the fiftieth anni- 
versary of the founding of the Institute 
by the late Dr. C. U. Ariens-Kappers. 

Dr. Kuypers' paper, "Cortical Pro- 
jections to Somato-motor and Sensory 
Cell Groups," dealt primarily with or- 
ganizational differences within the nerv- 
ous system. These differences have 
arisen in the process of evolution from 
cats to primates (a group of animals 
which includes the human species). 

Such organizational differences in the 
nervous system may be related to clin- 
ical differences in behavior that have 
been observed in various animals and 
man following damage to the brain. 

Dr. Kuypers' paper dealt further with 
feedback mechanisms from the cortex 
of the brain to the sensory cell groups 
through which the brain receives its 
information. 

Progress of the Library Building 

The exterior of the new building for 
the health sciences is practically com- 
pleted. Work on the interior will con- 
sume additional months, but it is hoped 
that by the end of 1959 the library 
collections may be moved into the new 
building. The moving will involve com- 
bining all books from the present four 
library units (medicine, dentistry-phar- 
macy, nursing, psychiatry) and from 
five different storage locations. 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1959 



BARBER & ROSS CO 

EST. 1876 

2323 - 4th St. N. E. Washington, D. C. 

DEcatur 2-0501 



FREE DELIVERY 



FREE PARKING 



SUPPLIER & DISTRIBUTOR OF THESE MAJOR ITEMS 

Builders Hardware — Power Tools — Package Homes 

Major Appliances — Structural Steel — Lumber 

Jalousie Doors — Aluminum Windows — Millwork 

Paint — General Hardware — Kitchen Cabinets 

Metal Bucks & Doors 





For Your Enjoyment 






MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM 






• Rich, smooth, 


S£mm 


C^yB^JJ^I?Cw. Delicious 

^Jnj ' Taste Treat 




a f-T^ f^ T*\ J *r\ f" r '' r '' r * Occasion. 




Ill 

WjJ Meadow Gold Products Co. 




•^ ^^&r~ ^^B^S^ a^ f or Our Flavor Of The Month 



• WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 



HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUnipei- 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Sprint/" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co. 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



WINDOW ■ ON ■ THE ■ KITCHEN 

Kitcltete/ua 

SELF-SERVICE 

Delicious food . . . All our desserts are 
home-made . popular prices 

no tipping . . . air conditioned 

BREAKFAST ■ LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee Sc 

Open Daily and Sunday 

11th Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 

Uth & E Sts., N.W. Washington, DC 



cup 



47 




L note Lnnrav inq. 
tor JLroiirams 



a J\ )i\aazi 



aziucs 



ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



V 



Hendlers 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 






CARRYOUT SHOPS at 
Cold Spring Lane & Loch 

Raven CH 3-5253 

Mon-Daw-Min Shopping 

Center LA 3-7766 





Charles St. below 25th 

BE 5 8744 BALTIMORE. MD. 



WArfield 7-8538 

HEATING 
PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
JOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF, Inc. 



6313 • 46th Ave. 



Riverdale. Md 



"Ol I) Ml l>l( \l Ml II l)IS(,' 
( HANGI s N \MI 

What uas former!) called "the old 
building," "the building with the col- 
umns," "the amphitheatre," and perhaps 
main other unofficial names, a building 
king without .in official name, has re- 
ceived the baptism "Davidge Hall" and 
will hereafter be so-called. 

Davidge Hall now becomes the olli- 
cial address Oi the School Ol Medicine, 
as the offices of the Dean and the Com- 
mittee ol Admissions are housed in this 
edifice, located at 522 W. Lombard St. 



Visi i inc. Professor Joins Siwi 

Dr. I.orin J. Mullins. on leave ol ab- 
sence as Associate Professor ol Bio- 
physics at Purdue University, has been 
appointed Visiting Professor of Bio- 
physics in psychiatric research at the 
School of Medicine. 

Dr. Mullins is working in the labora- 
tory of Dr. Robert G. Grenell, Profes- 
sor of Psychiatric Research at the 
Medical School, where he will pursue 
his primary interest, study of the struc- 
ture and function of the cell membrane 
— especially, that of the nerve cell. His 
work will be supported by three grants. 



School of 

NURSING 



Lillie \f. Largey 



Practical Nursing Division 
Hoi ns Com mi ncemeni 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins. President o\ the 
University, was the principal speaker 
at the Commencement Program of the 
Division of Practical Nursing of the 
University's School of Nursing, held 
September 23 in the gymnasium on the 
5th floor of the Psychiatric Institute. 

Dr. Elkins spoke on the importance 
of practical nursing. He also awarded 
the certificates of graduation to the 21 
students as the\ were presented b\ Dr. 
Florence M. Gipe, Dean of the School 
of Nursing. 

Mrs Mattie Rogers Pollard. Presi- 
dent of the Alumnae Association, 
brought greetings to the graduates. Mrs 
Doroth) Justice. Assistant Director of 
Practical Nursing, presented the honor 



53rd ANNIVERSARY 
Organized 1906 




ARUNDEL FEDERAL 

SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

• 
Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Sate Deposit Boies 

Community Hall tor Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 doily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. ELgin 5-9300 



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



ZSSKAV 

1* quality wm 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spiee 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Buildinp. 
Wm. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDIE CO. 



ACME 
TILE COMPANY 

Terrazzo 
Tile — Marble — Slate 

A. F. Pizza 

PL 2-3554 908 Trinity St. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 





American Disinfectant Co. 






Pest Control Service 






928 EYE STREET. N.W. 






Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 





4\ 



in i Maryland M agaz 



student, who received an award from 
Do. in ( iipe. 

Music w.in provided bj Mr. ( harles 
I Haslup, Professor oi Musk- ,ii State 
reachers College, rbwson, and I Ik- 
Reverend Francis \l. robey, S.J., de- 
livered the invocation and benediction. 



Ai H MN \] Nlll I S 

Nellie Pardew Connelly, '55, visited 
Baltimore in Juno with her husband 
and two children. Thej arc living in 
Holbrook, Massachusetts. 

lean Harver Jolel. '54, has returned 
to Baltimore from Bagdad with her hus- 
band and children. 

Miss Ellic Urban. '57, will begin 
graduate school at Harvard University 
this September. 

Miss Betty Cooper is now a regular 
officer in the U. S. Public Health Ser- 
vice. Her first assignment will be on an 
Indian Reservation in the Dakotas. 

Mrs. Kathryn Robinson Fitzgerald 
is now residing in Salisbury, Maryland, 
where her husband, Dr. Joseph Fitz- 
gerald, is now in private practice in 
internal medicine. The Fitzgeralds now 
have two children, Karen who is three 
years old, and Joseph, Jr., who is nine 
months. 

Miss Shirley Wolf, '56, has recently 
returned from Viet Nam. Miss Wolf 
was sent to this country with a team of 
physicians and one other nurse to aid 
in clearing up chest surgical cases in 
which surgery was long overdue. 
MEDICO requested and sent this group. 

Miss Carol Hosfeld, '50, presented a 
paper at a Convention at Walter Reed 
Army Medical Center for the nurses 
of the Armed Forces. The presentation 
Was entitled, "Concepts In Nursing." 



Graduates Remain at University 

Fifteen of this year's graduating class 
are remaining on the staff of University 
Hospital. They are as follows: Miss 
Baumgardner in surgery on the fourth 
floor; Miss Dietz, Miss Huntley, and 
Miss Krongard in Psychiatry; Miss 
Howard is working with the Artificial 
Kidney Team; Mrs. Bundy and Mrs. 
Fleming are working in Obstetrics; Mrs. 
Kripinsky is working in the Obstetric 
Tumor Clinic; Miss Niland in the Re- 
covery Room; Miss Rhowedder in Med- 
icine; Miss Russell on the Cardiovascu- 
lar Surgical Team; Miss Reynold, Mrs. 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1959 




Completely Modern 

Throughout For Your 

Dining Enjoyment 

Ledo 
Restaurant 

2420 UNIVERSITY 
LANE 

HyaHsville, Md. 
Superbly Prepared Food 



* AMERICAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE 
• PIZZA PIES BAKED TO ORDER 
* BEVERAGES AND MIXED DRINKS 



Phone: HArrison 2-8622 



• COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
• INCREASED SEATING 
• BANQUET FACILITIES 

Phone: HArrison 2-8122 




OLES 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



Jjalt'unore s 1 ioneer Envelope ^Manufacturer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. ADams 4-3979 











WALLOP 


a n 


d 


SON 






J. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 




J. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, 


3rd 








Class 


ot 1919 






Class of 1942 












— INSURANCE- 












Fire 


- Automobile - Life • 


Accidei 


t - 


Liability - Bonds 












EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — 


COUNTRY WIDE 




1101 


VERMONT 


AVE., 


N.W.— Suite 405 


Executive 3-1400 WASHINGTON S, D. C. 



BETHESDA CINDER BLOCK 
MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

Complete Line of 

MASONRY SUPPLIES 

BRICK - CINDER BLOCK 

River Rd. at B & O R.R. OL 4-1616 

BETHESDA, MD. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St. S. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

Virgina 



and South 
Northwest 
and Suburban 
Baltimore 



Phone 
Lincoln 3-8151 

Phone 
LOckwood 5-3556 



MEdford 3-6500 
OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 
MARYLAND 



49 



CARLEA 

HKAND NAME 



Sanitatioa Chemicals 

AND 

Janitor Supplies 

SIMON 1/ 

— Cleaners and Waxes 

BRILLO 

— Steel Wool Floor and 
Hand Pads 

BLACK & DECKER 

— Commercial 
Vacuums 

GENERAL 

— Electric — Floor 

Scrubbing & Polishing Machines 

CARLEA JANITOR SUPPLY CO. 

516 W. Franklin St. 
MU 5-5608 Baltimore 1, Md. MU 5-5269 



Ottenberg's Bakers, 

Inc. 

Quality Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 



INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



r* 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Druggist 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



L_ 



RESTORFF MOTORS 

Sales /VCJ-4-+4' Service 

7323 BALTIMORE BLVD • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK, MD 



Smith and Mrs. Legler on the Neuro- 
surgical I cam. 



School of 

PHARMACY 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenhos 




Mr. Lindenuui 

Lindeman Joins Eli Lilly Co. 

Philip D. Lindeman, new salesman for 
Eli Lilly and Company in Salishury, 
Maryland, is working in three states. 
Lindeman's territory includes parts of 
southeastern Maryland, southern Dela- 
ware, and eastern Virginia. 

Born in Honolulu, Lindeman lived 
in California for ten years. His Bachelor 
of Science degree in pharmacy was con- 
ferred by the University in 1956, and he 
became a registered pharmacist in 
Maryland the following year. 

Since 1956 Lindeman has been em- 
ployed by People's Service Drug in 
Wheaton, Maryland. 

He is a member of Phi Delta Chi, 
professional pharmacy fraternity. 



Wins Lecture Award 

1. Thomas Reamer. '24. has been 
awarded the 1959 Harvey A. \\ Whit- 
ney Lecture Award for "his outstanding 
contributions to American hospital 
pharmacy." Mr. Reamer is chief phar- 
macist of Duke University Hospital. 

The award was made at the August 
convention oi the American Society of 
Hospital Pharmacists, meeting in con- 



Student s Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



PLUMBING • HEATING 
• REMODELING 

• APPLIANCES 

Rheem Heating and Cooling 
Equipment 

ii e. mil int. 

2300 Rhode Island Ave., N.E. 
Washington 18, D.C. 

10 Minutes from College 1'ark 

FREE ESTIMATES 

HObart 2-7800 

3402 Welter Rd., Wheaton. Md. 
Wllitehall 6-3400 



NORTH 
\\ ASHINGTON PRESS 

Inc. 

We Specialize in Printing 
for Churches and Schools 

849 Upshur St., N. W. 

WASHINGTON 11, D. C. 

TAylor 9-3932 



SEALTEST FOODS 

Division of 

National Dairy Products Corp. 

For the "Best" in Dairy Products 

Buy Sealtest 

ADams 2-101 1 



50 



the Maryland Magazine 



junction with the 1 00th convention ol 
the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. It was established in honor of the 
late Mr. Whitney, founder ol the ASIIP. 
ol which Mr. Reamer was President in 
1950-51. 



College <> i 

PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION, 
RECREATION 
AND HEALTH 

Dean Lester Fraley 

Chavez at LSU 

Ricardo Chavez, M.A. '58, has been ap- 
pointed instructor in health and physical 
education at Louisiana State University 
in New Orleans. LSU in New Orleans 
began its second year of operation this 
fall. An enrollment of more than 2,200 
students was expected for its freshman 
and sophomore classes. A $7 million 
building program began this fall on its 
178-acre lakefront campus. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College of Special and 
C '( mtinuation Studies) 

G. Allen Sager 



Keeping Up With the Alumni 

Major Walter R. Greenlaw, '57, is the 
new information officer of the 52d 
Artillery Brigade and of Fort Wads- 
worth. He recently served at Fort Myer, 
Virginia. 

Colonel James B. Silman, '54, has 
been named executive officer of the 
Richmond Quartermaster Depot. He 
recently returned from Fort Shafter, 
Hawaii, where he was Chief, Programs, 
Budget, and Reporting Division. Col. 
Silman also holds an M.A. degree in 
International Relations from George- 
town University. 

Major Walter Zaharevitz, '53, was 
awarded the degree of Master of Arts 
in education by Miami University, Ox- 
ford, Ohio, in summer commencement 
ceremonies. Major Zaharevitz has been 
on special assignment from the U. S. 
Air Force. He achieved straight "A" 

(Continued on next page) 



i ■ ■ i ■ • ■ • • ■ • •■ • • ■ 



|YORK BUILDING PRODUCTS CO., 

Inc. 

Manufacturers of 
Superior Concrete Masonry Units 



Phone York 8-2818 



York, Pa. :: 



COME VISIT OUR NURSERIES AND GREENHOUSES 

130 acres of many types of evergreen, flowering shrubs, 
shade trees. Many varieties of cut flowers in season, 
Corsages always available at — 

RIDGEVILLE NURSERIES, INC. 

Ridgeville, Md. Phone Mt. Airy 40 BTTTITTTT^i 

On U. S. Route 40, only 32 miles west of Baltimore 

SEND FOR FREE CATALOG 




NORMAN S. 

EARLEY & SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 

435 E. BALTIMORE ST. 
Hagerstown, Maryland 

— CLASS 1947 ^— 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 
A Maryland Institution 



[ fARMERSJ lOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION I 

FEEDS 

SEEDS 

FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



I Feed MO 3-3113 

FREDERICK 1 

I Petroleum MO 3-5422 
THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

Every kind of Insurance 

110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



November-December, 1959 



51 




EST 



msw< 



1900 



Quality 
Fruits 
Produce 
and 
Frozen 
Foods 

HEHRn-KIRKUJOOD 

MUlberry 5-5111 

28-34 S. FRONT STREET 

BALTIMORE 2, MARYLAND 



TEL Pa*k Siloe* 



SOU) - 13th Street 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JU 8-4400 




10 Minutes From Downtown Washington 

• COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

• TELEVISION & TELEPHONE ALL ROOMS 
. ROOM & VALET SERVICE 

. RECREATION ROOM 

• WASHER & DRYER FACILITIES 
. KITCHENETTES 

• 100 PER CENT PARKING 

CIRCULATING ICE WATER 

SIGHTSEEING TOURS ARRANGED 
REASONABLE RATES 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



grades in all his graduate work and his 
excellent academic record resulted in 
Ins election to Phi Delta Kappa, the na- 
tional piolession.il honor. H \ Ir.iteinits 
toi men in education. Majoi Zaharevitz 

is a veteran Ol nineteen se.ns' military 
service. 

Major Leo I McMahon, Jr.. '58, is 
attending a ten-month regular course 
at the U. S. Arms ( ommand and Gen- 
eral Stall' College at Fort I eavenworth, 

Kansas. 

Major Pasquale M. Princigalli, a 

senior at the University, recently re- 
ceived the Army Commendation Ribbon 
with Metal Pendant in recognition of 
meritorious service in Japan and Hawaii. 




Col. Guidera 




Col. Bengel 

Colonel I nomas F. Guidera, '56, and 
I i Colonel Lawrence W. Bengel, '59, 
are attending the Army War College at 
Carlisle Barracks. Pennsylvania. 

Colonel Walter I. Rozamus, "56, is 



R. H. BOZMAN & BROS. 

INC. 



Complete 

Refrigeration & 
Air Conditioning 



Sales & Service 

1046-66 Granby Street 

Baltimore 2, Md. 

BR 6-0770-1-2 



Domino Restaurant 

For the Best In Food 



A HAMBURGER 
A LUNCHEON 
A DINNER OR 
A BANQUET 

Complete Catering Service 



3 



Jean H. Lambert 

WEbster 5-5400 

10280 Baltimore Blvd. 

College Park, Md. 



Setui+uj itudeati and 
aLimtu ajj ike 

Ma-iylortd 
35 l4eo 

lusntiE mr.Hoi.5on 

GUzusiolzt 

Qua 

Pkd luiJUte . . . 
head oj both aunpa-nlei 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 

Hvattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



52 



THE M A RVI A N D M A G A Z I N 1 



presently attending the Army War Col- 
lege .it Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, 
["his senior educational institution pre- 
pares selected officers tor future assign- 
ments to top staff and command 
positions in the Armed Forces and other 
kc\ government positions. The ten- 
month course is scheduled to be com- 
pleted in June. I960. 

c olonel loin B. Hembree, '54. is 
serving as Staff Judge Advocate, in the 
Army's Judge Advocate General Corps 
The Army's legal branch recently cele- 
brated its 1 84th anniversary. 



New Deputy Language 

Supervisor in Europi 

Mr Gunther Schalic, former Instructor 
of Russian at the School for Foreign 
Languages in Leipzig, and Leipzig 
University, has succeeded Dr. Ulrich 
Gronke as the Assistant Supervisor of 
I anguage Courses for the European 
Division of the Overseas Program. A 
former German instructor for the U. S. 
Army in Frankfurt, Mr. Schalic was 
horn in Czechoslovakia where he at- 
tended German and Czech Elementary 
and Secondary Schools. 

After his education was interrupted 
during World War II, he returned to 
school and attended the School for 
Foreign Languages in Leipzig. After 
passing the Russian exam in 1948, he 
taught successfully at the foreign lan- 
guage school and then at the University 
of Leipzig where he took courses in 
teacher training. 

In 1952, he earned his teaching cer- 
tificate and was appointed as an assist- 
ant at the Slavic Institute of the Uni- 
versity of Leipzig. Meanwhile, he studied 
Slavic zoology and literature, concen- 
trating on Russian and Czech. 

Political convictions prompted Mr. 
Schalic to leave Leipzig for West Ger- 
many in 1958. 



Far East 
Division Faculty Meeting 

The Far East Division held its annual 
fall faculty meeting on September 7. 
Labor Day, in the Sanno Hotel, Tokyo, 
under the direction of Dr. Mason G. 
Daly. Director of the Far East Division. 
Dr. Daly welcomed the faculty, espe- 
cially the new members, and spoke 
about the role of faculty members in 
the University's far-flung Far East Divi- 
sion. Dr. Leslie R. Bundgaard, Associate 

i Continued on next page) 



Moving with Care, Everywhere 
by Land \ by Sea * by Air 



DRVIDSOft 

TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. 



• Pre-Planned Moving to take many details off your hands 

• Nation-Wide and World-Wide Service thru United Van Lines 

• Sanitized Vans, protected against germs, insects, odors 

• Saf-T-Pak, cleanest, safest method for fragile goods 

• Palletized Storage, each lot in clean, mobile containers 
BALTIMORE • BRoadway 6-7900 WASHINGTON • LAwrence 9-2700 



Senior Management Advisors 

(Twenty-Five Retired Executives) 

Specialists in all fields of business and the professions . . . 
with long years of successful accomplishment . . . This 
experience now available to assist with your problems . . . 
Write or call regarding this unique and valuable service. 



A Division Of 

THE INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION 

Counselors in Finance and Management 



301 N. Charles St. 
Baltimore 



SAratoga 7-3100 

Maryland 



DIRECT FACTORY 
AGENTS FOR 

M. G. 

AUSTIN 

HEALEY 

MAGNETTE 

MORRIS 

HILLMAN 

SUNBEAM 

RAPIER 

ROLLS ROYCE 

TRIUMPH 

SPRITE 

JAGUAR 

ALFA-ROMEO 

PORSCHE 



SALES 




RVICE 



rORLD'S FINEST 
Sports Touring & Economy j 





1001 CATHEDRAL ST. BALTIMORE, MD. 

LExington 9-1559 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 
SAFETY SUPPLIES 

3501 BREHMS LANE • BALTO. 13. MD. - BRoadway 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



November-December, 1959 



53 





-^" M 




OPTICIAN 

WASHINGTON. C 


7 C 


Diipenimg Eyeglasses 

and Specfoe/ej to 

Alumni and Sfudenli 

Since 1898 

• 

CONTACT LENS SERVICE 

• 

Washington — Bethesda 
orners Shopping Center 
Customer Parking 
Dl 7-7976 



BALTIMORE E MOST 

COMPLETE and EXCLUSIVE 

Black Tie Center 

formal wear 

RENTED — SOLD 
6218 REISTERSTOWN RD. 

Baltimore, Md. 
Fleetwood 8-1142 



Organized 

ROLLING ACRES FARM 

Growers & Processors 
Fancy Restaurant & c; if t Turkeys 

iCryovac Wrapped I 

Frozen Turkeys Year Round 
freshly dressed for the Holidays 

i To save time — orders can be called in I 

VIRGIL R. GRIGSBY & SON 

Phone RE 4-3340 

U.S. 13, 5 mi. N. of Dover 

R.I). 4. Box 239 

DOVER, DELAWARE 



CITIZENS 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

Mi lulu r Ft th nil I)t p08it 

Insura nee Corpora Hon 
a Federal Reserve Hank 

POCOMOKE CITY 
MARYLAND 



Director, Dr. Janus Poppe, Assistant 
Director and Comptroller, and Mrs. 
Jean Bundgaard, Assistant Director ol 
Admissions and Registrations, also took 
pari in the briefings. 

At a facult) luncheon which followed 
the orientation, the group was addressed 
h> three guests representing agencies 
dosel) linked to the work ol the Uni- 
versity.. 

On Tuesday evening, marking the 

end ol the facult) orientation, a large 
reception was held in the Sanno. Ap- 
proximately 200 people attended, in- 
cluding over 50 faculty members and 
man) outstanding guests. 

The following day. the faculty began 
to travel to their scattered assignments 
where the first fall term got underway 
on September 14. 



Staff Changes in Coli k.i P\kk 
Office of University College 

Two members have been added to the 
University College administrative staff 
at College Park. Maryland. They are 
Mr. James Ross Quimper and Mr 
Donald A. Deppe. 

Mr. Quimper was named Co-ordina- 
tor of the new on-campus Evening Divi- 
sion of University College which was 
established last spring. Mr. Deppe was 
appointed to the new post of Assistant 
to the Director of Institutes. 

As Co-ordinator of the Evening Di- 
vision. Mr. Quimper will provide a vital 
link between the University's academic 
department and the rapidly growing 
evening program. More than 550 stu- 
dents are enrolled in 30 classes on 
campus this fall. 

Mr. Deppe will assist Mr. Richard H. 
Stottler. Director of Conferences and 
Institutes Division in planning, organ- 
izing, co-ordinating, and operating vari- 
ous non-credit adult education programs 
in fields ranging from Law Enforcement 
to Space Research and Technology 

Graduating in l l )54 from Lafayette 
College. Mr. Deppe studied for a year 
at the Princeton Theological Semi- 
nar) and then came to the Universit) 
ol Maryland on a fellowship gi\en b) 
the Philosoph) Department. In 1957. 
he completed the Master ot Arts Degree 
in Philosophy at the Universit) ol Mary- 
land. Since l l )57. Mr. Deppe has been 
connected with the Montgomery County 
School system. 

Mr Quimper completed the Master 
ol Vrts degree in Government and Pol- 
itics last spring under the guidance o\ 



(Age4/€UiUinf~ 




EIGHT TWENTY THREE 
FIFTEENTH STREET, N W 



NA 8-7169 

Dinner and an evening of music 

in European Atmosphere 

Imported and Domestic Beers on Top 

Free Parking 

6:00 P.M. to Closing 

1419 Eye Street, N. W. 

• 

NO MINIMUM 
NO COVER NO ADMISSION 



furniture 
Interior Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

Homes and Institutions for 

over 64 years 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU 5-4510 Baltimore, Md. 



"^ 



J 



J- I. 

WELLS 
CO,, INC 

CREOSOTED 

I" R O D U C T S 

— Telephones — 

PI 2-2144— PI 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 




54 



THE M ARYLAND M AGAZIM 



Dr I Imer Plischke, Head ol the De- 
partmenl ol Government and Politics. 
Quimper holds the A.B. degree from 
Loyola College in Baltimore. 

From 1955-57, Mr. Quimper w.is 
Registrar ol the Evening College and 
Graduate Division of Loyola College. 
From 1952-55, he was a reporter for 
the Baltimore News Post and Sunday 
American. 



Tenth Annivmks\ki Overseas 

Just ten years ago this fall, the Univer- 
sit\ of Maryland set a historic precedent 
by offering the first college credit courses 
ever made available to U. S. Armed 
Forces personnel stationed overseas. To- 
day, that program serves more than 
:().()()() part-time students through 150 
centers in 24 foreign countries. 

last year, courses were offered for 
the first time at Iraklion, on the island 
of Crete. They are administered by the 
European Division with Headquarters 
in Heidelberg which also administers 
programs in Ethiopia. France, Germany, 
Cireece. Italy, Libya, Morocco, Norway, 
Saudi Arabia, Spain, Turkey, and the 
United Kingdom. An average of 7,000 
students enroll in 375 courses in 100 
centers each term. 

This fall, the Military Air Transport 
Station at Lajes, in the Azores, joined 
the University of Maryland's overseas 
program. The Azores program is ad- 
ministered by the Atlantic Division 
under the direction of Mr. George J. 
Dillavou, which includes eight other 
bases in six suburb areas: the Azores, 
Bermuda, Greenland, Iceland, Labrador, 
and Newfoundland. More than 600 reg- 
istrations are reported each term in the 
Atlantic Division. 

The Far East Division under the 
direction of Dr. Mason G. Daly was 
established in 1956 when the University 
of Maryland replaced the University of 
California. It now serves 38 centers in 
5 areas: Japan, Korea, Okinawa, Tai- 
wan, and Guam. Enrollments average 
more than 3000 per term. 

Space Institute Held 

Eight of the nation's leading space scien- 
tists lectured at the University of Mary- 
land during an eight-week space and 
technology institute. The program, 
which consisted of a series of lectures 
on successive Monday evenings between 
October 5 and November 23, was de- 
signed to afford local scientists the 
opportunity to meet and hear some of 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1959 



THE 



BALTIMORE ASPHALT 
BLOCK and TILE CO. 



BABCO 

HOT ASPHALT PAVEMENTS 

• private driveways 

• industrial yards 
for • service stations 

• playgrounds 

• parking areas 



general 
contractors 



1320 N. MONROE ST. 

Call: MAdison 3-4346 



BALTIMORE 17, MD. 




OXYGEN COMPANY 

COMPRESSED GAS MANUFACTURER 
ANESTHETIC & INHALATION THERAPY 
GASES and EQUIPMENT 
RESUSCITATION EQUIPMENT 

REPAIR SERVICE 

2900 - . r )2nd Street — Bladensburs, Md. — UNion t-234.") 



We 
DEVELOP LAND 

for 

its 
HIGHEST, BEST 

and most 
PROFITABLE USE 

for 
LAND OWNERS 

and 
INVESTORS 

HARRY A. B0SWELL CO., 

Inc. 

REALTORS 
3718 Rhode Island Avenue 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 
AP. 7-1111 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

15710 Colesville Road 
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



J).) 




f D. C. Ignition ^ 
Headquarters 

Inc. 

• Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and motor troubles 

• Tune up . . . 

• Specialty repairs . . . 

• United Motors . . . 

authorized service: corburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 

Phone: NAtional 8-7038 

1230 20th St., N.W. 

V^ Washington, D. C. ^J 



BRIGGS 

Construction Co., Inc. 

CUSTOM HOMES 

Repairs - Remodeling 

BETHESDA, MO. OL 6-4545 



the outstanding authorities in the \.in- 

ous Belds Ol space research. Representa- 
tives from the Armed Services, private 
industry, and governmental agencies 
were eligible to register lor the program. 
The distinguished lecturers presented 
the latest developments in such areas 
as propulsion, space thght. communica- 
tions, and space medicine. 

According to Richard H Stonier. 
Director of Institutes at the University, 
the program provided the participants 
with a fertile ground tor the interchange 
of ideas among themselves and thus 
served to increase their knowledge of 
their own and related fields of space 
science. 

Japanesi Publish McNelia Book 

The Japanese government commission 
on the constitution has recently pub- 
lished for its use a book in Japanese 
language bv Dr. Theodore McNelly. 
lecturer in Government and Politics in 
the Far East Division. 

The 142-page text is a Japanese trans- 
lation of" 5 chapters of Dr. McNelly's 
Columbia University dissertation on 
"Domestic and International Influences 
on Constitutional Revision in Japanese. 
1945-1946." M r . Shozo Kobayashi of 
the faculty oi Waseda University, Tokyo, 
made the translation and the book was 
published by the Printing Bureau of the 
Japanese Ministry oi Finance. 

In addition to teaching in the bar 
East Division. Dr. McNeil) is engaged 
in research and writing on the history 
oi the Japanese constitution. 

Mink n Dlvn Visits Campus 

Dr. Paul Dickson. Resident Dean oi the 
Munich Branch oi the Overseas Pro- 
gram, recently visited College Park for 
the first time during his three vears as 
.i I niversity official. 

He spent much of his time here be- 
coming personally acquainted with aca- 
demic deans and department heads 
responsible for disciplines taught at the 
Munich Branch. He also conferred with 
University administrators and with 
Colonel Robert (dafka. new Iv appointed 
\ssistant to the Dean for Administration 
at the Munich Branch. 

Dr. Dickson, a retired I S \rmy 
Colonel, holds two Doctors degrees. 
( olonel Dickson was assigned to the 
faculty ol West Point and detailed to the 
University of Munich to complete work 
on his first Doctorate, earning his Ph.D.. 
cum laude, in German, in 1951. He 
completed work tor a Ph.D in Educa- 
tion at Columbia University in 1957. 



COLONIAL CATERERS 

CATERERS 

Wedding 1!i « mm ions - Ti \- 

1.1 \< HEONS - I )l\ NEBS 

.'. • ■ 

HOME PREPARED Tool) 
11 Pine Ave. 

Takoma Park. Md. 
II 9-2188 



Bacon for 
breakfast 




Albert F. Goetze. Inc 

CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore. Md. 



Kramer Hardware 
& Supply 

Hardware • I'hmibing 
Purina Feeds • Sporting Go 

8204 Baltimore Blvd. TOwer 9- 
Collbge Park, Mi>. 

Open Sundays 10 A.M. to 2 PM. 



56 



i n i: M \ r 1 ! ! \ \ n Magazini 



SOCIAL NOT I S 



\\ I DDINOS 



Nancy Nystrom, P.E. '59, who was 
crowned May Queen last spring, was 
married to Dr. William Sails. Med. "59, 
in a ceremony which took place in Uni- 
versity Chapel October 24. Nancy, an 
outstanding undergraduate leader, par- 
ticipated in three May Day ceremonies 
while a student, an unprecedented rec- 
ord. Dr. Sails was graduated first in 
this year's Medical School class. 

Charlotte Ann Kausc, married Octo- 
ber 10 to John Robert Tucker. The 
bride studied at George Washington 
while the groom finished at Maryland 
in 1951, College of A. & S. 

Captain William B. Rea, Ag. '42, of 
Greenwich, Connecticut, to Georgia 
Collier Snively of Akron, Ohio, in 
Munich, Germany. 

Estelle Kernan, Nursing '54, was mar- 
ried to Mr. Willard James Lennox, a 
graduate of the University of Maryland 
Pharmacy School, 1954. They were 
married on August 8, 1959, and are 
now residing in Baltimore. 

Gladys Kinna, Nursing '55, was 
married in January to Dr. Alfred 
Chesler. They are residing in Baltimore. 

Margaret Richardson, Nursing '54, 
was married to Mr. Richard L. 
Wernecke on September 19, 1959. 

P. Dale Every, Nursing '58, was 
married to Mr. James Arthur Yates, 
June 27, 1959. 

Marge Rhowedder, Nursing '59, was 
married to Dr. Hector Romirez in June, 
1959. They are now residing at Crowns- 
ville State Hospital where Dr. Romirez 
is on the Attending Staff. 

Other marriages that took place over 
the summer from this year's graduating 
class of the School of Nursing are as 
follows: Miss Anne Ermer to Mr. 
Charles Bundy in August; Miss Sally 
Fouse to Mr. Bryant Chow in August; 
Miss Mary Lou Cornelius to Mr. Ed- 
ward Reilly in July; Miss Betty Thomp- 
son to Dr. Glen Legler in August. 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1959 



does the 

LION'S 
SHARE 

of House- 
Work! 





Washington's Spare Bedroom For Your Guests 



3L | fy| 

Molar 



„--<»t ,> 

> ft , v 



Open 24 Hrs. A Day 
Swimming Pool 

Phones & Free TV In Each Room 
Suites, Lounges & Conference Roo 
Wall To Wall Carpeting 

On Silver Spiinq 




TOWN 

<jtoleis 

• Tub & Shower In Each Room 

• Individually Controlled 
Heating & Air Conditioning 

• Free Washer & Dryer 

• Sightseeing Tours 

On Jjetnesoa 



76 ROOMS X ^^^ X 95 ROOMS & RESTAURANT 

Cor. 13th St. & Eastern Av. Cor. Wise. Av. & Bradley Blvd. 

JUniper 8-5801 OLiver 4-1400 

TELETYPE # SILVER SPRING MD., 314 



77 Aat/ute/i/e/ 

PRINCE GEORGES 
COUNTY 



<& 



nU sM>i * CORAl HIUS * ""rot 



*^v. 



NK of WARtLAN 



'% 



AND 



*" * "mm . BOWIE « HlU-C' 1 ^ 



*«*■ 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



PRINTING 




LITHOGRAPHING 

57 





ALL WEATHER 
ALL TYPES 

Play "a ours si e <nni 
h • I tin difference. 

Over 25 years' experience. 



Valley Landscape Co, 

Falls Road 
Baltimore 9, Md. 



THE ========= 

LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Ljour ~jTrienalu ^rroili 

.lust eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Phone AP 7-4493 

For Reservations 

Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 
7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MI). 



B. & B. 
EXTERMINATORS, INC. 

SANITATION and PEST 
CONTROL SERVICE 

TERMITE SPECIALISTS 

Phones: LExington 9-2140—9-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



THE 
TOWN 
HOUSE 

"Famoua for Pood l" 
the Maryland Tradition" 

Open Daily 

LUNCHEON, COCKTAILS, 
DINNER 

Howard at 27th HO 7-5191 
Baltimore, Md. 



BlKllls 

lo Ellen Louise and John H. Hoyert, 

Jr., a second son. Mark Sudlow on July 
14. 1059. Mrs. Hoyert, the former E. 
Ionise Sudlow, Ed '50, M.Ed '52. is 
the Secretarj of the Prince Georges 
County Alumni Club, member of the 
Education Alumni Board, and a Past 
President of the Education Alumni 
Hoard. Dr. Hoyert, Ag. '44, Ph.D. '51, 
is in the Agronomy Department of the 
University of Maryland as Supervisor of 
the Tobacco Experiment Farm. 

To Frances and Robert S. Hoyert. 
B.P.A. '50, LL.B. '52, a girl, Margaret 
Ann, on July 31, 1959. Mrs. Hoyert is 
the former Frances Keefauver, Ed. '50. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Marshall Peters (Rita Malimet, Nurs- 
ing) in June of 1959. 

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Speers (Katherine Levint, Nursing '54) 
in September, 1958. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 




Dr. Drake 
Dr. Nathan L Drake 

Dr. Nathan L. Drake. Professor o\ 
Chemistry and Head oi the Department, 
died recently following a heart attack 
on the University's golf course. A native 
ot Watertown. Massachusetts, he was 60 
\ears oi age. 

Dr. Drake was graduated from Har- 
vard LTniversit) with an A.B. degree in 
1920, an A.M. degree in 1921 and a 
Ph.D. degree in 1922. 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 
& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales /.'< ///< : i ii tut i res in 

Principal Ea 



LMIII I \ I. 

^ PIMM ESS 

BOOKBINDING 



Every Type For Every Purpose 

A Complete Printers Finishing Service 
9401 Baltimore Blvd. 

WE 5-6884 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



For the Hobbyist 

x'acto 
hand tools 

• Precision Knives 

• Replacement Blades 

• Tweezers 

• Needle File Sets 

• Razor Saw Sets 

• Scraper Sets, etc. 

WHOLESALE RADIO PARTS CO.. Inc. 

311 \V. Baltimore St. 
Baltimore 1. Md. 
Tel. Ml .V2134 



For fine picture framing 
REMEMBER... 

VEERH0FF 



. Paintings 

• Reproductions 
• Old Prints 

1512 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
DUpont 7-2322 



58 



the Maryland Magazine 






He was awarded a Sheldon traveling 
1 ellowship in 1^22 and a year later was 
appointed a research chemist at Mal- 
linckrodt Chemical Works. In l l >25 he 
u.is appointed research chemist tor 
Procter and c ramble Co. 

He came to the University of Mary- 
land Department of Chemistry in l l >2d 
and in 1940 was appointed Head of the 
Department and a member of the Cirad- 
uaie Council. 

He supervised the building of one of 
the largest and best equipped chemistry 
facilities in the country. A part of the 
Glenn L. Martin Institute of Technol- 
ogy the building was completed in 1950. 

In 1950 he assumed the directorship 
of the University's Institute for Molec- 
ular Physics which is patterned after the 
Van de Waals Laboratory in Amster- 
dam. Holland. The Institute is primar- 
ily engaged in research on gases under 
high pressure. 

Dr. Drake was awarded the Hille- 
brand Prize by the Washington Section 
of the American Chemical Society in 
1947. He was a member of the National 
Defense Research Committee and the 
Committee for Medical Research. In 
addition he held memberships in Phi 
Beta Kappa; the Pequossette Lodge in 
Watertown; Alpha Xi Sigma, profes- 
sional chemical society; Sigma Xi, a 
research society; the Washington Acad- 
emy of Sciences; and the Harvard Club 
of Washington, D. C. He was President 
of the Faculty Club from 1955 until 
1957. 

A measure of the esteem in which 
Dr. Drake was held was expressed by 
Dr. John Toll, Head of the Physics De- 
partment: 

"Dr. Drake was the leader in the 
development of all physical sciences at 
Maryland, and was an outstanding re- 
search chemist and a gifted teacher. He 
was also an exceptionally able admin- 
istrator and one of the hardest working 
and most devoted of the University's 
leaders. He will be completely irreplace- 
able. 

"Although he was primarily con- 
cerned with Chemistry and the Molecu- 
lar Physics Institute, Dr. Drake's sup- 
port and guidance in physics programs 
has been invaluable. For example, he 
was the chairman of the committee that 
planned and supervised the construction 
of our Physics laboratories and in the 
final months much of his time was spent 
in the supervision of the building of the 
new Physical Sciences lecture hall with 

(Continued on next page) 



J. H. De VEAU & SON, Inc. 

General Contractors 



ROADS 

DRIVEWAYS 

PIPE 



EXCAVATION 

BUILDINGS 

CONCRETE 



CONCRETE SAWS 



4100 Jones Bridge Road 



North Chevy Chase, Md. 



Get in touch with us regarding 
the affair you are planning 



Bus. LExington 9-8400— Ext. 216 
Res. MUlberry 5-652.1 



BALTIMORE CHECK ROOM SERVICE 

CHECKING FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

(no function is too large or too small) 

CHECKING FOR HOMES OR HALLS 

DAN MORACO Office Lord Baltimore Hotel Check Room 



ALLIANCE PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

PLUMBING and HEATING CONTRACTORS 

1360 OKIE ST., N.E. LA 6-3753 

WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE CO. 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limestone 
Granite Marble 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 

Washington 18, D. C. 



James II. Kempek Co. 

<^AA,anuTLickux£.r± 

<^J\£.l21£i.£.ntattU£. 

J^u ildina ^- 1 (atsruiLi 

4620 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 
EM 3-2345 Washington, D.C. 

Class of '40 



ADVERTISERS 
MAT SERVICE 

416 Eye St., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

Baked Mats 

Cold-Mold Mats 

Plastic Plates 

Rubber Plates 

Stereotypes 

Thermosetting Plates 

24 Hour Service 
Call Executive 3-5265 




2477 18th St. N.W. 

at Columbia Road 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



November-December, 1959 



59 



The gathering place for 
WaryUinders <>\ Good Taste 

X 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 
1730 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 
STerling 3-1730 

Open 'ill Midnight— Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 



Jfuller & b'Slbcrt 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

HEED 

Since 1920 



Phone — Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Serving Wash., Va. and Md. For Over 
a Quarter Century 

PLUMBING 

HEATING 

AND AIR CONDITIONING 

KITCHEN AND BATHROOM 

REMODELING 

GAS WATER HEATERS 

ATCHISON & KELLER 

INC. 
DEPENOABIE— EFFICIENT— FAIR 

TA. 9-8100 
1246 TAYLOR ST. N.W. 
WASHINGION. D. C. 

Radio Dnpatched Trucks 



his usual devotion, fairness, and atten- 
tion to detail. 

w e .ill share in the sorrow ol the 
abrupt luss ol tins incomparable friend." 

Dr. Drake is survived by his wile. 
I ster; Robert, a son; and his two 

daughters, Mrs. Ruth Davis, ol Hvatts- 
ville, and Mrs. Robert Weston, ot I oil 
Lauderdale. Florida. 



Why 



M1TCHHLJ 



is 




Dr. Jull 

Dr. Mori ey A. Jull 

Dr. Morlcy A. Jull. former Chairman 
of the University's Poultry Committee. 
died recently at the age of 74. 

Dr. Jull served as Poultry Committee 
Chairman from 1936 until 1956. Before 
coming to the University, he was Senior 
Poultry Husbandman of Production Re- 
search with the Department of Agricul- 
ture at Beltsville where he took part in 
the work which ultimately led to breed- 
ing the world famous Beltsville Turkey. 
Dr. Jull has been retired since 1956 
from the University, but has been active 
as Poultry Specialist and Consultant on 
the International Cooperation Aid of 
the United States Government in Leb- 
anon. Greece and Egypt 

Jull Hall, the Poultry Building, was 
dedicated and named in his honor in 
1953. 

He is survived bj his wile, a son. two 
sislers and three brothers. 



Dr. vnd Mrs. Jacob W. Bird 

Dr. Jacob \Y. Bud. Med. "07. and his 
wife were both killed rcccnth in an auto 
accident which occurred near New 
Hope. Alabama. I heir car was struck 
broadside by another car which entered 
the highway from a side road, failing 
to slop at the stop sign there. 



mRRYLRriD'S FMEST CORfl 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



OTHm;, 



SHOE PEG 



or 



SUJEFT 




Packed by — 



F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

rEMYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 




WASHINGTON S 

ONLY 

DRIVE THRU- 
LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

Where You Save Up to 20°o 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Bladensburg Road, N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 
(Across from Sears-Roebuck) 



13 he Shade Shop 

and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Slreel, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FEderal 7- 1200 



Manufacturers and Distributors 

■jf Window Shades 

•ff Venetian Blinds 

if Folding Doors 

if Draperies and Rods 

if Screens 

if Inside Shutters 

•fa Porch Shades 

if Vertical Blinds 

if Decorative Wood Coverings 



60 



I II 1 M A R Y I \ND Mag AZIN1 






I ounder of the Montgomery Count) 

General Hospital. Sandy Spring, Di 
Bird was rccentl) honored tor 50 years 
ol service to Montgomery County. 
Among the guests attending the celebra- 
tion ol that anniversary were \rthur I'. 
Flcmming, Secretary of Health. Educa- 
tion and Welfare, and Governor Tawes. 

Mrs. Bird, the former lean Skinner of 
Kensington, Md., was Dr. Hud's second 
wife. His first wife succumbed to infill 
en/a during an epidemic in l l )2(). 

Dr. Bird held a county-wide drive in 
1918 to establish the Hospital which 
opened in l l )2() during the epidemic of 
influenza. Alter that epidemic. Dr. Bird 
was left with three children to raise 
alone. Remarried in 1935, he and his 
second wife had two other children. 

Dr. Bird was active in the Montgom- 
ery County Social Service league, the 
Health Department, the Tuberculosis 
.md Heart Association and the State 
Welfare Department. He was President 
of the Montgomery County Medical 
Society for two terms. 

He was a member of St. John's Epis- 
copal Church in Olncy, a Mason and an 
alumnus of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fra- 
ternitv. 



Graden Lee Barker. Jr. 

Graden Lee Barker. Jr.. and his wife 
Esther, both 22 years of age, were killed 
in an auto crash near Triangle, Virginia. 
Mr. Barker graduated in Arts and 
Sciences this past June and was working 
at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory at 
White Oak, Md. Mrs. Barker was secre- 
tary to the Chief of Staff at Casualty 
Hospital. The couple lived in Hyattsville 
but had grown up and attended school 
together in Oriental, North Carolina, 
where both were buried on October 26. 
All four parents survive. 



John Earle Rice 

John Earle Rice, age 54, of the Class 
of 1 926, died October 20 of cancer. He 
had been a leading figure in the Potomac 
River Anti-Pollution work. As Chief 
Chemist of the District's Sewage Treat- 
ment Plant, he carried out much of the 
experimental work leading to the design 
Of new ten million dollar facilities estab- 
lished this year. Born in Frederick, he 
became an analytical chemist first in 
College Park and later in Chicago. He 
also saw service in the Army Medical 
Corp. Other activities included the Boy 
Scouts, the American Red Cross and the 
(Continued on next page) 



POOR, BOWEN, 

BARTLETT 8: KENNEDY, INC. 



Insurance & Bonding of every 
description for more than 
half a century 



Policy analysis 
Engineering surveys 
Appraisals 



Phone: LExington 9-6004 

BALTIMORE 3, MD. 

26 S. CALVERT STREET 




Since 1935 



ROADS BY 
DRUMMOND AND COMPANY Inc. 



Phone: Circle 2-3030 



Race Road, Baltimore 27, Md. 



Mama Emma's 

ROMA 

Nationally Famous Italian 

Cuisine 

in "LITTLE ITALY" 

900 FAWN ST. SA. 7-8990 

231 S. High St. LE. 9-8965 

(Two Entrances) Baltimore, Md. 

Open Daily 11 A.M. to 4 A. M. 



Buy Defense Bonds 
Every Payday 

J. H. F. 



November-December, 1959 



61 



Here is how to get 
the EXACT business 
form you need . . . 

Many forms are needed 
in business. But (or 
every situation there is 
only one right type of 
form to use. You can be 
sure of getting this one 
form you need by buy- 
ing from a firm that 
offers a complete line. 
Phone or write for 
samples. 

For an unbiased recom- 
mendation, buy from a 
firm with a COMPLETE 
Line. 




»SCT 
Out I "! 
CAtlON FO»mS 




■ bort reqi^red) 



Baltimore Business Forms 

ID— »o> ol IMi IMTiuolt SAilSJOO* CO»'*Nn 

Phone Gilmor 5-8000 

Talbot (Tol) T. Speer (Class of 1917) 
Charles F. Ellinger (Class of 1937) 



Another First for the Pimlico Hotel 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tantalizing barbecue dishes in the grand 
manner! Choice, tender meat turned 
slowly on o spit over a blazing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
thick, mouthwatering sauce, prepared from 
an old recipe by our own expert chefs! 



Nate's and Leon's 



P 



i m I i co 

HOTEL 



'til 2 a.m. ■ Saturday 'til 3 
5301 PARK HGTS. AVE. BALTIMORE 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1 . Md 



( ongress Heights Methodist Church. 
Survivors ol this outstanding biological 
chemist arc his wife, two sons, his 
mother, a sister and three brothers. 



Dk. Pom i i< P. \ inson 

Dr. Porter P. Vinson, ol Richmond. 
Virginia, uideh known specialist in dis- 
eases of the chest, died recently of 
coronary insufficiency due to coronary 
sclerosis. 

Dr. Vinson was born in Davidson. 
North Carolina, on January 24. 1890. 
He attended Davidson College in that 
place, receding the degree of bachelor 
of arts in 1909 and that of master of 
arts in 1910. He then enrolled in the 
L'niversit\ of Maryland Medical School, 
where he took the degree of doctor of 
medicine in 1914. He was an intern at 
the Trudeau Sanatorium in New York 
from 1914 to 1916. and for part of 
1916 he was an intern in the Montreal 
General Hospital. 

Dr. Vinson went to Rochester. Min- 
nesota, in 1916, as one of the first 
fellows in medicine of the Mayo Foun- 
dation, which had been established a 
year earlier. On April 1. 1921. he was 
appointed to the staff of the Mayo Clinic 
as a consultant in medicine with a spe- 
cial interest in diseases of the chest. He 
came to be regarded as an authority on 
diseases of the esophagus, in particular, 
and by the time he left Rochester in 
1936 he had contributed more than 125 
papers to the medical literature on 
diseases of the chest in general. In 1936 
he entered into the private practice of 
medicine in Richmond. Virginia. 

In Richmond Dr. Vinson carried on 
an extensive private practice of internal 
medicine, and he became a professor 
in the Medical College of Virginia in 
Richmond. He was certified as a spe- 
cialist in internal medicine in 1937 by 
the American Board of Interna 1 Medi- 
cine. Inc. 

Dr. Vinson was a fellow of the Amer- 
ican College of Physicians and a mem- 
ber of the Southern Medical Association, 

the American Medical Association, the 
American Broncho-Esophagological As- 
sociation, the American Association for 
Thoracic Surgery, the Society of the 
Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, the Nu 
Sigma Nu professional medical f rater- 
nil) and the Beta Theta Pi academic 
fraternity. 

Dr. Vinson was married to Miss 
I enore B. Dunlap in Washington. Penn- 
sylvania, on Ma) 14. 19 1 1 ). Dr. and Mrs 
\ inson had three children. 



Clifton D. Mayhew, 
Inc. 

Painting &: Decorating 
Contractors 



?>>%*/' 




3436 Let* High\\a\ 
JAckson 5-6131 

Arlington, Va. 



Thomas & Thompson Co. 

Eftablithtd 1871 

The Downtown 
Prescription Drug Store 

Hove Your Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded by 

PERSCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

at Baltimore and Light Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

— Delivery Sen-ice — 

TELEPHONE 

SAratoga 7-2960 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

I>t /h ridable >■ 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN 8RANCH — Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

MiMr.SK IYi'HiAi. Dsrosri Ins. Corp. 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

Land Planning and Subdivision 

6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK MD 
Telephone: JUniper 9-7508 



62 



the Maryland M a g a z i N l 






Dr. O. w. Schai pp 



Dr. O. W. Schalpp, Med. '07, passed 
aw a\ recently, a victim oi cancer. He 
lived, prior to his death, in Hutchinson. 
Minnesota. 

Dr. Schalpp was a certified radiolo- 
gist, obtaining his certification in l l )4S. 
He had retired from active practice two 
years ago and was acting in the capacity 
of a consultant. 

His assistant of 30 years. Miss Ann 
Dallmann, writes: "We all (the com- 
munity and family) feel a sense of great 
loss. He was the greatest physician and 
a horn student, keeping his interest 
active in his chosen profession, up to 
the end." Dr. Schalpp is survived by a 
son and a daughter. 

Dr. Robert Spurr 

Dr. Robert A. Spurr. a protege of chem- 
ist Linus Pauling, died recently of brain 
cancer at Long Beach, California. Dr. 
Spurr taught chemistry at the Univer- 
sity from 1949 to 1955. For the past 
four years he has worked on research 
for the Howard Hughes Aircraft Co. 
Survivors include his wife, two sons and 
two daughters, and three brothers. 

Florence D. Porter 

Mrs. Florence D. Porter (Florence Dil- 
worth, Nursing '04) died recently at a 
hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. She 
had lived in Jacksonville since her grad- 
uation in 1904. 



Other Deaths 

Dr. Raymond Kent Tongue, Jr., D.D.S. 
'43. died June 11, 1959. 

Dr. Jose Y. de Guzman Soto, of San 
Juan, Puerto Rico; Dr. F. Garcia de la 
Torre, Santruci, Puerto Rico; Dr. L. 
G. Despiav, '07, Santruci, Puerto Rico; 
Dr. Romulo Ayuso, Caguas, Puerto 
Rico; Dr. Nestor de Cardona, Puerto 
Rico. 

Dr. W. T. Messmore, '01, died July 
23, 1959. 

Dr. Page Edmunds, Med. '98, died 
August 7, 1959 at his home at Gibson 
Island, Maryland. 

John H. Eiseman, Eng. '21, died re- 
cently of a heart attack at Suburban 
Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland. Mr. Eise- 
man, a former gas chemistry specialist 
with the National Bureau of Standards, 
was also a leading Mason in the District 
of Columbia and active in the American 
Legion. He is survived by his wife, two 
sons and a daughter. 

November-December, 1959 






MASON CANNING COMPANY, INC. 



POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON. MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



CARL J. WILLIAMS & SONS 

CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 
918 Cooper St. • Salisbury, Maryland • PI 9-5444 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 


Distributors 


Shell Petroleum Products 


Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 


FREDERICK. MD. 



PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE PI 9-5594 



Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



Subscribe to 
MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



THE 

NATI0KAL BANK 
OF CAMBRIDGE 

Complete 
Banking Service 

Organized 1880 

SAFETY DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

Cambridge, Maryland 



_ 



The C0HN & BOCK CO. 

Lumber • Building Material 

poultry FEEDS livestock 

PRINCESS ANNE. MARYLAND 



SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY. MARYLAND 



63 



Directors of Advertisers 



•Vmc Iron Wortu 

Advert. I Dmpan) 

AJvcr> i.e. 



41 

• 

Mka/ji 42 

Alliance Plumbing A Healing Companj 

American Disinfectant Compan) 4s 
tnchoi I enoe) . . . 

\ I) \ndcrson.. 4o 

Arnold's \ Mi s 

Arundel I edcral Saving! A. 1 oan ASSOCU . ... 

fctchison \ Keller. Inc 60 
Alvm 1 Aubinoc I Outside Back I 
Avignonc I rati 

H A H I (terminators, loc . *^ 
Baltimore Asphalt Block & lilt Company. 

Baltimore Business I orma 62 

Baltimore Check Rimrn Service. ... 59 

Baltimore 1 nvdope Companj 13 

Bankof Betheada 41 

Bank ol Cnsticld. 62 

Bank i>l' Maryland 57 

Barber A Ross Hardware Compan) 47 

Bard-Avon School. 38 

C. J. Benson Furnuure Companj 54 

Bergmann's Laundr> 27 

Bethesdan Motor Hotel 27 

Betheada Cinder Block Mi's:. Co 44 

Bladtie's House of Beef 16 

Bon Ton Saratoga Chip Disl 46 

Harrv A. Boswell Company 55 

R H Bo/man A Bro . Inc 52 

( onstruction Co.. Inc 56 

Briggs Meat Product Co 44 

Dexter 1 Br>an. Inc 50 

Buck Glass Company ^2 

Carc> Machinery A SuppK Companj 53 

Carlea Janitor Supply Company 50 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 55 

The Casual Catering Service 37 

D Harry Chambers. Opticians 62 

Chez Albert Restaurant 37 

Citizens National Bank 54 

Thomas I Clark. Inc 21 

Cohn A Bock Company . . 63 

I okeshurv Book Store 

Colonial Caterers , 56 

Colson-Merriam Company ... 38 

County Title Company, Inc 31 

A Myron CoweU, Inc 43 

( ros-i. A. BJackwel] Company 22 

Crown Oil ft Wax Company 63 

\ ictor Cushwa & Sons ; - 

Danny's Formal Wear. . 54 

Davidson TransTa - Company. 53 

I \ Davis A. Sons 41 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters. Inc 56 

Dd-Haven White House Motel 44 

J. H DeVeau ft Sons. Inc <4 

Dietrich ft Ciambnll. Inc 51 

Dietrich Bros.. Inc 

Domino Restaurant 52 

Dorset Contracting Company, Inc. .. . 46 

Diplomat Motel. 21 
Douglas Aircraft Company, Inc 

Drummond A. Company, I K ''I 

N S. Earley ft Son * i 

I asterday-Duckworth Rooting Compa i) "•" 

all t ompanj ... 42 

I dmonds Optician. . 

I lectronk Wholesalers, Inc 

I Mo CO Restaurant 42 

I armers Cooperat s i 

i ii i aben i . 61 

I irst I cderal Savings A ! ilion 

Covet 



I ollin Molon i Packard) . 
I orei| 

I ranklin I niform Compan) 
I ralernitj I cderal Sav I 



44 

J3 

42 

I redcrick Underwriters, Inc 51 

luller A d'Albert. In. 60 

Raj Gains Steel Compan) 45 

s \ Oattj v 45 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Company. Inc.. . 56 
(<ra> C oncr ete Pipe Co mpan ) 

1 lie Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 42 
Hannes I ormal Wear 
Harrington Hotel 

Harris A Brooks, in. 45 

Harvey Dairy. Inc .30 

Harvey's Restaurant . . 

Hcarn-kirkwood 52 

Helm's Concrete Pipe Compan) 41 

Hendler's Ice Cream Company 48 

Robert F. Hoft*; Inc 

Hotel Dnponl Plaza Outside Bask (over 

HulTer-Shinn Optical Companv 2V 

The Industrial Corporation 53 

In I own Motor Hotels 57 

Johannes & Murray .... .46 

Johnston. Lemon A Company ... 31 

James D. Kemper 59 

kidwell & Kidwell. Inc 46 

King Bros.. Inc.. Printing 

The E. H. Koester Bakery Company 40 

Koontz Creamery .Inc 33 

Kramer Hardware & Supply 56 

J. I angrall & Bro.. Inc 42 

Ledo Restaurant 49 

Maurice Lesser Company ; " 

Jask Q. Lever A. Company 44 

A Little Bit of Norway In Maryland 35 

Lord Calvert Hotel 58 

John D. Lucas Printing Company - 

Lustin-Nicholson Chevrolet 52 

Mangels, Herold Company. Inc 5" 

Maria's Restaurant 

Maryland Hotel Supply Company 40 

Mason Canning Company 63 

Clifton D. May hew. Inc 62 

Meadow gold Ice Cream Companv 47 

F. O. Mitchell A Bro.. Inc 60 

Modern Machinist Companv 46 

Modern Stationery Company 42 

Moon Palace Restaurant 

Motel Park Silver 52 

Murray Hardware Companv 46 

Ms I eod A Romborg Stone Co., Inc 43 

McNeill Surveys, Inc 62 

National Bank o( Cambridge. . . .63 

National Dairy Products Corp SO 

N al Equipmenl A SuppK t .< 21 
New China Inn ... 

Norman Motor Companv . . 19 

North Washington Press 

Occidental Restaurant 

Old New Orleans Restaurant. 

Oles Envelope Corp 4*) 

I ■ 

Ottenbi I - 50 

Park Transfer Compan) *2 
aervator) >i Musk 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors. Inc 



Pcnn Hold (Ikrmc let ■). 

Perpetual BuilJu . V 44 

R B Phefcn 

Pimliso Hotel . 

Poor. Bowen. Bartlcti A Kennedy . Inc 61 

Jimmie Poru 44 



Quaint Acres Nu< 
Quisk Strike 1 aundry . 



'I 

i- 1 



4 s 



Refrigeration Suppl. ( 
Restaurant S23. . . 
RcMortf Motors. 
Rev Engraving Col. 
Ridgcvillc Nurseries. . . . 
Rocco'i Charcoal House 

Rolling Asrcs Farm 

Roma Restaurant . 61 

R.'sc Exterminator Co. . 4j i 

Salcwav T railways. , 

Salisbury Milling Company 

Van Rensselaer P S. : .. 
Schofield Co.. Inc. . 
Schluderberg-Kurdle Company . 
Sears. Roebuck A Companv 

Seidenspinner, Realtor . . 

Shade Shop 

Shaffcr"s Convalescent Retreat. . . 

Show Boat Restaurant 

Silver Hill Sand A Gravel Co 

Silver Spring Building Supply ( 
Silver Spring Piano Company. Inc. . . 

Russell W . Smith, Insurance 

Smith"s Book Store 

Smith Welding Company 

Southcomb. Inc 

Southeast Title Corp 

Southern Oxygen Company 

Southern Plate Glass Co 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 

William P. Stein. Inc 

Sterling Lighting Company 41 

Sterling Process. Bookbinders 58 

Steuart Petroleum Companv 

Straver College 40 

Student's Supply Store SO 

Suburban Trust Company 46 

Mano Swart/. Furs. 
Sweetheart Bakers 

Thomas A Thompson Co . 62 

Thompson Furniture Co 45 

Thomsson Steel Company . 
Town Hall Tavern. . 
The Town House. . 

Universal Electro Platinc i 



\ alley Landscape Companv 
VeerhofT Galleries . . 



Wallop A Son. Insurance 49 

w amer's 

Washington Coca Cola Botll * 31 

gton Plv-Rne Companv 39 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange. In. 50 

J. I. Wells Companv. Inc 54 

. :nc Corp. . 
W holesale Radio Parts I . I . 

Perry O. Wilkinson 

W ilhams Construction Co 

Carl J Williams A Sons 

J M. Kenny Willis 

Wve Plantation ... 54 

Yenching Palasc 

V ork Building Products Co . Inc.. . 51 



Duke Zcibcrt's Restaurant. 






64 



THE M \R Y 1 \ \ P MaGAZINI 




THE DOUBLE OBLIGATION. It is to the University of 
Maryland that alumni owe a goodly portion of their opportunities for 
training, education and success. These are the individuals to whom the 
University has given something. By the same token, these are the yardsticks 
by which our University is measured. These, in effect, are the ones to whom 
the University owes its reputation and upon whom the future must be 
established. 



BOUND TOGETHER. The ties are sometimes rusty and thin. 
We refer to those bonds of loyalty which unite the alumni with the Alma 
Mater. At least a portion constantly reach back to seek anew old experiences 
and old connections which will serve to rekindle the past in activity and 
interest of the present. It is the desire to help and be helped, to grow and 
to help in the growth of others that becomes a common bond. 



WHERE ARE WE GOING. The Alumni Association has first 
searched its own soul. Three major questions have brought many and varied 
answers. We now extend our interest area and request all alumni to study 
the following questions and with your answers help us to establish the 
target areas for the future. 

1. What should he the prime objectives of the Alumni 
Association? 

2. What do the alumni want from the University? 

3. What programs and activities should be given priority 
bv the Alumni Association? 



SEND THE WORD. You can give your Alumni Association and 
your University a real boost by simply assisting both in becoming more 
effective. Many have asked what they could do to help. In brief, the answer 
lies in your initial willingness to put down on paper what you would like to 
see others do and possibly what you would like to do yourself. A little 
brainstorming is in order and your thoughts, no matter how absurd they 
may sound to you, are welcomed. Constructive critics are the best friends 
an Alumni Association can possess. This is your opportunity to help us 
grow. Through the nourishment of your thoughts we will not wither with 
neglect. 



WASHINGTONS NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 




HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA 



COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 



Meeting and Banquet Facilities 



DUPONT CIRCLE 
HUDson 3-6000 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 
John J. Cost, Gen. Mgr. 



ALVINL-AUBINOEInc 

• Builder • 



l-.tth Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone: 
HUdson 3-602c 



lumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 




Volume XXXI Number Two • January- February 1960 



.L. 



A Rousing Homecoming • The Early Years • The Maryland Blue Crab 



TEACHING BY TV 

Bell System facilities meet a new need. Already a vital link in filling 
educators' requirements within a locality, state or across the nation 



An interesting current develop- 
ment in education is the use of 
television for instruction— both in 
classrooms and in the home. 

Evidence that a shortage of quali- 
fied teachers is developing coincides 
with the need for some way to meet 
the awakened interest in mathemat- 
ics, physics, chemistry, and educa- 
tion in general — from the elementary 
school to the college level. 

Many educators, in studying the 
twin problem, are thinking more and 
more about the possibilities of Educa- 
tional TV in their teaching programs. 

In transmitting TV lessons and 
lectures from place to place, various 
means are available. Closed circuit 
Educational TV systems between 
schools may be required. Or connec- 
tion between broadcasting stations in 
different cities. Or a hook-up be- 
tween closed circuit systems and one 
or more broadcasting stations. 

Whatever distribution of TV is 
needed, in city, county, state, or 
across the country, the Bell Tele- 
phone Companies are equipped to 
provide it. They have the facilities 
and years of know-how. And the on- 
the-spot manpower to insure effi- 
cient, dependable service. 

1 or oxer three years, the local Bell 
Telephone Company has provided 

the closed circuit ETV network 




HELPING TO TEACH . . . HELPING TO LEARN. Classroom scene in Cortland, N. Y. 

This is one of the schools now using Educational TV. More than one TV receiver 
can be used where teachers wish to accommodate larger classes at one sitting. 



which successfully serves thirty-six 

schools in Washington County. 
Maryland. 

In Louisville, Kentucky, tele- 
phone company facilities now con- 
nect five elementary schools. In 
New York State, they serve a high 
school and seven other schools in 
the Cortland area. 

In San Jose. California, they link 
four schools with the campus of San 
Jose State College. And in Anaheim. 
California, eighteen schools are 
served b\ TV. 

The largest of the many current 
educational TV projects is called 
Continental Classroom. The Bell 



System is one of the business organ- 
izations which support it. 

In this great "classroom.*' about 
half a million people get up early 
each weekday to view a half-hour 
lecture on Modern Chemistry on 
their TV sets at 6:30 A.M. This 
32-week college course goes from 
coast to coast over Bell System lines. 

The Bell Telephone Companies 
believe their TV transmission facili- 
ties and know-how can assist educa- 
tors who arc exploring the potential 
value of educational television. 

They welcome opportunity 

work with those interested in this 
promising new development. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




Maryland 




The ("over: One oi the characteristics ol the decide ol the I950*a and a portend 
ol what the I960's hold in store is the ever-accelerating rate ol research across 
the Nation. At Maryland, expenditures for pure and applied research in diverse 
Heids climbed steadily from $897,484.14 in fiscal year l')4 l » 50 to $5,194,335.08 
m fiscal year 1958-59 just concluded. Everywhere, more and more money and 

men are being used tO expand the frontier ol knowledge. II men can find \\a\s 

to live together peaceably, the decade ol the I960's might verj well become a 
prelude to an era oi great discovery. 

PHOMXiKAI'll in \l DAM (,(,! K 



the 




magazine 

Volume XXXI 



Number 2 



JANUARY FEBRUARY 



1960 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOAR D OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE, Assistant Treasurer 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C EWINGTUTTLE 

WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

HARRY A. BOSWELL JR., '42 President 

MRS. ELIZABETH ROHR SINGLETON, '47, Vice-President 

DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N. W. 
Baltimore 18 Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue 



FEATURES 



2 
3 
5 
8 
9 

12 
13 
14 
14 
15 



WS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



17 
18 

22 
25 
31 
34 
37 
38 
42 
44 
46 

47 



The Alumni Diary 

Alumni and Campus Notes 

Rain Fails to Dampen a Rousing Homecoming 

The Privilege of Giving to Maryland 

The Early Years 

The Maryland Blue Crab 

Do You Remember? 

unselfish devotion to his fellowman . . . 

Maryland Books and Authors 

University Sports 

Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Dentistry 

Education 

Engineering 

Law 

Medicine 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

University College 



Social Notes 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md.. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 



1 111 (ii m ral Alumni Council 

« IIOOL AND COLLEGE 
HI PRESENTATH I S 

m, K II II I I k I 

Paul M Galbreath, '39 

Arthur B. Hamilton. 79 
( layton Reynolds, '22 

\ K I S A SC IENCES 

W. Gilbert Dent, Jr., '26 
( harlcs F. Bllinger, '37 
Di Reginald V. I mitt. '14 

IUSINBSI A PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42 

Ralph W I rev, Jr.. '4 1 
( hoter W. J awney, '3 I 

|i I N I I S I R V 

Dr. Samuel Bryant. '32 
Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Eugene D. Lyon, '38 

EDUCATION 

G. Watson Algire, '30 
Clara Dixon. '34 
Mai i\ Hasslinger, '33 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Dudley D. Taylor, '51 
Arthur G. VanReuth, *34 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mis Miriam Beall, '31 
Mrs. Erna R. Chapman. '34 
Mis \gnes McNutt Kricker. 31 

LAW 

Mary Arabian, '44 
Layman J. Redden, '34 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, Ml 

NURSING 

Mrs. Dorothy K. Herbert, '24 

Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 

Mrs. Elizabeth R. Singleton, '47 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EXOFF1CW MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Victor Holm, '57, Ass't Secretary 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
Joseph H. Deckman, '31, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, *29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 



ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — David W. Bien, '29 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cecil County — Francis X. Chapman, '50 
Cumberland — Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '2 1 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley. '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall. '31 
New England — George Kerlejza. '25 
New York— Harold McGay, '50 
North Fastern Shore — 

Robert W. Downes, Jr., '46 
Overseas— Col. Ralph 1. Williams, "33, '4 1 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold. '34 
Prince Georges County — 

Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix. '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens. 1° 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

Harry F. Vollmer, III, '40 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



The hurrier I go. the behmder I get.'' I his quotation, from a North Can 
lina barbershop, recently crossed my desk. The first reaction was to agr 
that this was more expressive of the life of an Alumni Secretary than anythin 
else I had ever seen. 

The message arrived during the usual happy confusion created by a d 
piled high with correspondence, the telephone ringing as it had been most of t 
day and the need to meet a previously scheduled appointment. On the agen 
were meetings and conferences, speakers to be obtained, notices to be sent, addn 
changes and membership applications to be processed, a family hopefully waiti 
for the evening when Dad would have supper with them and the nudging c 
which said, "The printer is waiting for the Alumni Diary." 

It was in such a period of momentary reflection that I noted another meats; 
pointing to the staggering pace which the great majority now maintain. Here w 
a contrast of the old and the new. The dashing about by air and by automobile, 
the pressure of the high cost of living, the hectic situation of never going to bed 
the same day you get up and the wonder of what may be ahead as man probes 
outer space, is the new. The contrast of 40 years ago recalled eggs at 10c a doze 
butter at 15c a pound and the time when 10c would purchase enough round stq 
to feed five people. The butcher gave liver away, the hired girl got $2.00 a week 
men wore whiskers and chewed tobacco, beer was 5c and a hanging kerosene lamp 
in the parlor was a luxury. Folks had time to visit and to rock a little on a neigh- 
bor's front porch. 

With these thoughts in mind, we pulled from a dusty file, the first history of 
the Alumni Association embracing the years 1893-1914. It could not have been 
better said today. I refer to the introductory statement which reads. "Scarcely 
anything means more for a college than a large and enthusiastic body of alumni, 
who make it their business to get behind every move in the life and extended 
usefulness of the institution. In past years, we have never lacked of loyal support 
from both the older and younger members of the alumni organization but it has 
only been more recent that the Association has felt its responsibility in directing 
the broader development of the institution." 

As a boy, I recall an 82-year-old former slave standing on the steps of the 
Library of Congress and expressing awesome thanks to her Creator that she had 
been permitted to live in "Such an up-to-date centurv." Most of us have seen 
great progress, phenomenal growth in alumni interest and numbers, and the most 
epoch-making period in world history. It is interesting, therefore, to see that 
nearly 50 \ears ago. the alumni message was the same as that which we attempt 
to transmit today. Even then reference was made to. "A period when the organiza- 
tion of alumni into live and influential associations seems both logical and impera- 
tive in their own interest as well as that oi the institution." 

While these words may seem somewhat significant to many presently acme 
alumni, they have doubled in importance for the son of the college editor and 
alumnus who wrote them in 1914. That editor was Reuben Brigham and his son 
has just concluded another Alumni Diary with appreciation for the past and hope 
for the future because alumni fifty years later are just as loyal and as enthi 
as thev were those few short years ago. 

As ever, 



U 



'fa*— ^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazim 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



FEBRUARY 


15 


Basketball — vs. Clemson — College 


3 


Basketball — vs. North Carolina — 




Park. 




College Park. 


18 


Basketball — vs. Duke — College 


6 


Basketball — vs. Wake Forest — at 
Wake Forest. 


20 


Park. 

Basketball — vs. George Washington 

College Park. 


6-10 


Registration for the spring semes- 


23 


Basketball — vs. North Carolina — 




ter — College Park. 




at Chapel Hill. 


10 


Basketball — vs. Virginia — at Va. 


25 


National Symphony Concert— Col- 


1? 


Instruction begins — College Park. 




lege Park. 




Basketball — vs. N. C. State — at 


26 


Basketball — vs. Clemson — at Clem- 




N. C. State. 




son. 



27 



Basketball- 
Columbia. 



-vs. South Carolina — at 



MARCH 

4,5,8-12 University Theater production. 
"Come Back Little Sheba," College 
Park. 
25 Maryland Day. 

30 Easter recess begins after last class 
College Park. 

3 1 National Symphony Orchestra and 
Washington Ballet — College Park. 




annual m club awards banquet, see next page 



anuary - February, 1960 



Anm vi M ( i in Awards 

I he ninth annual "M" Club Banquet 
took place December 5, 1959, at the 
Siutler Hilton Hotel in Washington, 
l) ( I he annua] affair was originated 

as a means ot honoring University of 
Maryland athletes and prominent citi- 
zens m other walks Of lite. Honorary 
membership is extended to men selected 
tor achievements in political, profes- 
sional and business endeavors. 1 ach 
year one nationally recognized figure is 
presented with an additional award tor 
special achievement. 

The Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame 
was instituted by the "M* - Club in 1956 
to honor Maryland athletes who have 
ceased competition for at least 10 years 
in the sport for which they are chosen. 
\ selection is made each year oi three 
living and one deceased (in memoriam) 
athletes. A permanent memorial of 
those chosen for the Hall of Fame is 
maintained in the William P. Cole, Jr.. 
Student Activities Building. 

Chosen this year for the Hall oi 
Fame were Joseph M. George, a na- 
tional senior champion skeet shooter; 
Leonore K. Wingard, an Olympic swim- 
ming champion; Louis W. (Bozey) Ber- 
ger. a football, basketball, and baseball 
star; and, in memoriam. John I. Turn- 
bull, outstanding lacrosse player. 

Mr. George, a political figure in 
Queen Anne's County, has been named 
to several Ail-American skeet teams and 
is an accomplished trick shot artist. He 
entered his first competition at the age 
ot 48. He is a former State Senator and 
ex-member oi the State Roads Commis- 
sion. 

Leonore Right Wingard won 20 Na- 
tional Women's swimming freestyle 
titles from 1933 to 1936. An Olympic 
competitor in the 1932 Games, she es- 
tablished world records in the 880, 440 
and 500-yard events (all three marks 
have since been broken). She is mar- 
ried to Leon J. Wingard, a University 
oi Pittsburgh graduate and a physical 
education instructor. 

Bozey Bcrger was a great all-around 
athlete at the University of Maryland. 
Following his graduation in 1932. he 
v. as signed by the Cleveland Indians as 
an infielder. He concluded his major 
league career in 1939. 

John Turnbull was considered one 
of the greatest attackmen in the histor\ 
ot lacrosse. He was an All-Anierican for 
Johns Hopkins, and later played with 
Mount Washington. Killed in action 
over Germain in 1944. Colonel Turn- 
bull held the Distinguished Fixing 
Cross, the Air Medal and two oak leaf 
cluster*. 



Other awards presented at the "M" 
( lub Banquet include: the Charles P. 
Mc( ormick Award, presented to John 
I Bell, captain ol the L'niversitv ot 
Maryland swimming team; the Talbot 
I . Speer Award, presented to Bjorn An- 
dersen. University indoor and outdoor 
pole vault champion; the A. V. Wil- 
liams Award, presented to Allen J. 
Bunge, the first I erp basketball player 
ever to be named to an All-Amencan 
selection in pre-season; the James M. 
latum Memorial Award, presented to 
Kurt A. Swart/., first string Terrapin 
tackle. 

Honorary "M" Club Memberships, 
presented by Hotsy Alperstein. Presi- 
dent, were extended to Mr. David L. 
Brigham. Alumni Secretary; William 
Campbell, University swimming coach; 
Fdward R. Carr. one of Washington's 
outstanding business and civic leaders; 
Richard E. Koester, President of the 
E. H. Koester Bakery Co.; It. den. 
Bernard A. Schriever. USAF. Com- 
mander, Air Research and Develop- 
ment Command. 

The "M" Club International Award 
went to Deane R. Beman. All America 
Awards were presented to Robert 
Schwartzberg and Deane R. Beman. 
The Atlantic Coast Conference Cham- 
pionship Coaches Award was presented 
to James H. Kehoe. Jr.. track; William 
E. Krouse, Jr.. wrestling: and Doyle P. 
Royal, soccer. 

Lt. Cien. Bernard A. Schriever was 
presented the Distinguished Service 
Award. 



Baltimore Union Room to 
Memorialize Dr. Tongue 

The parents of the late Dr. R. Kent 
Tongue. Jr.. D.D.S. '45, have provided 
for the dedication of one of the main 
meeting rooms in the new Baltimore 
Union Building in his memory. Ap- 
propriate dedication ceremonies will be 
convened when the building is com- 
pleted and furnished. 

Dr. Tongue was born in Baltimore 
in [918. He attended the University oi 
Maryland and the Baltimore College oi 
Dental Surgery. Dental School. Univer- 
sity oi Maryland. His postgraduate 
work was done at Eastman and at Mc- 
Gill University. He entered practice in 
Baltimore in 1949, and he was also on 
the stall' oi the Department oi Ortho- 
dontics oi the Baltimore College oi 
Dental Surger>. Dental School. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

In addition to his parents, he is sur- 
vived by his wile. Barbara Fnlow 



Tongue, and a son. Raymond Kent 
longue, III. 

Dr. Tongue's father heads the Ray- 
mond K. Tongue Insurance Agencv in 
Baltimore. 




Dean Stoma 

Fellowship Named in Honor 
of Dean Stamp 

The National Council of Alpha I ambd. 
Delta has named a graduate fellowship 
of SI. 000 in honor of Adele Hagnei 
Stamp, the University of Marvkind 
Dean of Women. 

The Adele Hagner Stamp Fellowship 
for Graduate Study will be awarde« 
during the 1960-61 academic year. I 
must be used in a college or universit; 
where there is a chapter of Alph; 
Lambda Delta. Any member of Al 
pha lambda Delta graduating in 1957 
1958 or 1959 who has maintained th< 
scholastic average throughout her col 
lege career is eligible. 

Miss Stamp served for man\ years a 
the National Treasurer of Alpha I amhl 
da Delta. It is primarily due to her ef 
torts that the organization is on a sounJ 
financial basis and is now capable 
awarding two graduate fellowships. 



Dean Bamford Namim ro \I\rh 
Movrd of Naii r vi Resources vm 
Orins Boako of Directors 

Dr. Ronald Bamford. Dean ol 
Graduate School and Head of the 

i ( ontinued on pave 1 6 ) 



the Maryland Maga/im 



Rain 

Fails to Dampen 

A Rousing Homecoming 



House Decorations, Floats, a Queen and a Win Over Virginia 
Highlight Maryland's Traditional Homecoming Spectacle 






MARYLAND HOMECOMING SI'IKIIS REMAINED BUL 'i W I DE- 
spite an early morning downpour which had threatened 
to cancel out many events. Student house decorations and 
tloats escaped severe damage to their wire and paper struc- 
tures and presented to alumni perhaps the most inventive and 
dazzling display in the history of Maryland Homecomings. 

Tom Nugent's surprising Terrapins walked rudely over the 
hapless (and winless) Cavaliers of Virginia. 55-12. All in all. 
it was a day to be remembered, full of the sights and sounds 
of the traditional Homecoming spectacle. 

The day began with tours of the new Library and with 
meditation periods in the Memorial Chapel. In addition to 
faculty and staff guides, members of the Pershing Rifles did 
themselves proud in providing both attention and direction 
for returning alumni. 

The excellent and attractively arranged buffet luncheon in 
the lower level of the University Dining Hall was a credit to 
the University and a source of high praise on the part of re- 
turning graduates and their families. 

Dark and threatening skies failed to dampen genuine en- 
thusiasm for the crowning of Maryland's Homecoming Queen. 
Chosen to reign this year was Miss Pat Ohl. a junior in Arts 
and Sciences who spent her first two years of college at the 
University of Maryland's Munich branch. One of the finest 
float parades of recent years brought brightness to the dismal 
atmosphere even though a few crepe-paper colors merged 
to provide new shades for those with an artistic outlook. Zeta 
Beta Tau copped the winner's title in the float competition 
with their "Little King and Terp Slay Cavalier." 





At the football game, the pulling of the right strings, the 
showmanship and the final result all combined to create a stir 
among tans who discussed the game action long after the final 
whistle had blown. Highlight of the game was the carefully 
prearranged but apparently hastily called huddle following a 
Virginia punt with the ball being handed around or across 
the circle of red jerseys to end Gary Collins who suddenly 
hroke from the circle into the waiting arms of an amazed and 
almost dumbstruck Virginia defense who made the stop on 
the basis of training experience rather than through an 
analysis of what was happening. 

The Cole Activities Building served as headquarters for the 
mixer following the game. This included a coffee hour, a 
view of the Trophy Room as well as a viewing of movies of 
the Clemson game narrated by Head Coach, Tom Nugent. 

Most alumni concluded the day with visits to fraternity and 
sorority houses and with auto tours of the numerous house 
decorations. To some, there were memories of many sleepless 
hours when their attention had been directed to the manipula- 
tion of crepe-paper and chicken wire into similar fantastic 
designs all intended to say "Welcome Home" to alumni of 
another era. Alpha Chi Omega's house decorations were 
proclaimed the best of this year's offerings. 

Once again the Dean of returning alumni was Fred Besley 
of the class of 1892 who makes his home in Laurel. He en- 
joyed a lively and complete day even though he, like many- 
others, did not seem inclined to join the younger set who 
participated in the Homecoming Dance at the Armory to the 
music of Billy Mays Orchestra. 





The Privilege of Giving to Maryland 



T 

AH IS Winter and Spring, during the time 

designated for the Annual Alumni Fund Program 

(December through Ma\ ). 

Maryland men and women are showing again 

their loyalty to the Black and Gold. 

They are working in the 

Fund organization 

They are pledging financial 

support 

More than S200.000 has been contributed 

to the fund in its first two years 

of existence. ..true testimonial 

to alumni loyalty. Last year 

more than 1.500 inspired alumni worked 

in the General Canvass. Each year more and more Maryland men and women 

are exercising their privilege to serve 
again their Alma Mater. 



Respond to the Spring General Canvass 

in your region. Make certain that this 

and future generations will continue to 

LOOK TO MARYLAND FOR LEADERSHIP. 



THE GREATER UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FUND 



S the- - Maryland Mag azin i 



The Early Years 



By Dr. Verne E. Chatelain 



AN ACT OF THE GENERAl ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, PASSED 
in the year I 784. just seven years after the ratification 
of the first State constitution and the organization of the 
new State government under it. made reference, apparently 
for the first time in official language, to "the University of 
Maryland." In fact, the Act was designed to create an insti- 
tution to be known as the "University." 



The considerable confusion now existing with regard to 
this Act, as well as to what transpired in the period immedi- 
ately after its passage — that is, from 1784 to 1791 — suggests 
the desirability of a careful re-examination of all of the evi- 
dence in order to determine the precise relationship, if any, 
between what then happened and the true origin of the mod- 
ern "University of Maryland." 



old main," now Davidge Hall. 



<•>,♦' 




«*• ♦ 



-> "O per Cent. 

91 



^ 



/^1 



r 






^ 



r/f 




N 



4s 



1784. Wafliington College Lottery. 
State of Maryland N ° . =^=^= 

THIS Ticket entitles the Benrcr to fuch Prize as may be 
drawn agaiatt its Number, if demanded in Nine Month* 
after the drawing. is""fKiifi"u - d, Jubipft W* dvJu'Hion ofyfitmn 



presented m Mrs. h illitim S. Collins, of Chestertown. 



N' 



\i the outset, it is important to identi J\ two schools ot 
great antiquity, which it was the purpose o\ the Act of 1784 

to bring together as a single institution, or "University." 
rhese were Washington College at Chestertown on the East- 
ern Shore and St. Johns College at Annapolis on the Western 
Shore. Each had its origin, it should be pointed out. in the 
colonial period, and each had received official recognition 
from the colonial government and a certain degree of public 
tax support, although, in the main, each was supported 
through public subscriptions, tuitions, and lotteries. Likewise, 
each original!) was a school of less than college stature, stress- 
ing basic courses in the arts, sciences, humanities and litera- 
ture, and serving to train young men and boys, such as might 
be admitted, at several levels of education. Distinctly, each 
was an institution devoted to teaching a general curriculum, 
rather than a professional one. 

The Eastern Shore school was known at first as Kent 
School, but. in 17X2. under a State charter it became a "Col- 
lege" and was re-named to honor the distinguished General 
George Washington, who had recently defeated Cornwallis 
at Yorktown. On the other hand. "King William's School" 
at Annapolis, which was founded about the time that the 
colonial capital was moved from St. Mary's City to the banks 
of the Severn, was chartered "St. Johns College*' by the same 
Act of 1784. providing for the creation of a "University." 1 

It was the opinion of the General Assembly, as stated in the 
language of the Act. that "the connection between the two 
Shores will be greatly increased by uniformity of manual and 
joint efforts for the advancement of literature, under one su- 
preme legislative and visitorial jurisdiction." Thus the law- 
makers decreed that, henceforth. Washington and St. Johns 
Colleges "shall be. and they are hereby — to be one Univer- 
sity bv the name of the University of Maryland, whereof the 
governor of the State for the time being shall be the chan- 
cellor, and the principal of one of the colleges shall be vice- 
chancellor." 

During the next half-dozen years after the action of the 
Assembly, each school continued its separate way and under 
its own management: and there was apparently no serious 
effort to realize the unified program suggested by the legisla- 
tive declaration. In November. 1790. however, a meeting of 
representatives of the two schools was held in Annapolis, but 
neither then nor at another "convocation" in May, 1791. was 
an agreement reached concerning the proposed "University"; 
and. after the latter date, the records fail to show anv further 
significant development in the plan to unify. Various explana- 
tions tor this failure have been made. These tend to stress the 
jealous] ol the two Shores toward each other, as well as the 
alleged impracticability of the plan. Whatever the reasons, it 
is clear that the propitious moment had not yet arrived. It is 
equallv clear. tOO, that DO direct relationship exists between 
these earl) steps growing out of the Act of 1784 and the in- 
stitution known todav as the Universit) of Maryland. 



II rHUS APPEARS THAI IHlsl EVENTS FROM 1784 TO 1791 
are more particularly the prologue to our story, rather than 
the real thing: it should be noted, nevertheless, that alreadv a 
chain of circumstances was developing which would, before 
verv long, lead to the origin of the modern University. True, 
these occurrences did not seem likely . as thev began to hap- 
pen, to lead to anv such result since thev were apparently re- 
lated to another and quite different matter. 

In fact, it is in a sequence of more or less obscure happen- 
ings involving the earlv history of medicine in Maryland — 
and certain members of the medical profession in Baltimore — 
that we find the true beginning of our institutional story. Dr. 
Eugene F. Cordell. the great historian of the Medical School 
in Baltimore, has correctly pointed out that the Universit) of 
Maryland "is unique among modern Universities — in being 
founded upon a School of Medicine." This is true, he asserts. 
despite the fact that generally it would be regarded as a serious 
handicap to success to attempt to start the building of an 
institution devoted to all aspects of higher learning from such 
an origin, inasmuch as "the basis of all higher education must 
ever be the department of literature" and the arts, the sci- 
ences, and the humanities, which are the feeders "of the pro- 
fessional schools." Fortunately, these broad and basic fields. 
so necessary to the ultimate success of education in the "pro- 
fessions." were to make their belated appearance in the course 
of time, although it would require more than a centurv to 
establish them securely in the program of the University. In 
truth, it was not until the Consolidation Act of 1920. that 
the Arts and Sciences College was to become a vital part of 
the institutional program. 

In the last ten years of the Eighteenth Centurv and in the 
first ten of the Nineteenth Centurv. there was slowly being 
formed in Baltimore a "Medical and Chirurgical" society, 
which had as its major interest the elimination of many of 
the loose practices and ignorance that so often, in that period, 
characterized the field of medicine. This drive for better 
standards in the profession was occurring none too soon, for 
Baltimore was growing rapidly and alreadv had attained, by 
1810. a population large enough to make it the third city in 
size in the United States. Its medical practitioners now num- 
bered more than two hundred, and counted, among them, 
some of the finest doctors and surgeons to be found in 
America, including even a few trained in famous schools in 
Scotland and Germany. Even so. there were many "quacks' 
preving upon the sick and the helpless: and there was need of 
closer supervision of licensing on a statewide basis, which the 
Baltimore society was attempting to achieve.-' 

The idea of a medical school in Baltimore to give better 
training for prospective doctors and surgeons was not new. 
The famous Dr. Charles Frederick Wiesenthal, who had come 
from Prussia in 1755. had long been conducting classes in the 
rear of his place at Gay and Fayette streets. When he died 
in 1789. his son. Andrew, whom he had trained, and Dr. 



10 



the Maryland Magazim 



George Buchanan continued this work, .it least until An 
drew's death in 1798. Meanwhile, Dr. John Beale Davidge, 
alter he arrived in Baltimore in 17 u (>, began also to lecture in 
"Anatomy, Surgery, Midwifery, and Physiology" and soon 
the "Medical and Chirurgical" group undertook to give active 
assistance to this program. Out of it. in 1807, was to come 
"The College ol Medicine ol Maryland," which, in the ensu- 
ing live sens, would develop into the second school to be 
called officiallv the "University ol Maryland." 



THE BASIC ACT OF THE GENERA1 ASSEMBLY OF DECEMBER, 
1807. establishing the "College of Medicine" deserves 
recognition as the first official action by the State relating to 
the modern "University." It is therefore the basic charter act 
oi our present institution, because the original "College," by 
virtue of the later Act of 1812. creating the University, be- 
came an integral part of the new institution without the spe- 
cific revocation of the Act of 1807. As a matter of fact, the 
new charter of 1812 actually authorized the existing "Col- 
lege of Medicine of Maryland" to "constitute, appoint and 
annex to itself (three other) colleges or faculties, viz: The 
Faculty of Divinity, The Faculty of Law and The Faculty of 
the Arts and Sciences." These "four faculties or colleges, thus 
united," were to be, according to the Act, "constituted an 
University, hy the name and under the title of The University 
of Maryland." 

Even before the passage of this historic measure by the 
Maryland General Assembly in 1812, definite steps had been 
taken to provide a permanent home for the College of Medi- 
cine, at the site where the Baltimore branch of the University 
is still to be found, at the corner of Lombard and Greene 
Streets. The medical group, to solve this problem, had enlisted 
the aid of certain distinguished citizens, among whom were 
Colonel John Eager Howard, famous Revolutionary War 
hero and fifth State Governor of Maryland; Robert Oliver, 
merchant prince and banker, whose commercial empire ex- 
tended over several continents; Robert Gilmor and John and 
David Hoffman. The sum of $11,000 was spent to secure 
"the lot" and the services of R. Cary Long, an eminent archi- 
tect, were secured to produce the design for the first perma- 
nent edifice on the "new campus." The corner stone of this 
building was laid on April 7, 1811, and the construction was 
completed, apparently in 1813, although some classes may 
have been held there in the very year that the second war 
with Great Britain started. :i Funds from lotteries and public 
subscriptions made this program possible. 

"Old Main," as some have come to refer to it, was, from 
the very first, a commanding monument on the landscape. 
Fronting "on the Washington road," and with "an extensive 
prospect down the Patapsco and Chesapeake," the structure 
was developed "on the plan of the (old) Pantheon at Rome." 
Its great dome, as well as its distinctive front portico and eight 
great exterior columns supporting the temple-like roof, was in 
the best classical tradition. 

All in all, it was a grand setting in which to launch the am- 
bitious new University project, and it, without doubt, was a 
considerable factor not only in the enthusiastic reception that 
acclaimed the birth of the School, but in its continuing and 
permanent public support. In the years ahead, moreover, "Old 
Main" was "the centre around which other departments" and 
other buildings would cluster in what was then "the western 



end oi the city." 4 I he trials and tribulations ol the University 
oi Maryland were, ol course, onlj just beginning, Still, in the 

solution ol the complex future problems that must be I. iced. 

there was always the assurance to be derived from 'he endur- 
ing and enlightened steps ahead) taken. 



Mills 

1 For the first "University Act." sec the laws ol Maryland, 
1784. Chapter 37, Sections }3 to 'V I Ik- lull text ol both the V I 
of 1807, and that of 1812. are to he found in Eugene I < onkll. 
University of Maryland, 1807-1907. Its History, Influence, Equip- 
ment and Characteristics With Biographical Sketches ami Portraits 
of its Founders, Benefactors, Regents, Faculty and Alumni, New 
York, and Chicago, 1 907, two volumes. The first chaptet ol 
Volume I is especially helpful with reference to the early story, 
and to these Acts. 

It may be of interest to point out that, in the early part of the 
Twentieth Century, efforts were again directed toward bringing 
St. Johns College (Annapolis) within the State University system, 
but once more, these failed. 

- In addition to Cordell's work, cited above, there is also an 
earlier single volume by this author, entitled Historical Sketch <>f 
the University of Maryland School of Medicine, 1807-1890, Balti- 
more, 1891. A useful discussion of the early history of Baltimore, 
as well as of the early medical movement there is to be found in 
J. Thomas Scharf, History of Baltimore City and County, Phila- 
delphia, 1881. See therein especially pages 729 to 757. 

3 R. Cary Long was born in Maryland in 1772. He rose from 
the status of a skilled carpenter to become one of the great archi- 
tects of the early national period. Also, he was primarily responsi- 
ble for the early introduction in Baltimore of illuminating gas. 
Baltimore's use of gas lighting marks its beginning in the United 
States. Only London, England, at that time had installed such a 
system. Long aided later in bringing gas to both Boston and Phila- 
delphia. Long was responsible for numerous public buildings in 
Baltimore; and he laid out "Canton" suburb. He had a son by the 
same name, who also became an architect of distinction. 

Tradition has it that a large crowd of anxious Baltimoreans 
viewed the spectacular firing on Fort McHenry from the front 
entrance of "Old Main" — the events in other words that led to 
the writing of the Star Spangled Banner in 1814. 

Lotteries were a common means in the early national period 
for financing public enterprises of many kinds. Public opinion 
seems to have turned against their use generally in the period 
from 1850 to 1860, when laws were passed to outlaw them. It is 
significant, in this connection, that the Act of the Maryland Legis- 
lature creating the College Park school in 1856 provided for a 
system of selling "stock" for the raising of funds. Support for 
public education by direct taxation, though occasionally employed, 
was rare in Maryland prior to the Civil War. 

4 The "Divinity School" operated only a short time after the 
creation of the University of Maryland in 1812. The Arts and Sci- 
ences faculty struggled along in indifferent fashion until the period 
between 1827 and 1830, when an effort to revive this phase of the 
program was marked by the annexation of an independently oper- 
ating "Baltimore College." That effort also was doomed to failure. 
Thus only the Medical School and the Law School remained active 
up to the time of the Act of 1882. Meanwhile both the Dental and 
Pharmacy curricula had some development in the period particu- 
larly after 1840, but neither was a separate department of the 
University prior to 1882. See. in this connection, the "Supple- 
mentary Act of 1882," Chapter 88, Laws of Maryland for that 
year, which stressed chiefly the Dental and Pharmacy Schools, as 
separate departments of the University. In this regard it should 
be noted that the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, an insti- 
tution at first loosely associated, but not directly connected with 
the University Medical School, was founded in 1839 — one of the 
oldest dental schools in the United States. 

Meanwhile, of course, the new Maryland Agricultural and Me- 
chanical College had been born at College Park. It had from its 
beginning in 1856 some courses relating to the Arts and Sciences, 
but these had little emphasis for many years. The Act of April 1 I. 
1916, to be found in Chapter 372. Laws of Maryland for that year, 
greatly enlarged the scope and functions of the College Park 
school, preparatory to the consolidation measure of April 9, 1920, 
which, at long last, brought the original University of Maryland 
in Baltimore and the College Park school together in one greatly 
expanded University program. See the Laws of Maryland, 1920. 
Chapter 480. 



January - February , 1960 



11 



The Maryland Blue Crab 

Pasteurization Now Makes This Delightful Delicacy 
from the Chesapeake Available to Gourmets Everywhere 

By Mildred Gerke Wharton 



FROM IIU EARUES1 DAYS OF THE COLONY, III! CHESA- 
peake Baj has provided citizens of Maryland with bounti- 
ful seafood harvests. 

Oysters From the Baj arc known and appreciated through- 
out the United States. Until recently, however. Chesapeake 
crabmeat, a highh perishable product, has been somewhat 
limited in its range of use from the Last (oast. New process- 
ing discoveries have now made possible shipment to the 
Midwest and even the Far West. 

The crabmeat industry began in Maryland late in the Nine- 
teenth Century and. although it has spread to all of the South 
Atlantic and Gulf States. Maryland remains the largest pro- 
ducer of this gastronomic delicacy. The blue crab is found 
abundantly in the Chesapeake Bay and the best season for 
catching is during the summer months. Rules affecting lobster 
traps also apply to crab-pots and watermen observe careful 
methods of ownership. A normal catch for a day would 
approximate several hundred pounds. Crab-processing plants 
buy the crabs in one-hundred-pound barrels. After purchase, 
the crabs are cooked, picked and packed for market. The 
\ ield of crabmeat from one hundred pounds of live crabs is 
about twelve pounds so it isn*t difficult to visualize the per- 
centage of waste and the labor required to produce this deli- 
cacy. The Seafood Processing Laboratory of the University of 
Maryland studied the entire process to determine best methods 
of handling. The Laboratory is located in Crisfield. a small 
fishing village that has been called the "Seafood Capital of 
the World." 

Results from experimental work carried on at the Labora- 
tory have shown that both yield and flavor are improved by 
careful cooking prior to picking the meat. Crabmeat. after it 
is picked, is highly perishable. Large quantities flood the mar- 
ket during the summer months and then later in February or 
March becomes scarce and expensive. However, crabmeat 
can now be pasteurized and still retain its fine fresh flavor. 
When pasteurized, the crabmeat can be kept on ice or under 
refrigeration for six months. Pasteurization of crabmeat is a 



Mis G. \V Wharton, former Universitv dietitian, is the wife of 
Dr. G. W. Wharton, Professor and Head of the Department of 
Zoology. I he Department administers the University's Seafood 
Processing I aboratorj at Crisfield. 

Mrs. Wharton was graduated from Ohio State Universit\ in 193N 
and has served .is a dietitian at the University of Texas, the Uni- 
versity of Colorado, Vanderbilt University and the Universit\ of 
Maryland. 

She is .1 Past-President of Phi Upsilon Omicron Alumnae Associa- 
tion (Washington) and a member of the board of Directors, 
Steward's and Caterer's Association (Washington). 



process that has been known for a number of years but not 
widely practiced until the Seafood Processing Laboratory re- 
studied the process and made its findings available to the 
industry. Much crabmeat is now being pasteurized and is 
available in quantity to all who wish to take advantage of 
Maryland's finest product. 

Three types of meat are picked from the blue crab: lump 
or backfin. white flake or regular, and claw. Back fin and 
regular are removed from the body of the crab and do not 
differ in taste. Claw, as the name implies is picked from the 
claws, is darker in color and has more flavor. The backfin is 
the premium product characterized by the large size of the 
individual morsels of delicate taste. Although the regular meat 
is as delicious as the back fin. the smaller flakes make it less 
suitable for many crabmeat dishes and it commands a lower 
price. Claw meat is at present the least expensive but favored 
by some in the making of crab cakes. 



FOR MANY YEARS BOTH BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON, D. C, 
have been cities of fine restaurants. Many of these res- 
taurants feature crabmeat in a number of delightful prepara- 
tions. Perhaps the most distinguished of recipes for backfin 
is the Crab Imperial. Of many recipes for this dish of dishes, 
the following is a favorite: from Thompson's Seafood Res- 
taurant: 

(5-6 servings) 

1 lb. Backfin crabmeat. Remove shell. 
l 2 clp Mayonnaise; good grade. 

2 T. Capers. 

Blend gently. Place 4 oz. servings in natural crab 
shells or Laroco patented paper crab shells. Sprinkle 
very lightly with paprika. Bake in 425 degree oven 
for 25 minutes. 

Governor Tawes of Maryland has written Bish Thompson 
that he excels all others in making and serving one of the 
finest Crab Imperials he has ever eaten. One of the attractions 
of Crab Imperial is that it blends so well with other seafoods. 
M) husband's favorite seafood used to be Abalone sauted in 
butter. This was before he experienced the sheer gastronomic 
delight of Broiled Lobster stuffed with Imperial Crab at 
Thompson's. Another one of their successful entrees is Baked 
Shrimp stuffed with Imperial Crab. 

From a famous caterer in the Washington area. Mr. Pietro 
Orcino. of Avignone Freres, we have a special recipe for 
crab cakes: 



12 



lhe Maryland Magazim 



( (■> I \K(,1 i RAB i \kl s ) 

I LB. CRABMEAT, SPECIA1 I Kl \id\ I sill I I ). 

I i i r Mid i Kl wi s.ui I 
I 3 i . Si \i OOD Si ZONING. 

I I . CHOPPl d ONIONS 

I I . Chopped parsi i i . 

Svi i i I H.ii i I 1 

Mix gently and form into cakes, dip in beaten egg 
wash, roll in bread crumbs and fry in deep fat. 
A void over-cooking. 

Many other delightful ways of preparing and serving crab- 
meat are known. One luncheon favorite at the Sheraton is 
Avocado stuffed with crab salad. Other items such as (rah 
Norfolk, deviled crab and crab casseroles are easy to prepare 
and are enjoyed by many in this area. 

From a recipe booklet written by Maryland's first lady, 
Mrs. J. Millard Tawes. this favorite recipe on Crab Canapes 
is given: 



8 OZ. < i< \IIMI \ i 

1 I I \s I [ORSl R \disii 

I 2 I 1 \s. PR1 PARI i) MUSI \ki> 

I 2 CUP MAYONN msi 

I 2 I I \s \\ okc l si i RSHIRI s\i < l 

2 I 1 \s. Sill Kin 

Combine all ingredients; dull. Serve <>n toasted 

bread rounds or (rackets. Garnish with grated 
yolk. 

As the techniques of Pasteurization and refrigeration are 
applied to the processing and distribution ol the crabmeat ot 
the Maryland Blue (rah. appreciation of this delicacy will 
advance from Crisfield, to Cincinnati, to Chicago and points 
everywhere. 

After centuries of use as a regional food. Maryland crab- 
meat now seems destined to tempt, tantalize and satis! y the 
national palate. 



Do You Remember? 




THE ABOVE PHOTOGRAPH WAS A RECENT GIFT TO THE MARY- 
land and Rare Books Department in the McKeldin Li- 
brary at College Park. It was given by Mr. James C. Smith, 
of Little Orleans, Maryland, who acquired it along with some 
other items he had purchased in a shop. Having no special 
need for the photograph he felt that the best possible place 
for it would be among the University's archives. 

The photograph is believed to have been taken at the Mary- 
land Agricultural College in 1907 or 1908. Several persons 
who later achieved prominence have been identified. Can you 
spot them? If you can identify any of the persons in this 
photograph, please notify the Maryland and Rare Books 
Department. 

The University is grateful to Mr. Smith for turning up this 
unusual fragment of University history. There are many such 



items residing in dusty attics or being discarded because peo- 
ple do not know that the University is now actively searching 
for and collecting such material for permanent record. The 
Department is seeking many different types of materials: pro- 
grams, yearbooks, photographs, pamphlets, reports, all type 
of publications, copies of speeches, receipts, etc. 

If you have University or State materials which you feel 
should be added to the collection, please notify 

Professor Howard Rovelstad, Director of Libraries 
or Mrs. Harold Hayes, Librarian. Maryi and and Rare 
Books Department 
McKeldin Library 
University of Maryland 
College Park. Maryland 



L 



January - February, 1960 



13 



...unselfish devotion to his fellowman... 

A Testimonial Dinner in Cumberland Honors Retiring 
Member of the Board of Regents, Edmund S. Burke 

Remarks by President Elkins 



Iwi PLEASED in HAV1 mi nmiiK.i 01 hm-kimming 
the UniversitJ ol Maryland at this dinner and particularly 
the Board ol Regents as their Executive Officer. I share with 
man) a personal admiration tor the honored guest. 

It there is an) need to demonstrate the attitude of the 
Hoard and the administration toward Mr. Burke, sufficient 
evidence of a warm feeling should be found in the decision 
of the Board to meet in Cumberland at this time. Our regular 
meeting places, for rather obvious reasons, are in Baltimore 
and College Park; and this is the first time during my adminis- 
tration and. according to the records for the past twenty years. 
onl) the third time a Board meeting has been held awa\ from 
College Park and Baltimore. 

And let me add that we are extremely happy to be in 
Cumberland, thanks to the occasion and, to some extent, the 
persuasiveness ai Judge Walsh. 

The University is a complex organization, and is becoming 
more so each succeeding day. The direction of the University 
is placed in the hands of a governing Board, and its success is 
determined, m a large measure, by the quality of its member- 
ship. The State of Maryland can be justly proud of the men 
and women who have served, and who. over the years, have 
developed a great institution to nourish and support our 
democratic way of life. 

Individual members bring to the Board varied talents and 



interests, but above all the) must bring integnts. \ision. cour- 
age, and a devotion to high public service. 

Mr. Burke dispkned all of these qualities in full measure 
during his nme-\ear term from 1950 to 1959. In addition, he 
made a special contribution as he approached the problems of 
the Board from the point of view ot a businessman and, as I 
well know, demanded a clear, concise presentation of our 
proposals. The University is a hetter place today because of 
his knowledge and leadership. 

I know, too, Mr. Burke that you would be the first to ac- 
knowledge that you have had some help, and perhaps a little 
advice, from your wife, and that she deserves to share this 
recognition of your achievements. 

Speaking for members of the Board of Regents and the 
entire University community. I congratulate those who are 
responsible for this event in appreciation of a man whose dis- 
tinguished career and unselfish devotion to the welfare of his 
fellow man will long remain an inspiration to all of us and 
to all he served. As it has been said of other truly great men, 
"If you would find his monument, look about you." 

You. Mr. Burke and Mrs. Burke. ma\ receive many gifts as 
tokens of appreciation: but the real reward. I trust, will be a 
deep sense of personal satisfaction which comes only to those 
who share the fruits of their talents with others. This you 
have done and may you continue to enjoy God's richest 
blessings. 



Maryland Books and Authors 



Edited bv Mrs. Harold Haves, Head, 



Maryland and Rare Books Department 



Loney. Dr. Glenn. BRIEFING 
AND CONFERENCE TECH- 
NIQUES. New York: McGraw- 
Hill. 1959. 194 p. $5.50. (Mc- 
Graw-Hill Series in Speech). 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND II XS 
joined man) other outstanding uni- 
\ersities in representation in McGraw- 
H ill's speech series. 

Dr. Glenn Loney, a former member 
of the speech staff ol Maryland's Over- 
seas Program, has written a book that 



covers two fields ol speech heretofore 
mentioned only briefly in standard 
works on speech. 

Briefing and Conference Techniques 
in a unique and invaluable text in that 
it presents the main points to be remem- 
bered in using the closel) related skills 
ol public speaking, audio-visual aids, 
briefing and conferencing. It was writ- 
ten specificall) tor the student who 
needs a general outline of these aspects 
ol speech: tor the executive, the group 
leader, the scientist, the military or pro- 




fessional man who wishes to become 
more effective in conference and pres- 
entation techniques. 

'Continued on next pc 



14 



i 1 1 1 Maryland Ma c. a 7 i n e 



Maryland Books 
and Authors 



Dr. Loney has divided his hook into 

tour sections: "Basic Communications," 

Audio-visual Aids for Speakers," 

"Written and Oral Briefing Techniques," 

and "Conference Techniques." 

Each section is clearly outlined for 
the reader, with a summary at the end 
of each section. The author has made 
extensive use of example to illustrate 
his points. Dozens of well-chosen pic- 
tures, graphs, charts and diagrams make 
it easy for the reader to follow the text. 

Dr. Loney's book is the first one to 
treat audio-visual aids as material re- 
lated to the conference situation. He 
considers almost all possibilities of 
sound and sight devices to get and 
hold audience attention, to give the 
speech impact, and to aid in compre- 
hension and retention of the speaker's 
ideas. 

At the end of the book Dr. Loney has 
included an extensive bibliography for 
those who wish more specifics about the 
four sections of the book. 

Dr. Loney joined the overseas staff 
of the University of Maryland in the 
summer of 1956 and began teaching at 
Pepperrell Air Force Base in St. John's, 
Newfoundland. For the past two and a 
half years he has been in Europe and 
has taught in Verdun, Naples, Man- 
chester, Athens, Munich, and Dhahran, 
Saudi Arabia. 

Although "the book was written while 
Dr. Loney was a member of the Euro- 
pean Staff, he is now on the Faculty of 
the Drama Department at Hofstra Col- 
lege, Hempstead, Long Island, N. Y. 
He is presently writing a novel and 
translating a play. An interview with 
Katina Paxinou, the famous Greek ac- 
tress, was recently published in an is- 
sue of Theatre Arts. Dr. Loney is to be 
commended on his industry and his 
outstanding contribution to the field of 
speech. 

— REVIEWED BY GEORGE J. DILLAVOU 
DIRECTOR, ATLANTIC DIVISION 
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 

By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 

1960 Spring Sports 



Future reviews will include Thomas 
Paine: Man of Reason by Dr. Alfred O. 
Aldridge, and The Anatomy of Ameri- 
can Popular Culture. 1840-1861, by Dr. 
Carl Bode. 







BASEBALL 


i 






GOLF 




1 Mar. 


29 


Dartmouth 


Home | 


Mar. 


28 


South Carolina 


A way 1 




31 


Syracuse 


Home 1 




29 


Clemson 


Away 1 


1 Apr. 


2 


Colgate 


Home 1 


Apr. 


2 


Princeton 


Home 1 




5 


Navy 


Away 1 




4 


N. C. State 


Home 1 




7 


N. C. State 


Away | 




9 


Penn St. -Georgetown 


Home 1 




8 


South Carolina 


Away 1 




23 


Va.-Wake Forest 


Home 1 




9 


Clemson 


A way | 




25 


Georgetown 


Home 1 




14 


North Carolina 


Away I 




27 


Navy 


Away 1 




15 


Wake Forest 


Away 


May 


4 


Johns Hopkins 


Away 1 




16 


Duke 


Away | 




6 


North Carolina 


A way | 




18 


Clemson 


Home 




7 


Duke 


A way ! 




19 


South Carolina 


Home | 


13 


-14 


ACC Tournament 






26 


Johns Hopkins 


Away 






Durham 


N. C. 1 




28 


Georgetown 


Home | 


COACH: FRANK CRONIN 






30 

2 


Virginia 
North Carolina 


Away 
Home | 










1 May 












3 


N. C. State 


Home 




OUTDOOR TRACK 






5 

7 

9 

10 

16 


Georgetown 
Penn State 
Duke 

Wake Forest 
Virginia 


Away | 
Away 1 
Home 1 
Home 
Home 


Mar. 26 

Apr. 14 

23 

29-30 

May 3 


Florida Relays Away 1 
Duke Away i 
North Carolina Away 1 
Penn Relays Philadelphia i 
DC A.A.U. Home \ 


| coach: h 


BURTON SHIPLEY 






7 


Navy-Georgetown 


Home 1 










13 
27 


-14 

-28 


ACC Meet 

IC-4A Meet Ne\ 


Home 1 










v York 1 






TENNIS 




COACH: JIM KEHOE 




Mar. 


26 

31 


M.I.T. 
Syracuse 


Home 
Home 




















Apr. 


2 


Georgetown 


Home 






LACROSSE 






4 


Brown 


Home 


Mar. 


19 


Mt. Washington 






5 


Virginia 


Home 






(Exhibition) 


Away | 




9 


Penn State 


Away 




26 


Virginia 


Away 1 




13 


Navy 


Away 


Apr. 


2 


Princeton 


Home 1 




22 


N. C. State 


A way 




8 


New Hampshire 


Home 1 




23 


Duke 


A way 




9 


Washington and Lee 


Home 1 




25 


Wake Forest 


Home 




23 


Syracuse 


Away 1 




28 


Johns Hopkins 


Home 




30 


Navy 


Home 1 


I May 


2 


South Carolina 


A way 


1 May 


7 


Army 


Away 1 




3 


Clemson 


Away 




14 


Duke 


Away 1 




7 


North Carolina 


Home 




18 


Penn State 


Home 1 


I 12-13-14 


ACC Tournament 


N.C. St. 




21 


Johns Hopkins 


Away ■ 


1 COACH: DOYLE ROYAL 




CO-COACHES : JACK FABER AND AL HEAGY 1 



January - February, 1960 



75 



( ampus Notes 

( 'ontinued from /■• 



partment ol Botany, has been named 
recentl) to state and national posts ol 
importance. 

Action taken In Maryland Governor 
i Millard rawea appointed Dr. Barn- 
ford to the Board ol Natural Resources 
foi the remaindei ol a four-year term 
beginning June I, 1958. Governor 
[awes stated: I am confident that your 
judgment and ability in performing the 
duties ol this office will be to the ad- 
vantage ol the State and its people." 

Dean Bamford is also a recently 
elected member of the Board of Direc- 
tors. Oak Ridge Institute oi Nuclear 
Studies. I he election took place at the 
annual meeting ol the Institute's Coun- 
cil — a bod) composed of one repre- 
sentative from each of the 37 southern 
universities which compose the non- 
profit, educational corporation. The 
Hoard o\ Directors manages the or- 
ganization for member universities. 



C. M. White to Receive 
Fairi ess Award 

Another outstanding honor has come 
to Charles M. White, Civil Engineering 
' U>. Chairman of the Board and Chief 
Executive Officer of Republic Steel 
Corp., with the announcement by the 
American Institute of Mining, Metal- 
lurgical, and Petroleum Engineers that 
he has been named for its Benjamin F. 
I airless Award. 

To be presented to Mr. White at the 
Annual Meeting of AIME, in New 
York City, February 14-18. 1960. the 
Award is in recognition of the fact that 
'his ability, energy and determination 
in starting the top-pressure blast fur- 
nace and foresight in providing it with 



ADVERTISE 

IN 
MARYLAND 
MAGAZINE 




Mr. White 



prepared burdens have created the 
world's dominant metal producer." 

The Benjamin F. Fairless Award was 
established in 1954 through a fund pro- 
vided by the U. S. Steel Corp. It recog- 
nizes distinguished achievement in iron 
and steel production and ferrous metal- 
lurgy. It is designed to honor Mr. Fair- 
less for his intense interest in the tech- 
nology and development of the iron 
and steel industry. 

Born in Oakland. Maryland, Mr. 
White was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland as a mechanical en- 
gineer. In 1913, he began his career in 
steel as a machinist helper with the 
American Bridge Company at Am- 
bridge. Pennsylvania. Joining Jones and 
I.aughlin Steel Corp. as a millwright 
helper in a sintering plant he became 
plant superintendent in two years. Ex- 
tensive experience in blast furnace op- 



eration developed with his work as mas- 
ter mechanic in charge of construction. 
maintenance and power. He served, 
also, as general superintendent ol an 
interplant railway. 

In 1927. Mr. While was appointed 
Assistant General Superintendent of the 
J k I. Aliquippa Works. I wo \ears later 
he was made General Superintendent. 
In 1930. Mr. White joined the newly or- 
ganized Republic Steel Corp. as \ 
sistant Vice President. Operations. He 
became operating Vice President in 
1935. President in 1945 and Chairman 
in 1956. 



Fullerton Addresses Journalism 

( i ROUP 

Max Fullerton. Associated Press Bureau 
Chief for Maryland and West Virginia, 
recently made an address to the faculty 
and students of the Department of Jour- 
nalism and Public Relations. The an- 
nual program commemorated National 
Newspaper Week. 

Speaking on the subject of the role of 
journalism departments in preparing fu- 
ture journalists, Mr. Fullerton told his 
audience that teaching future newsmen 
the tools of their trade is only part of 
the job which must be done by the na- 
tion's newsmen. 

He said that tomorrow's journalists 
should also be equipped with the 
broadest possible outlook." 

One of the nation's most well-known 
and respected journalists. Mr. Fullerton 
celebrated his 30th anni\ersar\ with the 
Associated Press in November. He 
presented with a cake by Sigma Delta 
Chi in honor of the occasion. 



Journalist Fullerton addresses Maryland students 




16 



thf Maryland Magazim 



llosi'i i m Institutes Nbw Prookam 

\ new development program for supei 
visory employees at University Hospital 
began earlj in November. 

["he program, which was a scar in 
planning, is the result of .1 comprehen- 
sive survej ol the organization's need. 
Us purpose is to re-emphasize the vari- 
ous facets ol the management function 
m the administration of the hospital 
and to develop all supervisor) person 
Del to optimum proficiency. 

I he program is one of the responsi- 
bilities oi Edward H. Noroian, who has 
previously hail administrative responsi- 
bility for similar programs in other hos- 
pitals. Mr. Noroian states that only by 
continually developing supervisor) ca- 
pabilities can hospitals hope to meet 
problems resulting from increased de- 
mand lor services without the concomi- 
tant increase in work force. 

Top level administrative officers on 
the University's Baltimore campus, in- 
cluding the Director of University Hos- 
pital, tested the program by participa- 
tion and aided in its final formulation. 





Dr. Nerboso 

Dr. Nerboso Named Assistant 
Director 

Dr. Salvatore D. Nerboso, formerly 
librarian and research assistant of the 
New York Times' Washington Bureau, 
was recently appointed Assistant Direc- 
tor of Libraries in charge of readers' 
services. Dr. Nerboso was graduated 
with a B.A. degree from the University 
of New Hampshire in 1941, and an 
MA. degree from George Washington 
University in 1944. In addition, he 

January - February, 1960 



holds both MA. and Ph.D. degrees 111 
political science from Harvard I'imci 
sit\ He was awarded a B.S. degree in 
librar) science by Columbia Uimersih 
m 1947. 

I)i Nerboso has authored numerous 
articles loi IiIm.ha science a\k\ political 

science periodicals. 



College of 

AGRICULTURi: 



A. B. Hamilton 



Down Under 

Russell Ci. Dent. '56. is an entomologist 
lor the Department of Agriculture for 
South Australia and is located at 1 
Greenways, King William Rd., North 
Adelaid, Australia. Dent would like to 
contact other Marvlanders in the area. 



Dairy Judges 

Maryland 4-H Dairy Judging Team is 
tops in the nation for the 14th time. The 
team won over teams from 33 States 
competing in the National Dairy Cattle 
Judging Contest at Waterloo, Iowa. 

The team won by a wide margine by 
scoring a total of 2,062 points. By win- 
ning the national contest they are now 
eligible to receive an invitation to the 
International Dairy Cattle Judging Con- 
test in London, England. The interna- 
tional show will be held in 1960. 

Members of the team were John L. 
King. Jr., Gaithersburg, Montgomery 
County; Marlin K. Hoff, New Windsor, 
Carroll County; Mary Ellen Grove, Ha- 
gerstown, Washington County; and Jane 
W. Neilson, New Windsor, Frederick 
County. Hoff had the high individual 
score of the contest with 703 points and 
Miss Neilson was a close second with 
699. To win the contest the Maryland 
team placed first in three of the four 
classes and second in the other class. 
Coaches for the team were John Mor- 
ris and Miss Dorothy Emerson of the 
University of Maryland Extension Serv- 
ice. 



Produce Company 

Charles A. Hatfield, Jr., '54, is with 
Libby, McNeill and Libby, vegetable 
processors at Milford, Delaware, 



I \',\ 1 1 

William Bill' 1 bersole '58, is in High) 
training at the Marine base at Pensa 
cola, I loi ida I le expects to got his 

wings in the ne. 11 future, but it is 111 
mored he will "walk down the aisle 

before his trip into the blue yonder. 



I \i>n s Go Wi si 
Maryland Homemakers were represent 

ed b\ 37 members at the National 
Home Demonstration ( ouncil ( onven- 
tion at Portland, Oregon. 

I ra\ehng In chartered bus, the ladies 
had a cross-country tour of America's 
agriculture and resources; a honiemake. 
expressed it this way. "I have traveled 
a lot, but this was the best trip I have 
ever taken." 



Hannan Marketing Speciaiisi 

James L. Hannan, '58, has been named 
by Pennsylvania State University as the 
extension marketing agent for the Phila- 
delphia area. Dr. H. R. Albrecht, exten- 
sion director, said Hannan will be sta- 
tioned in Norristown with an office in 
the courthouse. 

Hannan prepared for college at Glen 
Burnie High School and at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland he majored in Agri- 
cultural Economics. He received a mas- 
ter of science degree in marketing from 
Cornell University in 1959. At Mary- 
land he held offices in Alpha Gamma 
Rho, Alpha Zeta and the Agricultural 
Economics Club. 



Agricuiturai Museum 

Lest you forget, the agricultural mu- 
seum continues to grow. Several years 
ago a group of University alumni start- 
ed collecting antique farm tools and 
placed them on display in Shriver Hall, 
the home of Agricultural Engineering. 

Many of the items received were in 
need of repair and this is being done. 
Mr. James King is on a part-time basis 
to make the repairs. Many will remem- 
ber Mr. King as the master carpenter 
at the University who could fix any- 
thing. When he retired from full duty 
it was agreed he could help us. Mr. 
King loves his new assignment. If you 



(Continued on next page) 



17 



L 



PRINTING 




LITHOGRAPHING 



Special Audiotape Offer 



// 



// 



HIGH SPIRITS 



Bonus package includes one 7-in. 
(1200 ft.) reel take and one 7-in. 
recorded reel of sparkling classics 
titled "High Spirits" both for 
only $5.20 

Specify dual or 4 track 

WHOLESALE RADIO PARTS CO., Inc. 

311 W. Baltimore St. 
Baltimore 1. Md. 
Tel. Ml .V213 1 



have mimic old farm tools or equipment 
Contact dm Gienger, .it the Agricul- 
tural Engineering Department. Also 
stop m and see what Mr. King has done. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Stall oi the C olleee 



Prom i hi Depari meni oi 

Mk ROBIOI ika 

Dr. Michael J. Pelc/ar. Jr.. Professor of 
Microbiology, participated in a one-day 

conference on "Biology Teaching in the 
Washington Area." held at Howard Uni- 
versity on December 5th. Agenda tor 
the conference consisted of ( 1 ) local 
problems in the teaching of secondar\ 
school biolog\ owing to the need for 
college preparation: (2) local problems 
in the teaching of college biology owing 
to secondary school preparation: and 
1 3 ) suggestions for improvement of 
secondar\ school and college relations 
in biology in the Washington area. The 
conference was made possible through 
a grant, from the National Science 
Foundation to the Washington Acad- 
emy of Sciences, administered by the 



Joint Board on Sciences Education for 
the Greater Washington Area. 

Raymond N. Doetsch, Associate Pro- 
fessor ol Microbiology, and Philip J. 
PTOVOSt, Graduate Assistant, presented 
.i paper entitled "Biological Characteris- 
tics of Peptostreptococcus sp." at a re- 
cent meeting ol the Washington Branch 
ol the Society ol American Bacteriolo- 
gists, held at the Walter Reed Arm> 
Institute of Research. 

Dr. Pelczar has been appointed as 
President Elkins* representative for the 
University ol Maryland on the Council 
ol the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear 
Studies. Oak Ridge. Tennessee 



Fine Aris Departmeni \t\ss 

The well-known American artist. Mitch- 
ell Jamieson. who recently joined the 
staff of the Department of Art. had a 
one-man show oi his paintings at the 
Student Union during October. Mr. 
Jamiesons work is represented in a 
number of public buildings, including 
murals for U. S. Post Offices in Upper 
Marlboro and Uaurel. Maryland: W'il- 
lard. Ohio: the Marian Anderson Mural 
in the United States Department of 
Interior: and one in the General Ac- 
counting Office Building. Washington. 
D. C. He received a First Prize in 
Fepsi-Cola's Fifth Annual Art Com- 



Cloverlaud 
Jarnts 

Dairy 

¥ 

Quality 
Products 
Matched 

by 

Quality 
Service 




CLOVERLAND --THE DAIRY WITH COWS (Calves, too) 

► Visit Cloverland's Golden Guernsey Farm — Dulaney Valley A 
Road — 8 miles north of Towson. Milking starts at 4 P.M. ^ 



18 



T H E M ARM A N D M A G A Z I N E 



petition, 1948; Guggenheim Founda- 
tion Vwards in l l M7 and 1948; and .1 
grant from the American Academj oi 

\its and I otters. During World War II 
he served as a combat artist with the 
Navy. In addition to many private col- 
lections, paintings and drawings by Mr. 
Jamieson are in the Whitnej Museum 
oi \rt. Brooklyn Museum. Metropolitan 
Museum o\ Art. Cornell University, 
Phillips Memorial Gallery, The Cor- 
coran Gallery of Art, Walker Art t en- 
ter. Wichita Art Museum. Fort Worth 
Art (enter. The University of Nebraska. 
Portland Art Museum. University of 
Washington. Seattle Art Museum, and 
the Norton (.alien of Art. His work 
has been reproduced in a number of 
publications. 

"Old Man.' - a painting by Herman 
Maril of the Art Department faculty, 
was one of the works of art in the Dr. 
Mason F. Lord Collection given re- 
cently to Johns Hopkins University 

On November 25th the Art Depart- 
ment presented a program which fea- 
tured Eliot O'Hara. one of America's 
best known watercolorists. Mr. O'Hara 
gave a demonstration of watercolor 
techniques. In addition, several recent 
films made by the artist were shown. 

"Indigo," a painting by a former Art 
Department student. Merry Ellen Fos- 
ter, was among the winners in a show 
sponsored by the Montgomery County 
Art Association. It was on exhibit in 
the McKeldin Library during the month 
of October. 



BlBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE RESEARCH 

Professor Alfred Bingham, as a result of 
research in Paris carried on during his 
sabbatical leave, 1957-58, has prepared 
a series of articles for learned journals, 
two of which have already been pub- 
lished abroad: "Voltaire and the En- 
cyclopedic Methodique," in Studies on 
Voltaire and the J 8th Century; and "The 
Abbe Bergier: An 18th Century French 
Catholic Apologist," in Modern Lan- 
guage Review, Oxford, England. 



Ol d French 

Professor Eleanor Webster Bulatkin 
published an article in the December 
issue of the Publications of the Modern 
Language Association. "The Arithmetic 
Structure of the Old-French Poem La 
Vie de Saint Alecis." 

(Continued on next page) 

January -February, 1960 



Be Really 
Me freshed I 

Have A 

K^oke 






Silver Spring Coca Cola Bottling Co. 


J 


ohnston, Lemon & Co. 




MEMBER PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 




INVESTMENT SECURITIES 




SOUTHERN BUILDING 115 N. ST. ASAPH 




Washington 5, D. C. Alexandria, Va. 




STerling 3-3130 King 8-6600 



PLUMBING • HEATING • REMODELING • APPLIANCES 

Rheem Heating and Cooling Equipment 

DEXTER E. BRYAN, Inc. 

2300 Rhode Island Ave., N.E. Washington 18, D. C. 

10 Minutes from College Park 

FREE ESTIMATES HObart 2-7800 

3402 Weller Rd„ Wheaton, Md. Whitehall 6-3400 



COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, INC. 

AP 7-8200 
SEVEN CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 

John M. Conroy, President 



TH0MSS0N STEEL CO., Inc. 

5106 Baltimore Avenue 
HYATTSVILLE, MD. AP 7-3201 



19 



m DR1DG1 \ isil s \ \\ \ 

During the iirst semester Professor Al- 
fred Owen Mdridge ol the English IK 
partmenl w.is twice invited to Y.ile Uni- 
versity to participate in ceremonies hon- 
oring authors about whom he has writ- 
ten On October 27 he attended the 
opening .it the Vale I ibrary ol an ex- 
hibit ol rare books and manuscripts ot 
["nomas Paine At the same time the 



Yale ( ooperative Book Store featured a 
displaj ol Professor Aldridge's biogra- 
phy ol Fame ( Han of Reason, Lippin- 
cott, 1959) On November 23 Professor 
\ldridge attended ceremonies commem- 
orating the publication ol Volume One 
ot a neu edition ol the '* ritings of Ben- 
jamin Franklin. I his edition, sponsored 
jointly bj yale l Diversity and the 
American Philosophical Society .it a 

cost ol a quarter ol a million dollars. 



represents one ol the major editorial 
projects ol the century. Professor Al- 
dridge's work on Franklin is mentioned 
several times in Volume One and there 
are also references to two scholars who 
wrote Ph.D. theses at Maryland: Dr. 
Robert Ncwcomb, Assistant Prolessor 
>>t I nglish at Pall State ( ollege, and Dr. 
Jack ( . Panics. Assistant Professor ol 
I uglish at the University ol Maryland. 




They're prepared- 
how about you? 

They're learning to do the things that will make them well-rounded 
and useful citizens. In the meantime, they're depending on you . 
Now is the time to safeguard the future of your youngsters, and 
the rest of your family as well. We will be pleased to discuss with 
you and your attorney the many advantages of creating a First 
National Trust Fund either during your lifetime or by your will. 

FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK of Baltimore 

Main Office: Light & Redwood • Offices throughout Baltimore area • Member FDIC 



Pun osoPHi r Honored 

Professor Lucius Garvin, Head ot the 
Department ot Philosophy, returned to 
the campus this tall alter a sear's 
ol absence, in the course ot which he 
occupied two important lectureships in 
philosophy. His Tully ("Icon knoles 
I ectures in Philosophy, delivered at the 
( ollege ol the Pacific, have been pub- 
lished under the title. The Free Man 
in a Free Society." At Macalester Col- 
lege and Hamline University he ser\ed 
as \isiting professor lor one semester, 
lecturing on "Great Issues" of our times. 



On German Expressionism 

Prolessor C ristoph Hermg has reviewed 
Walter H. Sokel's I he Winter in Ex- 
tremis. The review appeared in the De- 
cember issue of the University ot Wis- 
consin's Monotshefte. 



0\ i hi Maryland Germans 

Professor A. E. Zucker, He.:d of the 
Department of Foreign Langu 
written on "Adolph Steinman. Balti- 
more Musician" lor the recent 195 ( > is- 
sue of the Reports of the Society for 
The History of The Germans in Mary 
land. 

ks i or i hi Library 

Mrs. Marie Pobor\kine has been assist- 
ing the Department's I ibrar\ Repre- 
sentative, Dr. Qu\nn. by expanding the 
Russian collection in the Library. One 
of her former students. Donald Hitch- 
cock, a recent Ph.D. from Harvard who 
has just been appointed to the Univer- 
sity ot Washington, considers that 'we 
have a good start toward building up a 
graduate school librar\ in Russian 
studies." 

The Municipal Library ol Leningrad 
has just invited the University ot Man- 
land I ibrary to join in an exchange 
program ol books. Our Librarian. Mr. 



20 



1111 M \ R >, I \\n \ I \ ( . \ / I \ I 



Howard Rovelstad, called upon \hv 
Boborykine to translate the correspond- 
ence involved. She hersell was born in 
Leningrad, where her father was an 
educational official. 

More students than over arc taking 
Russian courses m the Department. \n- 
other ol Mis. Boborykine's former stu- 
dents, Nick Lee, who is working lor Ins 
doctorate, is assisting her in the Depart- 
ment. 



Honor So< 11 rv 

Delta chapter of the National Spanish 
Honor Society, Sigma Delta Pi, was re- 
activated on the Maryland campus last 
spring. The chapter celebrated its awak- 
ening with the initiation of student and 
honorary members. Dr. James O. Swain 
of the University of Tennessee and 1 \- 
ecutive Secretary of the national ollice 
was present. The initiation ceremony 
took place in the Terrapin Room of the 
dining hall and was followed by a dinner 
in the President's dining room. The 
Honorable Francisco Aguilera. Special- 
ist in Hispanic Culture of the Hispanic 
Foundation of the Library of Congress, 
was initiated as an honorary member. 
He spoke on Spanish-American poetry. 
The second guest of honor was Profes- 
sor George McSpadden. Chairman of 
the Department of Romance Languages 
at George Washington University, the 
only other university in the Metropoli- 
tan area which has a chapter of the 
Socien . 



On Nobel Prize Winner Jimenez 

Professor Graciela P. Nemes spoke on 
Juan Ramon Jimenez at a memorial 
meeting November 12, 1959, on the late 
Nobel Prize Winner. The poet once 
taught Spanish at the University of 
Maryland, where Mrs. Nemes was one 
of his students. At the meeting, held in 
the Department of the Interior Audi- 
torium under the auspices of the Insti- 
tute of Contemporary Arts, the other 
speakers were Eugenio Florit, Jimenez's 
critic, and H. R. Hays, his translator. 
Mrs. Nemes is the biographer of Jime- 
nez. 

Dr. Nemes did research last summer 
on the papers of Jimenez's wife, the late 
Zenobia Jimenez. These are collected 
in the Jimenez Room of the University 
of Puerto Rico. 

Professor Nemes was elected in the 
fall of 1959, as Vice-President of the 

(Continued on next page) 



FOR ALL YOUR HOMECOMINGS 
tiii ^11)^-1)1 PLOMAT 



^ym\\^ 



WASHINGTON'S LARGEST 
AND NEWEST MOTOR HOTEL 



Just 10 minutes from the campus at the intersection of 
Bladensburg Road and New York Ave., N.E. 
TV and Bath in every Room . . . Restaurant and Lounge . . . 
Completely Air Conditioned and Heated . . . Swimming 
Pool . . . Individual Parking . . . Valet Service 

Call LAwrence 6-1400 or write Dept. M, Diplomat Motor Hotel, 
Bladensburg Road and New York Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 







Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

8135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md. 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGN 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



HUFFER SHINN 
Optical 
Company, Inc. 

Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET, N.W. 

NAtional 8-1457 Washington, D. C. 



January - February, 1960 



21 




Douglas diversification affords 
broadened opportunities, com- 
bined with stability and se- 
curity. 

Engineering at Douglas is 
divided into three basic areas 
. . . missile and space systems, 
transport aircraft and combat 
aircraft. In these military and 
commercial categories, each 
advancing beyond present fron- 
tiers of achievement, engineers 
and scientists can progress to 
the limit of their capabilities. 

In addition, supervisory and 
executive openings are filled 
from within the company. 
Many of the top executive 
officers at Douglas are engi- 
neers who have moved right up 
to assume wide responsibility. 

We are interested in engi- 
neers with backgrounds in 
other fields as well as avionics, 
aircraft and missiles. 

For further information write 
to Mr. C. C. LaVene, Douglas 
Aircraft Company, Inc., Santa 
Monica, California. j 

V Section. / 

/ 




the most respected name in aircraft, 
missile and space technology 



local chapter oi the American Associa- 
tion oi reachers «. > f Spanish and Portu- 
guese. Rhonda Piste, a former student 
in the Department, is the new treasurer. 



Di' H. Bryci Jordan— "Am ind 

MUSK " 

Dr. H. Bryce Jordan. Associate Profes- 
sor of Music, has been selected as a 
member of the faculty for the I960 
Salzburg Seminar in American Studies 
at Schloss I.eopoldskron. Salzburg. 
Austria. 

Sponsored by Americans through pri- 
vate contributions, the seminar "pre- 
sents to leaders of Western European 
thought, a unique opportunity to learn 
about America from Americans of aca- 
demic and professional distinction." 
During the past 12 years, more than 
3,000 Europeans have attended 58 ses- 
sions in American studies. 

Over 300 Americans have served as 
faculty. They receive no salary, only 
transportation, room and board. Among 
the 1959 seminar faculty were Herbert 
Brucker. editor of the Hartford Courant; 
Daniel Bell, Columbia University Pro- 
fessor of Sociology; Ralph F. Fuchs, 
Indiana University Professor of Law; 
James B. Conant, former President of 
Harvard University, and John S. 
Dickey. President of Dartmouth Col- 
lege. 

The 67th session, in which Dr. Jor- 
dan will participate, between March 18 
and April 15, will be on the subject of 
"Art and Music in America." Dr. Jor- 
dan will deliver 12 lectures on "Music 
in Contemporary America" which will 
include a consideration of all aspects of 
present-day American musical life. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Brief Items About Ai.umni 

James Colvert Robertson. '57. was 
awarded the Bachelor of Laws degree 
at the fall convocation of the George 
Washington University. 

Leon E. Rice. '59. was graduated re- 
cently from the Navy's Officer Candi- 
date School in Newport. Rhode Island. 




I'' im mhi r Your 

Valentine with Flowers 

We Deliver 

LeROY RUBOTTOM 

6921 Laurel Ave. Takoma Park, Md. 



G.B.MACKEC0RP. 

Serving Maryland University 
with all types of 
Vending Machines 



J. 1. 

WELLS 

CO., INC. 

CREOSOTED 

PRODUCTS 

— Telephones — 

PI 2-2144— PI 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 





Sal 


sbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

SalishH fit's Best 




Bro 


iler - Laying - Hog 
FEEDS 


c 


orn G 


aods - Eshelman Feeds 






Salisbury, Md. 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

Dependable Sir.,, Sine* 1893 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

Mkmiiki! Fkiieuai. Dkpusit Ins. Corp. 



The C0HN & BOCK CO. 

Lumber • Building Material 

poultry FEEDS livestock 

PRINCESS ANNE, MARYLAND 



L. 



22 



the iMaryi. and Magazine 



1 nsign Rice n.is received orders to Jack 
son> ille, Florida. 

I otiis V Ro\ . '59, now .in \im\ l'i i 

vate, recentl) completed the eight-week 
finance procedures course .it the finance 
school, ton Benjamin Harrison, Indi- 
ana. He was (rained m matters relating 

to the acquiring, disbursing and ac- 
counting of funds. 

Jack M. Bowman. MBA. '4 l ). was 
part of the picture when two divisions 
of the Operations and Engineering De- 
partment of the Air Transport Associa- 
tion were combined under a single head. 
Mr. Bowman will now ser\e as the As- 
sistant Director — Operations. 

Harry S. Davis. '48, has enrolled as 
a member of the 1 1 >M) class of the 
American Institute for Foreign Trade, 
Phoenix. Arizona. Mr. Davis is spe- 
cializing in Latin American trade. His 
wife, the former Barbara Riecks. Nurs- 
ing *52. will have an opportunity to 
learn the language and the customs of 
the country in which her husband plans 
to work. 

John H. Showalter, '57, has been ap- 
pointed Supervisor of Machine Ac- 
counting by the Sealtest Foods of the 
National Dairy Products Corporation. 

Michael Battaglini, '54, has been ap- 
pointed as cargo sales representative for 
Pan American World Airways in Chi- 
cago. 



Study of Regulatory Commissions 
Recommended 

One of a series of seminars in public 
affairs held each year by the Govern- 
ment and Politics and Bureau of Gov- 
ernmental Research, an address titled 
"National Regulatory Commissions: 
Need for a New Look" has been pub- 
lished in the Bureau's series, Studies in 
Government. The seminar study is au- 
thored by Emmette S. Redford, Uni- 
versity of Texas Professor of Govern- 
ment. 

In his address, Dr. Redford stated 
that "there is a need for a new look at 
the (regulatory) commission system to 
discover ways of drastically simplifying 
procedure and to concentrate on policy 
development." 

Dr. Redford suggested: "Such a look 
might be provided by a single high com- 
mission representing the Congress and 
the President, or it might be provided 
by a series of investigations by con- 
gressional committees, the separate com- 
missions, organization specialists in the 
executive office, and independent 
scholars." 

(Continued on next page) 



does the 

LION'S 
SHARE 

of House- 
Work! 








Everything in 
Baltimore revolves 
around the 



EMERSON HOTEL 

WILLIAM E. STUBBS, JR. 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECT FACTORY 
AGENTS FOR 

M. G. 

AUSTIN 

HEALEY 

MAGNETTE 

MORRIS 

HILLMAN 

SUNBEAM 

RAPIER 

ROLLS ROYCE 

TRIUMPH 

SPRITE 

JAGUAR 

ALFA-ROMEO 

PORSCHE 



SALES A 



RVICE 




1001 CATHEDRAL ST. BALTIMORE, MD. 

LExington 9-1559 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 



Phone MUlberry 5-6070 



Baltimore 23, Md. 



January - February, 1960 



23 





■}^W 






*** 

1 





New Dimensions 

in 

Engineering 

Careers 

at 

Westinghouse 

Engineers with the vision to 
pioneer tomorrow's new dimen- 
sions will find unprecedented 
career opportunities at West- 
inghouse-Baltimore. Here, 
technological breakthroughs in 
Molectronics, Missile Guid- 
ance, Computer Development, 
Communications, Electronic 
Counter-Measures and Space 
Age Electronics are adding new 
dimensions to engineering 
careers. 



FOR DETAILS write to Mr. A. 
M. Johnston, Dept. 937, Westing- 
house Electric Corporation, P.O. 
Box 746, Baltimore 3, Maryland. 



Westinghouse 

BALTIMORE 



AN ENGINEER'S COMPANY 



Proi i sac* kkimi i ro Hi uj 

N \l IONA1 ( "i N< II 

I he Director ol Maryland's major study 
sequence in public relations, Dr. Harold 
w Krimel, recently accepted the chair- 
manship ot the national (ouncil on 
Public Relations Education. Announce- 
ment i)t the acceptance was made b) 
l)i I red S Siebert ol Michigan Slate 
I niversity, President ol the Association 
lor Education in Journalism. 

The (ouncil is an appointive five- 
member group which represents public 

relations education in matters concern- 
ing research, grants, fellowship auard 
programs, and convention programs. 



Dean P^ i i ( h urs Regionai 

COMMITTEE 

Dr. J. Freeman Pyle, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Business and Public Administra- 
tion, has been appointed chairman of 
the committee on regional conferences 
of the American Association of Col- 
legiate Schools of Business by the Presi- 
dent of the Association. Dean Ross M. 
Trump, School of Business and Public 
Administration. Washington University, 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

The United States is divided into vari- 
ous regions comprising the member 
schools of the Association. Each region 
is represented on the committee for re- 
gional conferences by a dean from its 
section. The conference in each region 
is sponsored by the members of the As- 
sociation; however, each conference is 
open to non-member schools of business 
as well as member schools. One of the 
objectives of the American Association 
of Collegiate Schools of Business is to 
encourage and assist non-member 
schools to meet the standards of mem- 
bership in the American Association. 

Other members of the committee for 
the present year are Dean Karl A. Hill, 
Dartmouth College: Dean Arthur Wa- 
rner. Indiana University; Dean Paul 
Ciarner, University of Alabama; Dean 
Neil Jacoby, University oi California. 
I os Angeles; Dean Eugene Clark, State 
College o\ \\ ashington; and Dean James 
Surface. University ol Kansas. 



S( HOI \Ksnir Aw \R\t\ I) 1 > \ u,n 

Peter M. Lynagh, a senior, has been 
awarded the Pilot Freight Carriers, Inc.. 
Scholarship for the 1959-60 school year. 



— - ,*N 




1 \ 






• j 






v y 




So Good in GLASS! 


Milk and other beverages foi 


YOUR family taste better — fresh 


and wholesome — when served in 


GLASS BOTTLES 


You can SEE the Quality and 


Quantity you are receiving- 


INSIST ON GLASS BOTTLES 


No Loss or Contamination of 


Flavor 


LEAKPROOF — SPARKLING 


TRANSPARENT 


1 III: KICK GLASS 


COMPANY 


FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 


Baltimore 30, Md. 


Originators of the Squa 


Milk Boltl* 





Look for the Sign 




Serving Baltimore's Finest 

Italia)) < 

Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

300 Albermarle St. MU 5-2811 

Baltimore 2. Md. MU 5-2812 



24 



i ii i M \ry i \\D Magazine 



This $500.00 scholarship is awarded 
annuall) to a senior in the College ol 
Business and Public Administration who 
is majoring in transportation and is in- 
terested in the field ol motor transpor- 
tation. 



^CCOUNl INC Aw UUJ C rOl S TO 
E. H. BAY! iss 

F.verett H. Bayliss, of North Beach, 
Maryland, has been selected to receive 
the Certified Public Accountants, Inc., 
1959-60 scholarship award by the ac- 
counting (acuity of the College ol Busi- 
ness and Public Administration. 

A senior in the Department of Ac- 
counting. Ba\liss is a 1954 graduate of 
1 astern High School in Anne Arundel 
County. 

He is President of Beta Alpha Psi, an 
honorary accounting fraternity, and 
chairman of the efficiency committee of 
the Society for the Advancement of 
Management. 



Bethescla's 

newest 
MOTOR HOTEL 



Ymi ran recommend The Betheidan 
with the ntmoil confidence. This 
Incomparable Motor Hotel is luxu- 
rioiul) appointed with Individual 
nir conditioning* wall-to-wall car- 
petini mid private bath ill every 
unit. i.aii:r swimming pool. 



7740 

Wisconsin Ave. 

Bethesda 14, Md. 

OLiver 6-2100 

Briggs and Day, Owners 

^thssdan 




School of 

DENTISTRY 

Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S. 

New Jersey Alumni Section Meets 

The annual meeting and scientific pro- 
gram of the New Jersey Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, was held at the 
Robert Treat Hotel, Newark, New Jer- 
sey, on Wednesday afternoon and eve- 
ning, November 4. 1959. There were 
71 present. 

The scientific program began with a 
welcome and address by program 
chairman. Dr. Nicholas Giuditta after 
which, Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio spoke 
on "Complications of Oral Surgery in 
Dental Practice." "Extraction in the 
Field of Orthodontics" was the title of 
the presentation given by Dr. George 
M. Anderson. These talks were thor- 
oughly enjoyed by all. 

A cocktail hour from 5:30 to 6:30 
p.m. commenced the evening ceremo- 
nies. The Invocation at dinner was 
given by Reverend Eugene B. Kelly of 
Somerville. N. J., and special guests 
were introduced by Dr. Giuditta. Dr. 
Charles Roberts, 1900, New Jersey's 
oldest member and Dr. James F. Doo- 
ley, '59, one of the youngest members 
were presented. 

(Continued on page 29) 



Senior Management Advisors 

(Twenty-Five Retired Executives) 

Specialists in all fields of business and the professions . . . 
with long years of successful accomplishment . . . This 
experience now available to assist with your problems . . . 
Write or call regarding this unique and valuable service. 



A Division Of 

THE INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION 

Counselors in finance and Management 



301 N. Charles Sf. 
Baltimore 



SAratoga 7-3100 
Maryland 



ELIZABETH COONEY 

PERSONNEL AGENCY 

Town & Country Service 

Practical Nurses, Maternity and Convalescent Care 
Baby Sitters & Companions, Day and Evening Appointments 
Supervisors, Week-ends and Vacations 
1511 PENTRIDGE ROAD HO 78435 

BALTIMORE. MD. TU 9-4772 




F. A. Davis & Sons 


WHOLESALERS 


Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 


Kitchen & Dining Equipment 


Soda Fountain Supplies 


119 S. HOWARD STREET 


Baltimore 1, Md. 

"> 



r 



ACME 
TILE COMPANY 

Terrazzo 
Tile — Marble — Slate 

A. F. Pizza 

PL 2-3554 908 Trinity St. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



January - February, 1960 



25 



J — 




1217- 22nd STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 




Une Shade Shop 

and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Street, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FEderol 7-1200 

Manufacturers and Distributors 

•ff Window Shades 

if Venetian Blinds 

if Folding Doors 

if Draperies and Rods 

if Screens 

■jf Inside Shutters 

if Porch Shades 

if Vertical Blinds 

if Decorative Wood Coverings 



H\ S\i i 'i I.umn ()(,di s 

Baltimore, with its many industries, is 
still thought ol as a sleepy southern city 
by those who make an occasional \isit 
to our thriving metropolis. Yet. Balti- 
more's population in the metropolitan 
area is 1,337,000 and it holds the posi- 
tion of heing the sixth largest city in 
the United States. 

The Baltimore Harbor is one ol the 
busiest on the Eastern seaboard and, in 
addition to shipping, Baltimore claims 
one of the nations largest shipbuilding 
operations. 

Baltimore heralds such names as 
Bethlehem Steel, for its shipbuilding 
and ship repair: The Martin Company 
for its manufacture of missiles, elec- 
tronic and nuclear projects; Crosse and 
Blackwell, national food manufacturers; 



Vdlaqe, Shop, 

PRINCE GEORSO PINE5T MEN'5 WEAR JTORE 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 

Dobbs Hats - Bostonian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

UNion 4-1312 



(tf\ 



Competent experienced surgical fitters in attendance 

I^H^^^^M ' quipiiieiil and Supplies for the 

HOSPITAL PHYSICIAN 

~\TT\ TT <Trr1 LABORATOm SURGKON 




IM)| snn 



NURSE 



a *.v Bauuoaktnik 






Sen iitfi the medical profession 
for over <i third of n century 



Q//„, 



aumgariner 



rail 

SI III; 14 A I. nVSTBVMBNT I «».. IX. 
1421 MARYLAND \\ I M l . BALTIMORE l.MD. 

SARATOGA 7-7333 



Qo*. 



MgAuIgmoL 






J H. Filbert, Inc., nationally known 
margarine and mayonnaise manufactur- 
ers: Manuels-Herold Company, manu- 
facturers of King Syrup and King house- 
hold cleaners. Westinghouse-Baltimore. 
where technological breakthroughs in 
Molectronics. Missile Guidance. Com- 
puter Development. Communications. 
Electronic Counter-Measures and Space 
Age Electronics are developed; The Mc- 
Cormick Company, one of the world's 
largest spice firms — not to mention the 
wholesale apparel and textile manufac- 
turers, wholesale lumber and wood 
products companies, furniture manufac- 
turers, jewelry manufacturers, drug and 
chemical manufacturers and electrical 
machinery equipment and supply manu- 
facturers, and many, many others. 

Baltimore is a big city — the tempo is 
slower than that of the cities to the 
north, yet it booms with activity in 
'Baltimore fashion." 

Among the Baltimore Business lead- 
ers is the Oles Envelope Company 
founded in 1912 by the president of the 
firm. Mr. Burdette S. Oles. 

This ever growing progressive firm is 
located on an acre and a quarter of 
land in the central part of the city. The 
plant, which stretches a full city block 
on Loch Raven Road w ith a frontage of 
over 150 feet on 25th Street, has four 
large buildings that are in operation at 
the present time. 

There is 80.000 square feel on one 
level for the manufacturing part of the 
firm — and ample additional land for 
further expansion. 



Finer Foods Since 1858 




Washington. I). ('. 

Official Eating Place 
of the Alumni 

1107 Connecticut Ave. 

Next to 
the Mayflower Hotel 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Wi 



omen 



Mr. Oles, an energetic man, took. 
over the manufacture of envelopes in 
the city and started a new industry for 
Baltimore in the original plant on Lom- 
hard Street. But that plant was soon 
outgrown and in 1924 the site of the 
present plant was started with the first 
unit. Two additions to the parent build- 
ing soon followed as demands of loyal 
customers ordered more and more 
millions of envelopes. 

New and modern machinery is con- 
stantly being added and today the plant 
is recognized as one of the finest of its 
kind in the United States. 

Approximately 150 persons are em- 
ployed and the best possible working 
conditions have been provided, as well 
as a Pension Plan with excellent insur- 
ance provision. 

The Oles Envelope Company boasts 
of 17 employees having had 25 to 45 
years of service with the firm and sixty 
per cent of the rest of the employees 
having been with the company for five 
years or more. 

Mr. Oles, who is a public spirited, 
generous man, has, over the years, been 
interested in raising Registered Here- 
ford cattle. He has been recognized for 
his work in promoting Hereford cattle 
breeding in Maryland and recently was 
awarded a plaque for having organized 
The Registered Polled Hereford Breed- 



UNIVERSAL ELECTRO 
PLATING COMPANY, Inc. 

In Old Georgetown Since 1929 

SPECIALIST 
in 

ANTIQUE 
SILVER 

Copper and Brass Restoration 
Quality Work — Prompt Service 

Hours: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily 

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday 

(1/i block Below M St. N.W.) 

1067 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 
FE 3-2460 Washington, D. C. 





ers' Association in the state. He has also 
received recognition tor showing prize 
Hereford's at the Timonium State Fair 
as well as other state fairs throughout 
the country. 

Mr. Oles greets his many visitors in 
his plush ultra-modern offices with the 
charm and sincerity that sends his visi- 
tors off with a feeling of having visited 
a good friend, a great leader, a loyal 

Baltimorean. 

* * * 

Another business which ranks high 
in Baltimore is the Murray-Baumgartner 
Surgical Supply Company, which has 
been in operation for nearly 35 years. 
They are located at 1421 Maryland 
Avenue near the center of town, which 
puts them in easy reach of four major 
hospitals including University Hospital 
of the University of Maryland and Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. 

The firm moved to its new and mod- 
ern offices about two years ago. The first 



Maryland's 
largest 

and oldest 
furrier 




Fabulous selection of 

MINK STOLES 

from $199 

225 N. Howard St., Baltimore 

Prices plus tax 
Furs labeled country of origin 



frit Travel Everywhere — 

AAFTDODf^l IT A K.I By Steamer ... by Airline ... by Rail 

/V\C I KUl \JL\ I /\IN Independent and Conducted Tours 

I \J\J Klo I V-L/AAr/\N Y Personalized Travel Service Since 1923 

1115 N. Charles Street — Baltimore 1, Maryland • LExin g ton 97300 



eA 'Well Pressed ZMan 'Wears a Viat 

SOUTHCOMB 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 

Stetson Ties 

109 E. BALTIMORE STREET LExington 9-5799 

BALTIMORE, MD. 











OLES 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



Jjaltimore s jrioneer Onvelope ^Manufacturer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. ADams 4-3979 



January - February, 1960 



27 



T«»Of Mtmi 




• TCRLING 

• ■• I 1 000 



'cno 




ompanu inc. 



O/er/ma Dilv'erware 

Chjrl*> alPleasanl Sis Ualllmore-I.Md 



Thompson Furniture 


Co. 


Furniture of Quality 


• 


tit Reasonable Prices 




MODERN & PERIOD 




SIMMONS, KROEHIER, THOMASVILLE, 


BASSETT, GEM CRIB & CRADLE, 


LANE 


1810 Rhode Island Ave., 


N.E. 


Washington, D.C. LA 6-1622 



AVIGNONE FRERES 



Town and Country 

Caterers for 

Luncheons - Teas - Dinners 
Weddings & Cocktail Receptions 

Candy and Other Delicacies 
Gift Packages and Baskets 
Snipped all over the World 



Restaurant 
Luncheons - Dinners 
At Reasonable Prices 

1777 COLUMBIA ROAD, N.W. 

Columbia 5-0332 Washington, D. C. 



4m, 



Maryland f ll/o<me*i 



lloor is occupied by the surgical appli- 
ance department, the general offices, .1 
conference room and storage space 
One-hall ol the first floor is devoted to 

a display and sales area which presents 
a modern, clean and uncluttered view to 
the many professional and lay custom- 
ers uho call daily. 

Customers are greeted b\ a pleasant 
receptionist and it a short wait is neces- 
sary, they can relax in a cheerful recep- 
tion area. Growing plants grace the 
front windows across the full width ol 
the store inside. A decorative accent is 
the fireproof multicolored draperies. 

Instruments and other smaller items 
are kept in lighted display cases. Dark 
polished wood and glass fixtures con- 
trast with the tan vinyl tile floor and 
sparkle under the fluorescent strip light- 
ing set in the acoustical ceiling. 

Part of the display area is di\ided 
into three small rooms for the displa\ 
ol examining room furniture. Each is 
tastefully decorated in a different color 
of the same wall paper design, making a 
pleasing setting for the equipment. 

In the rear of the main Boor are the 
main offices of the executives ot the 

firm: Mr. I.. Miller. President and 
Mr. Richard Lovelace. Vice Presi- 
dent and Treasurer, and Mr. Thomas 
Grottendick. Secretary. 

A unique addition to the first floor 
is a small "dictating room" — here the 
managers and salesmen can dictate their 
correspondence free from noise and 
other distractions. 



I he well equipped repair department 
houses expert craftsmen. These men can 
repair practically every t\pe of instru- 
ment and equipment and also make 
special instruments on request. 

Murray-Baumgartner, through its 
manufacturing and repair department, 
made the first instrument for Dr. Alfred 
Blalock of Johns Hopkins Hospital for 
his tamous work on obstructions of the 
heart arters . 

1 he second floor contains the account- 
ing and bookkeeping offices, a large 
conference room and the surgical appli- 
ance department. This department is 
under the able direction of personnel 
who are experienced in the fitting and 
si_r\ icing of surgical appliances. There 
are three fitting rooms, laboratory for 
the patients and a well-fitted stockroom. 

The third floor is the main stockroom 
tor both large equipment and fast mov- 
ing supplies. The fourth floor is the 
warehouse for bulky items such as furn- 
iture, hospital solutions, etc. Since the 
company does a sizeable rental busi 
one section of this floor is used for the 
storage oi rental beds, wheelchairs, 
pumps, lamps, invalid walkers, physical 
therapy apparatus and crutches. 

The company's entire operations are 
under one roof, enabling them to serve 
hospitals, laboratories, industry, schools 
and nursing and convalescent homes 
with great efficiency. The company's 
territory includes the state of Maryland, 
the District of Columbia, and par; 
Pennsylvania, Delaware and Virginia. 



& 



"Washington's Best Restaurant" 

Holiday Magazine ( 4th Consecutive Year ) 

"One of America's Ten Best" 

Kational Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

Where Statesmen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 

Between the Washington & Willord Hotels 

Open Daily * Sunday 11:30 AM. -1:00 A.M 
Telephone Ol. 7-6467 



Five Beautifully Appoint 







ts. Meetings And Banquets Accommodating 10 To 250 Persons. 

Eiteblished For Over 100 Years 



^ 



28 



THE M:\RVI A N D M A GAZIM 



School of 
DENTISTRY 

(Continued from page 25) 



Hi Cicoiyc Anderson gave a vcr\ 

fine dissertation on Dr. Gerard Dev- 
lin's accomplishments and rise to emi- 
nence and respect, not only among his 
associates in the field of orthodontics. 
but also his associates in the Alumni 
Association. Noteworthy remarks were 
also made by Dr. Saul Gale after 
which Dr. Joseph Martini. President, 
presented Dr. Devlin with the Distin- 
guished Alumni Award. Following a 
standing ovation, Dr. Devlin accepted 
the Award. 

Dr. Joseph Cappuccio, Secretary of 
the National Alumni Association, 
brought greetings from the President. 
Dr. Harry Dressel. Dean Aisenberg re- 
ported on the Harrington Fund and the 
Greater University of Maryland Fund. 
The following were elected to office: 
Dr. Alan Gale. *50, President; Dr. 
Robert Jcrnick. '50. President-Elect; Dr. 
Nicholas Giuditta. "38, Vice President; 
Dr. Elwood Snyder. Jr.. '58, Secretary; 
Dr. Samuel Byer. '27, Treasurer. 
Trustees: Friedberg Memorial Fund: 
Dr. Wm. Joule: Dr. Philip Schwartz, 
'30; Dr. Samuel Abrams, '29; and Dr. 
Jean Ross. 

Members of the Executive Board: 
Dr. Saul Gale. '22; Dr. Gerard Dev- 
lin. '23: Dr. Elwood Snyder, Sr., '01. 



Maine Alumni Section 
Contemplated 

During the very successful meeting of 
the Maine Dental Society held in Rock- 
land, Maine, in June, many of our 
alumni there called a luncheon meeting 
to discuss the possibility of forming a 
section. Our National President, Dr. 
Harry Dressel, and the Chairman of 
the Liaison Committee, Dr. Calvin 
Gaver, visited these members and found 
that a great deal of interest and enthu- 
siasm exists. 

We hope that sometime within the 
near future we will be able to add 
Maine to our ever-increasing number 
of sections. 

Our sincere thanks are expressed to 
Dr. Harry Lyon for inviting us, and 
good luck to our Maine counterpart. 

(Continued on next page) 



CATERING 

---W ill, \ SPEC] \l Tou.-li 

Party Perk ups for Any Occasion or 
Fully Serviced Affairs 



COCKTAIL PARTIES 



OPEN HOUSE 



RECEPTIONS 



BUFFETS 




TEAS 



PICNICS 



LUNCHEONS 



BANQUETS 



• —mi -■•. AvS 



the Casual Gateli+Kf, service 

7651 Old Georgetown Road BETHESDA, MD. 

OLiver 6-1533-4 











WALLOP 


and 


SON 






J. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 


j. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, 


3rd 








Class 


of 1919 




Closs of 1942 












— INSURANCE- 












Fire 


• Automobile • Life • 


Accident ■ 


Liability - Bonds 












EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 




1101 


VERMONT 


AVE., 


N.W.— Suite 405 


Executive 3- 


1400 WASHINGTON 5, D. C. 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO.. Inc. 

Link Belt Company "Pyrene" & "MSA" Industrial 

Power Transmission • "C-0-TW0" • Gas Masks. Canisters 
Supplies Fire Extinguishers & First Aid Equipment 

2600 12th STREET, N.E. WASHINGTON 18, D. C. LAwrence 6-1362 



Thomas E» Claris iric* 

PluttutitUf. and tMeatitva Senuice 

4434 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 

WOodley 6-71 22 Day or Night, WOodley 6-5181 



BRIGGS 

Construction Co., Inc. 

CUSTOM HOMES 

Repairs - Remodeling 



BETHESDA. MD. 



OL 6-4545 



NORTH 
WASHINGTON PRESS 

Inc. 

We Specialize in Printing 
for Churches and Schools 

849 Upshur St., N. W. 

WASHINGTON 1 1 , D. C. 

TAylor 9-3932 



January - February, 1960 



29 




Bacon for 
breakfast 
ft& yoii 




Albert F. Goetze, Inc. 

CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore, Md 




• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. • 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST.. N.W. 
CompU 

AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

St rving 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 
MARYLAND. VIRGINIA AND 
WEST VIRGINIA 

Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

WASHINGTON 9, D. C. 



POSTGRADl \i I ( i)i ELSE is 

Oi'i R \i i\ i Dim imio 

A postgraduate course in "High and 
Ultra High Speeds in Operative Den- 
tistry" was presented by the Depart- 
ment of Operative Dentistrv in coopera- 
tion with the Postgraduate Division of 
the Baltimore ( Ollege Oi Dental Sur- 
gery. Dental School. University of 
Maryland, on Saturday and Sunday. 
October 17 and IX. 1959. 

Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg. Dean, wel- 
comed the 32 practitioners who regis- 
tered tor the two-day course. The par- 
ticipating dentists were from the states 
of Delaware. Maryland. Massachusetts. 
New Hampshire. New Jersey. North 
Carolina, Pennsylvania. Vermont, Vir- 
ginia and West Virginia and from the 
District of Columbia and Israel. 

The course was divided into two 
phases: didactic and clinical. The speak- 
ers participating in the didactic portion 
of the program included Captain George 
W. Ferguson. DC". USN: Captain Arne 
G. Nielsen. DC, USN; Dr. Harold R. 
Stanley; Dr. Lloyd M. Armstrong; and 
Dr. Julian J. Thomas. The clinical 
phase of the course was conducted and 
supervised by the staff of the Depart- 
ment of Operative Dentistry at the 
Dental School. 

On Saturday afternoon the regis- 
trants were given the opportunity to 
evaluate nine different high speed units 
by operating them on extracted teeth. 
On Sunday afternoon patients were pro- 
vided for those who desired to continue 
their evaluation on a clinical basis. All 
the participating members of this course 
had favorable comments regarding the 
value derived from using the different 
units available. With this basic knowl- 
edge they felt that they were capable 
of selecting the unit best suited for 
their individual clinical practices. 

Those registered for the course were: 
Dr. H. Clifford Bauer. Dr. Joseph B. 
Berke. Dr. Ralph A. Brand. Dr. Ben 
Brauer. Dr. Abraham Bromberg. Dr. 
N. J. Capone. Dr. Thomas S. Chandler. 
Dr. Theodore F. Chapin, Dr. Irving J. 
Cierler, Dr. Bryan A. Dickson. Dr. 
Wallace G. Drumheller. Dr. L. Lynn 
Emmart, Dr. Edwin G. Gail, Dr. Julian 
W. Habercam, Dr. Robert C. Hager, 
Dr. Armand S. Hall. Dr. Frank Hurst. 
Dr. F. Kaufman, Dr. Louis E. Kayne, 
Dr. Herbert F. Klingelhofer. Dr. 
Charles R. Milne. Dr. Daniel C. Peters. 
Dr. Joseph Piombino. Jr.. Dr. Kenneth 
R Rankin. Dr. CletUS A. Reed. Dr. 
Robert A. Reed. Dr. Farl D. Ro\ . Dr. 
I. Lee Singer, Dr. .1 ( onway Smith. Dr. 



o 



C^veru ^Jable \Jvertoohs 
/- iclureictue y^ountruilde 

Oiney Inn 

OLNEYWMD. \ - 

"Old Plantation Recipes" 

LUNCHEON • DINNER 
COCKTAILS 



Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 
(Closed Mondays) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

BRIDGE PARTIES. WEDDINGS. 

BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 

OLNEY, MARYLAND 

— AmpU Parking Space — 

PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

Gertrude Allison Brewster, Oivner 



PRINCE GEORGES 
COUNTY 



^'W'S't^ ^ 



BANK of 




LAND 



-/ 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHEONS 






CHARCOAL' 

ffocisd) 
7<te fit f 



26S7 Conn. Ave. N.W.. Washington, D. C. 



30 



ihf Maryland Magazine 



John J. Swalec, Dr. Charles H. Teague, 

and Dr. Bernard Wilkmv 

Speakers at Centbnniai Mm riNG 

At the recent ( entennial Meeting of the 
American Dental Association in New 
York. Dr. Ernest B. Nuttall, '31, read 
a paper, "What Constitutes a Good Di- 
agnosis for Partial Prosthodontics." Dr. 
Nuttall is Professor of the Department 
ol Fixed Partial Prothesis at the Dental 
School. 

Also at this meeting, Mr. Theodore 
J. Noffsinger, Jr.. a senior dental stu- 
dent, gave a table clinic, "Orientation 
of Dies in Working Casts." It is rather 
unusual for a student to be invited to 
participate in a national scientific ses- 
sion. 

Dr. H. Cooper Lectures at 
Dentai School 

Dr. Herbert K. Cooper, Director of the 
Cleft Palate Clinic at Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania, spoke to the members of the 
senior class and guests on "The Clinical 
Management of the Cleft Palate Pa- 
tient," on Tuesday, December 15, 1959, 
at 8:00 p.m. in the Gordon Wilson 
Amphitheatre. 

Dr. Cooper enjoys an international 
reputation for his outstanding contribu- 
tions relative to the integration of serv- 
ices in the treatment of patients with 
cleft palates and cleft lip problems. 

Remembered 

The Alumni Association gratefully ac- 
knowledges the contribution of Mr. and 
Mrs. Raymond K. Tongue, Sr., towards 
the furnishing of one of the meeting 
rooms of the new Student Union Build- 
ing, Baltimore, in memory of their son, 
Dr. R. Kent Tongue, Jr., formerly a 
member of the faculty of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, and 
most loyal alumnus. 



College of 

EDUCATION 

Joan Bookout 



Activities Within the College 

Dr. Glenn O. Blough, Professor of Edu- 
cation, has just had published his latest 
science-nature book, Soon After Sep- 
tember. Dr. Blough, in this seventh book 
of the series, takes the reader for a walk 
(Continued on next page) 




41 

^f Very Impressive Potion 

Tired of ordinary soups 
...try 

CrabalaMaryland 

from the 

Crosse &Elackwell 
Soup Shelf ~~7 




At your grocer's now, or write for 
name of nearest dealer to: Crosse 
& Blackwell, Baltimore 24, Md. 



MARIE C. ARMACOST 




Private Convalescent Home 

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 
Member of National Geriatrics 

Society 
Licensed by Maryland State Nursing 

Home Society 
24 Hour Nursing Service 
Moderate Rates — 

Orderly in Attendance 
DR 7-5225 
812 Regester Ave., Baltimore 12, Md. 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 

and ACCESSORIES 

Let our well-trained staff assist you 

in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 S. CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area since 1919 



THE 
TOWN 
HOUSE 

"Famous for Food In 
the Maryland Tradition" 

Open Daily 

LUNCHEON, COCKTAILS, 
DINNER 

Howard at 27th HO 7-5191 
Baltimore, Md. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located In the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



Bon Ton 
SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON SARATOGA 
CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 
Rear— 1229 D St., S.E. 
LI. 3-4848 Washington 




January - February, 1960 



31 



HAVE YOU 
SEEN THE NEW 
SITE FOR SAVERS? 




Generous Quarterly 

Dividends Will Be 

Paid in 1959 

District 7-2370 

Tin: FirstT(J:i)eral 

ix Wasiiivgtox 

FIRS! II l>l li \l >\\ IM.x \M) LOAN 
ASSOCIATION <M WASHINGTON 

610 — 13th Street, N.W. 

Bethesda Branch 
8216 Wisconsin Avenue 



Half Century of Continuous Stl 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE CO. 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limestone 
Granite Marble 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 

Washington 18, D. C. 



SOUTHEAST TITLE CORP. 

( 'ii \ in, Pn 

|n Y. .1 - Expei ience 
COMPLETE SERVICE 

Washington, D. C. & Maryland 

1343 Good Hope Rd .. S.E. 
LUdlow 1-3200 Washington, DC 



"deep in the woods along the Road of 
Seasons." Jeanne Bendick has provided 
the illustrations lor this book which was 
published b) Whittlese) House 

Dr. Vernon I Anderson. Prolessor 
Ol Education and Dean ol the College 

ol I ducation, gave 'he keynote address 
at the Fall ( onference ol the Teachers' 
Association ol the Independent Schools 

Ol the Baltimore Area Dr. Anderson 
spoke on "Current Trends in Education* 1 
which was the theme ol the conference. 
Dr. Anderson also gave the address at 
the Cecil Count) teachers' Meeting in 
Elkton, Maryland. The title ol his ad- 
dress was. "The Challenge to leaching: 
Our Opportunity." The Maryland De- 
partment of the Association lor Super- 
vision and Curriculum Development has 
elected Dr. Anderson as national repre- 
sentative to the Association tor Super- 
vision and Curriculum Development. 

Dr. M. Clemens Johnson. Associate 
Professor of Education, will present a 
paper entitled. Multivariate Classifica- 
tion: Application and Interpretation in 
Educational Decision Making, at the 
February. I960, meeting of the Ameri- 
can Educational Research Association 
in Chicago. The general topic for this 
year's meeting will be New Develop- 
ments in Experimental Design and Sta- 
tistical Analysis. 

Mrs Rose Mane Orentzcr. Professor 
ol Music, has prepared a selected bibli- 
ography of audio-visual aids entitled. 
Music Education Materials. This pam- 
phlet, published by the Journal of Re- 
search in Music Education, contains a 
general listing of currently available 
books and pamphlets on music educa- 
tion. 

Dr. Orval Ulry, Associate Professor 
of Education and Director of Summer 
Session, has written an article for The 
Challenge of Science Education which 
is published by the Philosophical Li- 
brary. This article entitled. "Activities 
of the Federal and State Governments," 
deals with the activities oi the Federal 
and State governments in science edu- 
cation and their relation to the whole of 
the education program. 



Mrs, roYi Becomes Playwrkjiti 

A former student of the College of Edu- 
cation. Mrs Selma Mason 'love, who 
received her M.Ed, degree in 1957. has 
written for the November. 1959, issue 
Ol The Instructor a play entitled \ 
Week with Hooks." This play was com- 
posed with emphasis on literature: but. 
since it was also tied in with the music 



HARVEY DAIRY 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 

SERVING PRINCE GEORGES 
and MONTGOMERY COUNTIES 

your Neighbors 
Buy Our Milk 



Vitamin D Homogenized Milk 

Grade A Pasteurized Milk 

Eitra Rich Homogenized 

Vitamin D Milk 

Cultured Buttermilk 

Fat Free Milk 

Chocolate Milk 

Butter-Sweet Cream 

Cottage Cheese 

Eggs — Strictly Fresh 

Half and Half 

Sour Cream 

Table Cream 

Whipping Cream 

Margarine 

Fresh Orange Juice 



APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 



NOW APPEARING 

CHARLIE BYRD 

f After c-~r'e: -; a mcgcsM E^opeaii Concert Tourl 

His Guitar and JAZZ Trio 

Excellent Cocktails • Wonderful Food 



i BETHESDA CINDEF 


! BLOCK I 


■ MANUFACTURING 


CO., Inc. j 


■ . . . /. , . 


°f : 


I MASONRY SUPPLIES : 


1 BRICK - CINDER 


BLOCS I 


; River Rd. at B & O R.R. 


OL 4-1616 J 


I BETHESDA, MD. 



2477 18th St. N.W. 

at Columbia Road 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



32 



the Maryiwd Magazine 



program, musical versions ol familiar 
stories were used. Mrs [bye is currently 
Music Resource readier in the Calvert 
County, Maryland Schools. 

I o\ theaters for elementary children 
as an aid to breaking through the lan- 
guage harrier are currently being use J 
in 75 cities throughout the United 
Stales and in eight foreign countries. 
Inspiration lor this project, which is 
sponsored In the Children's Museum of 
Washington, came about through a 
University of Maryland class in "'lan- 
guage Arts in the Elementary School"' 
which is taught by Miss Mar) Lewis. 

Dr. James L Hymes. Jr.. Director of 
Childhood Education, was the featured 
speaker at a conference on more effec- 
ti\e learning tor children in the space 
age. held at the University of Toledo 
recently. His talk was titled "Toward 
More Efficient I.earninsi for Children." 



Industrial Education 

Mr. Edmund Crosby, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Industrial Education, recently 
participated in the national meetings of 
the National Safety Council held in Chi- 
cago. Illinois. Mr. Crosby serves as a 
liaison person between the American 
Industrial Arts Association and the Na- 
tional Safety Council. He also is chair- 
man of the Safety Committee of the 
A.I.A.A. 

Dr. Paul E. Harrison, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Industrial Education, served as 
a member of an evaluation team of the 
Middle States Association for both the 
graduate and undergraduate programs 
at the State Teachers College, Millers- 
ville, Pennsylvania. This same commit- 
tee served in a similar capacity for the 
National Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education. 

Dr. Donald Maley, Professor and 
Head of Industrial Education, was the 
speaker at the Fall Conference of the 
Western New York Region of Industrial 
Arts Teachers held at State Teachers 
College, Buffalo, New York. Dr. Maley 
addressed the morning general session 
on the topic "Teaching for Individual 
Differences." He also was the principal 
speaker at the evening banquet. Dr. 
Maley was accompanied on this trip by 
Kenneth Dawson and James Rokusek, 
doctoral students in the Department, 
and by Alan Keeny, teacher of Indus- 
trial Arts at the Montgomery Hills Jun- 
ior High School. Mr. Keeny is an alum- 
nus of the Department. 

Paul Manchak, Jack Berge, and Lar- 
ry Furtaw are in charge of a television 

(Continued on next page) 



ftenW*** 




JOHN M. WALTON 



GIVE 

to the 

MARCH 

of DIMES 

DENNIS W. MADDEN 



A. H. 


SMITH 


SAND 
GRAVEL 








Branchville 


CONCRETE 

ACDUAIT n A U 1 Kl r 




Phone 
WEbster 5-5200 


AdrnALI r A V 1 N «j 

Plants: 


Branchville, Md. 




Brandywine, Md. 




Curtis Bay, Baltimore, Md. 



QUcute^ CfGA,a<j,e 



24 -HOUR TOWING SERVIC 

WArfield 7-9710 



7505 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



THE SOUTHERN PLATE ( iLASS (0. ss=== 

IIZI^^ZZZZ^I^IZZIZZ^ZZZI^^I^ZZ &/Lai.± and <J\l\£.tal (Lonizactori. 
2519 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE 
BALTIMORE 17. MARYLAND 



LAFAYETTE 3-7200 



January - February, 1960 



33 



53rd ANNIVERSARY 
Organized 1906 




ARUNDEL FEDERAL 

SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Sate Deposit Boies 

Community Hall tor Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25. Md. ELgin 5-9300 



FRANKLIN UNIFORM CO. 

Uniform Satisfaction 

PHYSICIANS DENTISTS NURSES 

MAIDS WAITRESSES BEAUTICIANS 

— Stores Located — 



235 PARK AVENUE 900 11th ST. N.W. 

BALTO. 1, MD. WASH. 1, D.C. 

MU 5-7222 EX 3-8200 

712 E. GRACE ST. 515 BOUSH ST. 

RICHMOND 19, VA. NORFOLK 10, VA. 

Ml 4 2685 MA 7-3639 



Career in Business 

Day & Evening Classes 
Complete Courses 

Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

Stenographic, Junior Accounting. 

Write or Phone for Catalogue 

STRAYER COLLEGE 
18 N. Charles St. LE 9-5626 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 
Phone VErnon 7-8400 
Baltimore, Md. 
ii n i n iipi m iiii .n ii n iiii 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



research project reeenils Started in the 
Industrial Education Department. I he 
project is concerned with "close scru- 
tiny" television applications in the 
teaching oi Industrial Education. I he 
equipment used in the stud) involves a 
transistor camera, 2 I -inch monitor and 
auxiliary facilities. 

Joose Yfi, Irving Herrick and James 
Heins are currently developing a wind 
tunnel lor use in an Industrial Arts pro- 
gram research project. The wind tunnel 
will be used as the center of a series of 
exploratory activities designed to broad- 
en the experiences of students in the 
senior high school Industrial Arts pro- 
grams. 

Staff members in the Industrial Edu- 
cation Department had participated in 
over thirty off-campus lectures, speech- 
es, conferences, or institutes this school 
year up until Thanksgiving vacation 
period. In addition to the numerous en- 
gagements in Maryland the staff partici- 
pated in educational activities in New 
Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and 
Virginia. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 



R. M. Rivello 



George Webster Elected 

Mr. George C. Webster, M.E. '43, has 
been named the first president of a 
newly formed nationwide Association of 
Management Consultants. The Associa- 
tion will assist in the improvement of 
small businesses by enabling them to 
understand and utilize the services of 
management consulting firms. It plans 
to draw up ethical standards of practice 
tor its members, establish criteria by 
which small businesses can select com- 
petent specialists in management, and 
develop improved techniques for man- 
agement consultants. 

Mr. Webster is also president of the 
Wilson Supply Co., Inc.. and a former 
president of the Electric Institute of 
Washington, the Washington Associa- 
tion of Plumbing Contractors, and the 
Washington Appliance Radio-TV Deal- 
ers' Association. 



Dr. Paui D. Arthur Lectures 

Dr. Paul D. Arthur. M.E. 44 and M.S. 
'4s>. recently gave a series of eight lec- 
uires on supersonics, hypersonics, and 



CARLEA 

/ In House of 
BRAND NAME 



Sanitation Chemicals 

AND 

Janitor Supplies 

S1MONIZ 

— Cleoners and Waxes 

BRILLO 

— Steel Wool Floor and 
Hand Pads 

BLACK & DECKER 

— Commercial 
Vacuums 

GENERAL 

— Electric — Floor 

Scrubbing & Polishing Machines 

CARLEA JANITOR SUPPLY CO. 

516 W. Franklin St. 
MU 5-5608 Baltimore 1, Md. MU 5-5269 



King Bros., Inc. 

PRINTING 6 OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



MARYLAND CHIEF 




TOMATOES 



Packed 
By 



J. LANGRALL & BRO. INC. 

CANNERS SINCE 1878 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The "Handy" Line 

Baltimore. Md. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1 , Md. 



34 



the Maryland Magazine 



orbital mechanics to engineers and sci- 
entists of the Republic Aviation Corp. 
Dr. Arthur who is an official ol the 
I os Angeles Systems Corporation ol 
Vmerica also acts as a consultant to 
Republic. 

C.E. Grabs Present Papers 

All three of the papers presented at the 
October l c >th morning session of the 
Soils and Foundations Divisions of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers 
Annual Convention in Washington, 
D. C, were presented hy University of 
Maryland graduates. Those who spoke, 
and the title of their papers, are as fol- 
lows: Edward J. Zeigler, '46, of Rum- 
mel, Klepper and Kahl, Consulting En- 
gineers, Baltimore, Maryland, "Road- 
way Embankments over Unstable River 
Deposits in the District of Columbia;" 
James P. Naurot, '55, Washington Sub- 
urban Sanitary Commission, "Soil Tests 
and Observed Movements of Standpipes 
and Reservoirs;" Edward S. Barber, '35, 
Civil Engineering Department, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, "Engineering Proper- 
ties of Potomac Clay." 



Whereabouts 

James E. Malcolm, Ch.E. '42, is Chief 
of the Fire Suppression Section, U. S. 
Army Engineer Research and Develop- 
ment Laboratories at Fort Belvoir, Vir- 
ginia. He is project engineer in charge 
of the development of Bromotrifluoro- 
methane as a fire extinguishing agent 
which has been applied in aircraft ex- 
tinguishing systems. He has also di- 
rected evaluation of foam and fog noz- 
zles for production of foam spray for 
application in crash fire fighting. 

R. F. Bartelmes, C.E. '36, is Chief 
of the Special Equipment Branch and 
Irwin Schumacher, M.E. '42, is Project 
Engineer in the Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Department at Engineer Research 
and Development Laboratories. 

Gordon Smith, '50, of 3816 Summit 
Terrace, Sparta, New Jersey, has ac- 
cepted a position as a Project Engineer 
with AeroChem Research Laboratories 
in Princeton, New Jersey. 

Colonel William E. Roberts, '31, has 
been appointed Professor and Head of 
Military Science and Tactics at West 
Virginia University. Col. Roberts has 
just returned from a tour of duty as 
chief of staff of the Iceland defense 
force. 

(Continued on next page) 



THE 



BALTIMORE ASPHALT 
BLOCK and TILE CO. 



BABCO 

HOT ASPHALT PAVEMENTS 

• private driveways 

• industrial yards 
for • service stations 

• playgrounds 

• parking areas 



general 
contractors 



1320 N. MONROE ST. 

Call: MAdison 3-4346 



BALTIMORE 17, MD. 



(2) erving 




(LglsigPl I 




THE PUBLIC OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS Njg/ 


■Jhe 


sjohti 


<Jj. <=Luca5 j-^nntina L^ompanu 








26th and SISSON STREETS 








BALTIMORE 11, MD. 








Phone BElmont 5-8600 



Since 1935 



ROADS BY 
DRUMMOND AND COMPANY Inc. 



Phone: Circle 2-3030 



Race Road, Baltimore 27, Md. 



iot* 



61*1 



t lO* 



V K* 1 



TO l * 






January -February, 1960 



35 



To Save Time . . . 
To Save Money . . . 
In Your Business 

This is our job ... to help design 
forms that get work done faster and 
easier . . . lo produce forms by the 
most economical methods adaptable 
to your needs. 




The Baltimore Business Forms spe- 
cialist in your community is a man 
devoted to a career of designing 
forms that save you time . . . save you 
money. Consult him whenever you 
think of business forms. 

Baltimore Business Forms 



Phone Gilmor 5-8000 

Talbot (Tol) T. Speer (Class of 1917) 

Charles F. Ellinger (Class of 1937) 



'. MUlberry 5-2823 Established 1876 ■ 




; Jbmltli i JSook ^>toxs. : 




• MEMBER ABAA 




; OLD, RARE AND OUT-OF-PRINT BOOKS ; 




; MARYLAND BOOKS - SCHOLARLY BOOKS J 




'. 805 N. HOWARD ST. '. 




\ Baltimore 1, Md. " 




I ALLEN W. SCHULTZ '. 





VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



Bernard Bernstein, MS. '54, has been 
appointed manager ot Navy System* 

Design at the Oswego, New York, facil- 
it\ ot IBM's Federal Systems Division. 



C. w. B(k,\s. Chairman 01 Board 

Mr. C. Warren Bogan. E.E. "32. is 
Chairman of the D. C. Board ot Exam- 
iners for Professional Engineers. Mr. 
Bogan is with the firm of consulting en- 
gineers of C. Warren Bogan and Asso- 
ciates of Bethesda. Maryland. He is also 
I reasurer of the Engineering Confer- 
ence Board for Industry and a past 
President of the D. C. Society of Pro- 
fessional Engineers. 



Faculty Notes 

The following appointments and pro- 
motions have been made to the faculty 
of the College of Engineering. Appoint- 
ments: Dr. G. S. S. Ludford — Visiting 
Professor of Aeronautical Engineering: 
Mr. W. G. Mullen — Instructor in Civil 
Engineering; Dr. G. P. Rutelli — Asso- 
ciate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing: Mr. N. P. Lloyd — Instructor in 
Mechanical Engineering: Mr. C. H. 
Marks — Instructor in Mechanical En- 
gineering; Mr. R. B. Oetting — Instructor 
in Mechanical Engineering. 

Dr. Dick Duffey has been promoted 
to Professor of Chemical Engineering. 



Service News 

Harry P. Davis, Jr., *59, was graduated 
recently from the Navy's Officer Candi- 
date School in Newport, Rhode Island. 
Mr. Davis now holds the rank of 
Ensign. 

Thomas J. Malloy. '59. was commis- 
sioned a Navy Ensign recently upon 
completion of 16 weeks of training at 
the Naval School of Pre-Flight in Pen- 
sacola. Florida. His brother, Conrad. 
B.P.A. '58, was present for the com- 
missioning ceremony. 



Rev. R. W. Soma Instai i ed 

Mr. Robert W. Sonen. C.E. '34. was in- 
stalled as minister of the First Unitarian 
Church. Coral Gables. Florida. Mr. 
Sonen previously served in Tulsa. Okla- 
homa, for 15 years. He has been a board 
member of Meadville Theological 
School and President of the Southwest- 
ern Unitarian Conference. 



Why $jS!E?^ is 
mnRVLRtlD'5 FltlESI [ORtl 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in can.- with- 
in the hour it 
pulled from the 
stalk. 




SHOE PEG 



or 



GOLDEN 



SWEET 



■ 

' WHITE SWEET CORN 
— Packed by 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO.. Inc. 

PERRYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE. MD. 

Main Office, Perryman/ Md. 

Phone Aberdeen, 621 -J 



PESTS? 



"Call 7k* 



TERMITES? 



?o4s Man" 




PtlST Control SINCE i860 



C. Walts Porter, Mgr. 
SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



ZSSKAV 

lftQUALITYflr 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
8ttre to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
Wm. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDLE CO. 



36 



nir Mary i \sn M w; a/ini 



School ot 

LAW 



Dr. <»'. Kenneth Reiblich 



I'l u ! Ml N I l OMMI M I I \rrm\ 1 1 l> 

Miss Mar) Arabian. President of the 
1 .i\\ School Alumni Association, recent- 
K announced the appointment of a 

Placement Committee for the I aw 
School. 

Miss Arabian pointed out that place- 
ment is one of the prime problems con- 
fronting law students and recent grad- 
uates and that having a means by which 
students may be put in contact with 
prospective employers is of great im- 
portance. She also mentioned the desira- 
bility of establishing a permanent bu- 
reau as a clearing house lor part time 
and summer employment of prospective 
attorneys and for placing graduates in 
permanent legal employment. 

The present Committee will study the 
feasibility of establishing a permanent 
placement bureau, make recommenda- 
tions to the Executive Committee of the 
Alumni Association, and in the event a 
bureau is established will serve as such 
Placement Bureau Committee during 
Miss Arabian*s term as President of the 
Alumni Association. 

In order to obtain the broadest pos- 
sible support for the program from the 
alumni, the Committee appointed by 
Miss Arabian is composed of leading 
lawyers in the various counties of the 
state and in Baltimore so that alumni 
will be active in the operations of the 
Placement Bureau. 

Members of the Committee are: Nor- 
man P. Ramsay, Chairman; Ambrose 
T. Hartman, Leonard S. Freedman, 
Samuel J. Fisher, Christopher H. Fore- 
man, G. Kenneth Reiblich, Clark Mur- 
phy, Jr., Jack L. Hardwick, Frederick 
J. Green, Jr., Judge Edwin Harlan, John 
Martin Jones, Jr., Emma S. Robertson, 
Hon. Leon H. A. Pierson and Norman 
V. Waltjen, Jr., all of Baltimore. 

Hon. Stanford Hoff, Westminster; 
William M. Loker, Jr., Leonardtown; 
Hon. James Getty, Cumberland; Hon. 
William J. McWilliams, Annapolis; Mrs. 
Doris P. Scott, Elkton; Judge W. Albert 
Menchine, Towson; and Hamilton P. 
Fox, Salisbury. 

Law School Alumni President 
Named Sybert Assistant 

The Attorney General of Maryland, Mr. 
C. Ferdinand Sybert, recently appointed 

(Continued on next page) 



BARBER & ROSS CO. 

EST. 1876 

2323 - 4th St. N. E. Washington, D. C. 

DEcatur 2-0501 



FREE DELIVERY 



FREE PARKING 



SUPPLIER & DISTRIBUTOR Of THESE MAJOR ITEMS 

Builders Hardware — Power Tools — Package Homes 

Major Appliances — Structural Steel — Lumber 

Jalousie Doors — Aluminum Windows — Millwork 

Paint — General Hardware — Kitchen Cabinets 

Metal Bucks & Doors 



J. H. De VEAU & SON, Inc. 



General Contractors 



ROADS 

DRIVEWAYS 

PIPE 



EXCAVATION 

BUILDINGS 

CONCRETE 



CONCRETE SAWS 



4100 Jones Bridge Road 



North Chevy Chase, Md. 




H ^g^er 



BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"feecotne duality Gandcioui." 

PLANT: 621-27 G STREET, N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVIUE MD. WArfield 7-0880 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 

928 EYE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 1. D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

Land Planning and Subdivision 

6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUniper 9-7508 



January - February, 1960 



37 



See and Drive the 1960 Ford 



SALES 



zzfact 



SERVICE 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

31 10 Hamilton Street 
HYATTSVItLE, MD. 

Phone AP 7-01 10 



MARYLAND'S FINEST FOOD 

The Coffee Room 
Anne Key's Kitchen 

^"Francis Scott Key JtaUl 

FREDERICK 



PURE 



Meat Products 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 
A Maryland Institution 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Haiti more- Washing ton Houlevard 

2 Mill-- Ninth I riiM-i-il v i >f Maryland 

\ \ \ Duncan Ilim-- Restaurant 

Heat Air Conditioning Free TV 

Room Phones WEbster :.-i-.vj 



WArficId 7-8538 

HEATING 
PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
JOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF, Inc. 

6313 • 46th Ave. Riverdole, Md. 



Miss Mi. \rabian. '44. as an assistant. 
I Ik- appointment is a continuation ol 
Mi Sybeit's pohcs ol assigning women 
to his legal stall. 

A yeai ago. Miss Arabian was ap- 
pointed to the stall ol former ( it) Solici- 
tor, Hugo A. Ricciuti. She was described 

by the Atlornev deneral as "an out- 
standing woman lawyer." 

MR. ( \KSON Al'POIN I 1 I) 

Robert (arson, 24-year-old junior stu- 
dent in the School ol Law, has been 
appointed chairman of the Armed Serv- 
ices Committee of the American Law 
Students Association, a subsidiary of 
the American Bar Association. 

Mr. Carson, whose home is in Has re 
de Grace, attended McDonogh School 
and Cornell University before receiving 
his A.B. degree from Gettysburg Col- 
lege. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 

At the University of Maryland School 
of Law, Mr. C arson serves on the Board 
ol the Maryland Law Review. He is a 
second lieutenant in the Adjutant Gen- 
eral's Corps, U. S. Army Reserve. He is 
married and has a 10-month-old bov. 



Law Students Sponsor Party 
at Hospital 

Members of the Baltimore Colts enter- 
tained children at University Hospital 
at the annual Thanksgiving Party spon- 
sored by freshman Law School students. 

The party, held November 23, in the 
rotunda of the hospital's fifth floor, also 
featured comedy films. Each child re- 
ceived a toy and ice cream and cookies 
were served. 

The party was planned by Mary 
Northrop, nursing supervisor of the pe- 
diatric wards, in collaboration with 
committee members Nancy Milan. 
James Beach. R. F. Humphries. Fenton 
Cordell, H. F. Leonnig. and D. C. D. 
Meise. chairman. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Dr. d uirison Hi \os AGP 
i\ North Caroi in \ 

Dr. Ralph B. Garrison, '33, was recent!) 
installed as President oi the North Caro- 
lina Acaderm ol deneral Practice. 



THE =======^== 

LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Ljour ^friendly ^htoiti 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences, 

Phone AP 7-4493 

For Reservation- 

Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 

COLLEGE PARK, MI). 



Buy Defense Bonds 
Every Payday 

J. H. F. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St. S. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

Virgina 



ond South 
Northwest 
and Suburban 
Baltimore 



Phone 
Lincoln 3-8151 

Phone 
LOckwood 5-3556 



MEdford 3-6500 
OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 
MARYLAND 



WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 

Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION WITHOUT 
OBLIGATION 

4904 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 16, D. C 
EMerson 3-9660 



KIDUJELL & KIDUJELL, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 

WEbster 5-4500 MD. 



RESTORFF MOTORS 

Sales /VG&tI' Service 

7323 BALTIMORE BLVD • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



38 



IHI VlARYl A N D M A G A Z I N E 



Dr. GarriSOD has practiced in Ham- 
let, North Carolina since 1 1 >34, and Ik- 
is active in church, civic, and sports af- 
fairs as well as professional ones. He is 
a member of the Richmond County, 
North Carolina. Southern and American 
Medical societies. 



Dr. Tut klk \i Mayo 

Dr. Alhert L. Tucker, '56, has been ap- 
pointed a fellow in plastic surgery in the 
Mayo Foundation at Rochester, Minne- 
sota. The Mayo Foundation is a part 
of the Graduate School of the Univer- 
sitv of Minnesota. 



Dr. Hepner Joins Staff 

Dr. Ray Hepner, formerly of the Uni- 
versity of Missouri School of Medicine, 
has joined the staff of the School of 
Medicine as Professor of Pediatrics. 

Dr. Hepner will direct the newborn 
nursery and premature nursery at Uni- 
versity Hospital and will also conduct 
the well baby clinic in the hospital's out- 
patient department, under the direction 
of the Baltimore City Health Depart- 
ment. 

Dr. Hepner's chief interest in re- 
search is the health of the fetus and the 
newborn child. He is also conducting 
a teaching program about the fetus and 
the newborn. 

A project involving study of the pos- 
sible effect of unsaturated fat on pla- 
cental degeneration and fetal abnormali- 
ties, which he was conducting at the 
University of Missouri with the support 
of the U. S. Public Health Service, will 
be continued at the University of Mary- 
land. 

Dr. Hepner says that although the 
role of dietary fat in hardening of the 
arteries is being investigated widely, 
this approach to the study of the pla- 
centa and fetus has not been given com- 
parable attention. Recent work of Pro- 
fessor Hideo Nagai in Japan, however, 
shows a direct correlation between in- 
fant mortality and blood levels of cer- 
tain unsaturated fats. 

Another research project that Dr. 
Hepner will continue at Maryland con- 
cerns the effects of high concentrations 
of oxygen in pregnant rats on develop- 
ment of the fetal eye and nervous sys- 
tem. This project is being conducted 
with the aid of the Arnold Reuben 
Fight for Sight Award of the National 
Council to Combat Blindness. 

(Continued on next page) 



STANLI^ COAL 



HEATS THE 



University of Maryland 



STANLEY COAL CO. 



WHOLESALE and RETAIL 



Crellin 



Maryland 




FEEDS 

SEEDS 

FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



( Feed MO 3-3113 

FREDERICK \ 

( Petroleum MO 3-5422 
THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 



NORMAN S. 

EARLEY & SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 

435 E. BALTIMORE ST. 
Hagerstown, Maryland 

^— CLASS 1947 — — 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

• Established 1859 • 

Crushed Stone - Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PLANTS 

Stephen City 

Middletown, 

Frederick, 

Lime Kiln, 


, Va. 
Va. 
Md. 

Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 

Main Office — Monument 3-3104 

Frederick, Md. Plant 

Monument 2-1181 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 
Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK. MD. 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

Every kind of Insurance 

110 W. Patrick St. Frederick. Md. 



SEALTEST FOODS 

Division of 

National Dairy Products Corp. 

For the "Best" in Dairy Products 

Buy Sealtest 

ADams 2-1011 



January - February, 1960 



39 



The gathering phm- for 
Marylander$ <>[ Good Taste 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 

1730 L Street 
(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 



Open 'til Midnight— Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 



mn* 



MILLER and 
LONG CO., Inc 

Concrete Construction 

5506 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 
Washington 15, D. C. 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 
Near University of Maryland 

WArfidd 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE. MD. 



TOWER 9-6204: 



JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading as 

KIERNAN'S 

l ( 'ompli ■■ / ' • "■• B( ■ > rages 

8200 Bollimore Blvd. College Pork, Md. 



i)r Hepner in a native ol ( alifornia 
ami received his medical education at 
the (Jniversit) ol < bicago School oi 
Medicine, where he also served his resi- 
dency, was Benjamin J Rosenthal Re- 
search I cllow m Pediatrics, and instruc- 
tor in pediatrics 

After two years as Assistant Professor 

Ol Pediatrics at the Medical Branch ol 

the (Jniversit) ol rexas, Dr. Hepner 
went to the [Jniversit) ol Missouri in 
1954, where he was promoted from As- 
sociate Professor to Professor of Pedi- 
atrics in 1958. 

As a medical officer ol the I S 
Naval Reserve. Dr. Hepner ser\ed his 
internship in the U. S. Naval Hospital 
in San Diego in 1944-45 and saw tut) 
periods of active duty — in 1945-46 and 
1952-54. 



NIH Grant to Pathology Di m 

A $125,000 grant from the National In- 
stitutes of Health has been made to the 
Department of Pathology to support the 
training of medical students, postdoc- 
toral fellows, and pathology residents in 
experimental pathology for the next five 
years. 

In announcing the grant. Dr. Harlan 
I. Firminger, Professor of Pathology 
and Head of the Department, said that 
a training program in experimental pa- 
thology had been started in 1956 under 
the direction of Dr. Lester Kiefer, As- 
sistant Professor of Pathology. 

An experimental approach to pathol- 
ogy is needed. Dr. Firminger explains, 
because ordinary study of surgical or 
postmortem tissues is like looking at 
isolated frames out of a motion picture. 
Disease is a dynamic process and can be 
understood only by observing its con- 
stantly changing characteristics. 

Few training programs in pathology 
today include experimental pathology. 
The small number of pathologists who 
complete their training each year are 
now aearly all being employed by hos- 
pitals to diagnose clinical conditions in 
patients and to stud) postmortem tis- 
sues. As a result, pure pathology — the 
science of the cause and manifestation 
oi disease — has sulTered for lack oi 
experimental pathologists. 

To correct this situation, the National 
Institutes of Health began two \ears ago 
to offer grants to encourage the Stud) 
of pathological processes in living tis- 
sues as a continuous chain oi events. 

Drs. Firminger and Kiefer are now 
developing, as part of the regular course 
in patholog) at the (Jniversit) of Marx- 
land School of Medicine, opportunities 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

ITS THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 
3°o Interest on Savings 

• 

Ail in inist ration Hnil'liny 

6495 New Hampshire Ave.. 
Hyattsville, Md. 

HYATTSVILLE — SILVER SPRING 

JUniper 8-5000 Member F.D.I.C. 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

15710 Colesville Road 
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



FRANK B. JONES 

OPTICIAN 

Over 30 Fears Experience 

Dispensing and Manufacturing 
Modern Eye Wear 

Completi Optical Laboratory 
on I'ii n 

JUniper 9-8780 

8482 Fenton St. Silver Spring, Md. 



Class 1928 
Insurance of all Kinds 

UNion 4-1 100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



40 



the Maryland Magazim 



lor students to induce disease in labora- 
tory animals and to stud) its progress 
\tu-i completing a few classical experi- 
ments, each studenl performs an origi- 
nal experiment or variant of an estab- 
lished experiment and reports his results 
in writing in a form suitable lor publi- 
cation. 



Hospitai Receives Recognition 

University Hospital's pioneer service in 
the American Hospital Association was 
recognized at the October 27 meeting 
Ol Mars land-D.C. -Delaware Hospital 
Association conference by the awarding 
of a certificate of recognition. 

The award was accepted by W. Vic- 
tor Maconachy. Assistant Controller, 
who has served University Hospital lor 
35 years. It was presented by Mr. Ken- 
neth Williamson, Associate Director of 
the American Hospital Association. 



Dr. Brody Appointed Director of 
The Psychiatric Institute 

Dr. Eugene B. Brody has been appoint- 
ed chairman of the Department of Psy- 
chiatry and Director of The Psychiatric 
Institute. The appointment was made by 
the University's Board of Regents. 

Dr. Brody joined the University of 
Maryland faculty in 1957 as Professor 
of Psychiatry and was appointed Psy- 
chiatrist-in-Chief to University Hospi- 
tal and The Psychiatric Institute in 
1958. Since the death of Dr. Jacob E. 
Finesinger in June of this year he has 
been Acting Chairman of the Depart- 
ment and Acting Director of The Psy- 
chiatric Institute. 

Before coming to Maryland, Dr. 
Brody was Associate Clinical Professor 
at the Yale University School of Medi- 
cine, where he also received his grad- 
uate training in psychiatry after receiv- 
ing his medical degree at Harvard Medi- 
cal School in 1944. He is also a grad- 
uate of the New York Psychoanalytic 
Institute. A native of Missouri, he re- 
ceived his bachelor's and master's de- 
gree in psychology at the University of 
Missouri. 

During his tenure at Yale, Dr. Brody 
was attending psychiatrist at the Yale 
Medical Center and Psychiatric Institute 
and chief of the neuropsychiatry serv- 
ice at the West Haven Veterans' Admin- 
istration Hospital. 

While serving military duty in 1946- 
48 he was chief of psychiatry in several 

(Continued on next page) 




for Embassy 



for E 



xcellence 




Now, More Than Ever Before 

EMBASSY DAIRY Products Are Distinguished 

By Quality, Purity, Superior "Goodness" 

and Embassy Dairy Service Unsurpassed By 

Any Other — Call Now for Delivery of 

EMBASSY DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Washington, D. C. DUpont 7-1441 



JUniper 9-4580 



JUniper 9-3340 



A. MYRON COWELL Inc. 

MASONRY- CONTRACTORS 

8416 Ramsey Ave. Silver Spring, Md 

WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 

HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Spring" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co. 



C D. C. Ignition ^ 
Headquarters 

Inc. 

• Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and motor troubles 

• Tune up . . . 

• Specialty repairs . . . 

• United Motors . . . 

• Bowers Batteries — Mallory 
Ignition . . . 

authorized service: carburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 

Phone: FEderal 7-7038 

1230 20th St., N.W. 

V^ Washington, D. C. J 



£esutina iiudenil attd. 

auatuu oft the 

litniu&iiitq, oft 

MoAylcutd 

35 l/eate 

lusnnE nicHOLson 

OUUmo-ULz 

Phil J.uAJme . . . 
head oft* bath companies 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



January - February, 1960 



41 



S v v s S v S s 

* $ 

\I\I.K s 

MISSKD! s 




93rd CONSECUTIVE 
semi-annual 

DIV1 DEN D 

MAS BEEN PAID TO 
SAVERS at 

FRATERNITY 

FEDERAL 

SAVINGS and LOAN ASSX. 

7*54-770 Washington Blvd. 

Gel Yol'K share of the next dn 
open youi INSURED FRATERNITY 
Federal SAVINGS account TODA^ 

OPEN: Daily 9 to 2 
FRIDAYS 'til 8:30 P.M. 



* 



Mail 



Or 



Up-Se 



WF£*H$ 



HOTEL 



'PLY CO. 



EST. 



Purvtyort of Fin* 19& 

MEATS ■ POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Pood Sprcijltiei 

T« H.in,. 

Initlt.tl.ni, Skill, 

Cllil. Eti. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 
227 S. 

Hanover St. 



BALTIMORE. MD. 



PURITAN 
COMPRESSED 
GAS 
CORPORATION 

RACE & McCOMAS STS. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



d5arct--Sfuon School 
etarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 

80r. X. Charles St. YE. 7-1165 

Baltimore, Md. 



<3» O O 3> *> «p •» <tP I 



hospitals m the European ( ommand 

and consultant to the International Mili- 
tary Inbunal in Nuremberg. 

I)r Brod) is a member ol main na- 
tional scientific and professional socie- 
ties, a fellow ol the American Psychi- 
atric Association, and a diplomate ol the 
American Board ol Psvchiatrv and Neu- 
rology, lor which he also serves as 

examiner. 

Locally, he is consultant to the slate 
mental hospitals and the I S Veterans 
Hospital at I'errv Point, a member ol 
the Advisor\ ( ommission to the State 
Department ol Mental Hygiene, a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of the 
Metropolitan Baltimore Association lor 
Mental Health, and a teaching analyst 
on the faculty of the Baltimore Psycho- 
analytic Institute. 

Dr. Brody's published papers range- 
in interest from the psysiology and bio- 
chemistry of mental illness to the exami- 
nation of psychoanalytic concepts. His 
book Psychotherapy with Schizophren- 
ics, published in 1952. is now in its 
fourth printing. 



School of 

NURSING 



Lillie M. Largex 



Expanded Program Aided by Grants 

An additional award of $43,535 has 
been made to the School of Nursing by 
the U. S. Public Health Service, bring- 
ing total USPHS funds awarded to the 
School for 1959-60 to $196,135. These 
funds will be used to prepare additional 
administrators, teachers, and supervisors 
in nursing. 

As part of the school's expanded pro- 
gram, a course in administration in 
nursing has been added. It is being 
taught by Dr. Edna Treasure, former 
Professor of Hospital and Nursing Ad- 
ministration. Catholic University of 
America, and now chief of hospital 
standards and inspection. Bureau of 
Public Health Nursing. Washington. 
D. c . 

Another innovation soon to be made 
will be addition o\ clinical experience in 
tuberculosis nursing to the baccalaure- 
ate program. Baltimore CitJ Hospitals 
will make available the facilities of their 
tuberculosis unit to senior students in 
medical and surgical nursing, who will 
work under direction of a faculty mem- 
ber of the School ol Nursing. 







L Wo En (inn in a$ 

for JL roarams 

— V aTalodS 
and J \ )aaazmcs — 



TL« 

ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



^. 



Thomas & Thompson Co. 

The Downtown 
Prescription Drug Store 

Hove Your Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded by 

PERSCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

at Baltimore and Light Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

— Deliver]/ Service — 

TELEPHONE 

SAratoga 7-2960 



HOSPITAL 
EQUIPMENT 

THE 

COLSON-MERRIAM 

COMPANY 

MUlberry 5-2847 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



Russell W. Smith 

Genera/ Insurance 

ROOM 1100 
501 St. Paul St. 
Boltimore 1 Md 
LExington 9-0020 



42 



I HI-: M \RYI \N I) M AC.AZI N 1 



During the past year, the University 
oi Maryland has supplied ten southern 
universities with administrative heads 
and instructors in psychiatric nursing. 
They are: Doris Chaves, University ol 
Mississippi; Beazie Hayes, Emorj Uni- 
versity; Betty Hughie. University of 
Cieorgia; Betty Sue Johnson, Duke Uni- 
versity Carol Lowry, University of Vir- 
ginia; Mary J. Ludwig, Northwestern 
State College of Louisiana; (Catherine 
Lutes, University of Tennessee; Ella 
McCall. Duke University; Ciracia Som- 
erville. University of North Carolina; 
Caroline Saunders, Vanderbilt Univer- 
sitv. 



Student Government Ele< is 

The Student Government Association 
of the School of Nursing installed its 
newly elected officers recently. 

Those installed were: Suzanne Theis. 
President; Ruth Kanow, First Vice- 
President; Janet Carter, Second Vice- 
President; Jane Hoffman, Third Vice- 
President; Elaine Garrett, House Chair- 
man; Lynn Dyer, Secretary; and Stepha- 
nie Smith. Treasurer. 

Miss M. Margaret Jameson, Associate 
Dean of Women, and Miss Virginia 
Conley. chairman of the Nursing 
School's baccalaureate program, ad- 
dressed the students. Mrs. Alice Beegan, 
instructor in maternal and child health, 
will serve as adviser to the association 
for the coming term. 



Faculty Appointments 

Appointment of eight new instructors 
to the faculty of the School of Nursing 
was announced recently by Dr. Florence 
M. Gipe, Dean of the School. 

Four of the new faculty members are 
instructors in psychiatric nursing; Har- 
riet H. Bond, M.S., University of Mary- 
land; Ann M. Cain, M.S., University of 
Colorado and former instructor at that 
University; Mary Jane Carroll, M.S., 
University of Maryland; and Shirley S. 
Hale, M.S., University of Maryland. 

Two of the new instructors will teach 
medical and surgical nursing: Virginia 
Mulherin, M.S., New York University 
and former instructor at Villa Nova 
University, Philadelphia; and Lillie M. 
Largey, M.S., University of Maryland. 

Patricia Orem, M.S., University of 
Maryland, will teach nursing of children 
and Ann C. Bullock, M.Ed., Goucher 
College, will teach elementary education 
for long term illness. 

(Continued on next page) 



LUMBER 
• MILL WORK 
• BUILDER'S 
• PITTSBURGH 



II ARDW ARE 
PAINTS 



"Silver Spring's First Lumber Yard" 




SILVER ^f SPRING 
BUILDING SUPPLY CO 



8226 GEORGIA AVENUE AT RIPLEY ST. 
JUniper 9-2300 SILVER SPRING, MD. 



McLeod & Romberg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

— •— 

CUT STONE 

— •— 
Bladensburg, Maryland 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SUGRUE — PRES. 



NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY. Inc. 



SALES 



\Mypd 



SERVICE 



8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. 



COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



WINDOW • ON - THE • KITCHEN 

KUcltetenia 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food ... All our desserts are 
home-made popular prices 

no tipping . . . air conditioned 

BREAKFAST • LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee Sc a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 

Uth Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 

11th & E Sts., N.W. Washington, DC. 



s 


llltl IX. 
PROCESS 




BOOKBINDING 


Every 


Type For Every Purpose 


A Com 


plete Printers Finishing Service 




9401 Baltimore Blvd. 




WE 5-6884 




COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



January - February, 1960 



43 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 








PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



We 
DEVELOP LAND 

for 

its 
HIGHEST, BEST 

and most 
PROFITABLE USE 

for 
LAND OWNERS 

and 
INVESTORS 

HARRY A. BOSWELL CO., 

Inc. 

REALTORS 
3718 Rhode Island Avenue 

MT. RAINIER, MO. 
AP. Mill 



Jfuller & b'aibert 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 
Since 1920 



Phone — Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Alumni Association 
School of PHARMA( \ 
University of Maryland 



li oln i ( 'ole, ( hairman 
Publications C ommittee 



Aw i W I koi K 

I he tbirteentfa annual frolic of the 

Alumni Association ot the School of 
Pharmacy, University ot Mars land, was 
held at the Straus Auditorium. Park 
Heights and Slade Avenues. Baltimore, 
on November 5. 1959. 

The audience, a happy, informal and 
friendly group, numbering approximate- 
ly 500 persons, included students, their 
parents and friends, (acuity members. 
members of the sororities, fraternities 
and interested alumni. 

The entertainment consisted of eleven 
skits by the students. Dr. Frank J. Sla- 
ma, Executive Secretary, and Robert J. 
Kokoski. both teachers in the School of 
Pharmacy, supervised the presentation 
of the skits. 

President Victor H. Morgenroth wel- 
comed the guests and awarded the priz- 
es. Irving I. Cohen. First Vice-President. 
was Master of Ceremonies. 

Dean Noel E. Foss was presented and 
expressed appreciation of the work of 
the Alumni Association. 

The following captured the prizes: 

Phi Sigma Delta Fraternity — First 
Cash Prize and the Bernard Cherry 
Cup, presented by him personally, for 
one year, together with a token cup for 
the fraternity. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity — Sec- 
ond Cash Prize. 

Phi Delta Chi Fraternity — Third 
Cash Prize. 

Miss Arlene Asbell. piano solo — First 
(ash Prize for special presentation. 

The Sappfield Sisters. Misses Carolyn 
YVarfield and Nancy Sappe — Second 
Cash Prize for special presentation. 

The judges selecting the recipients of 
the prizes were: Samuel Portney. Nor- 
man J. Levin and Francis S. Balassone. 
past presidents of the Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

The Alumni Recruitment Students 
Committee. Mr. Nelson H. Warfield, 
Chairman, presented a short film, which 
is being shown to prospective pharmacy 
students bv this committee. 

Music during the presentation oi the 
skits was furnished bv a group from the 
School o\ Pharmacy. The "Men of 
Note Orchestra"" played for the dancing 
from 10:30 to 12:30. 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park. Md. 




A l ii in ni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



TEL Pc*k SiLe* 



8010 - 13th Street 

SILVER SPRINT,. MI). 

JU 8-4400 




?0 Minutes From Downtown Washington 

• COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

• TELEVISION & TELEPHONE ALL ROOMS 

• ROOM & VALET SERVICE 
. RECREATION ROOM 

. WASHER & DRYER FACILITIES 
. KITCHENETTES 

• 100 PER CENT PARKING 

CIRCULATING ICE WATER 

SIGHTSEEING TOURS ARRANGED 
REASONABLE RATES 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 

"DRIVE THRU- 
LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

Where You Save Up to 20°o 

Drive In 

Hand in Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Blodensburg Road, N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 
(Across from Sears-Roebuck) 



44 



i hi Maryland Magazini 



Refreshments were served bj the 
Place and Refreshments Committee, 
Sam A. Goldstein, Chairman, ablj as 
sisted In Mrs Goldstein, leil Rockman, 
Jerome Stiffman and others. | he re- 
freshments are always popular with the 
students and their friends. \n abundant 
quantity ol ice cream was provided bj 
the Hendler Ice Cream Company. Cook- 
ies were provided by the Austin Baking 
Company. Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, hot 
dogs, doughnuts and eider were also 
served. 

Door prizes, in quantit) and quality, 
were provided h\ the Calvert Drug Co.. 
Loewj Drug Company, H. B. Gilpin 
Company, Muth Brothers. Allen & Son 
Candy, and the I. & L. Candy and To- 
bacco Company. Students, in particular, 
are pleased when they are the recipients 
ol door prizes. 

The following members of the Alum- 
ni Association assisted with the regis- 
tration of the guests as they entered the 
hall, and with the distribution of prizes: 
Milton A. Friedman. Alexander M. 
Mayer. Solomon Wiener, James P. 
Cragg. Morris Rockman and others. 

One prize, or rather an appreciation 
gift, was bestowed upon Dr. Frank. J. 
Slama. for his painstaking planning of 
the program presented. He responded in 
his own inimitable way. 

The annual fall frolics are sponsored 
by the Alumni Association and their 
donating friends, and furnish a bright 
evening of entertainment for the stu- 
dents and alumni. 

The Valentine Dance of the Alumni 
Association is scheduled for Thursday, 
February 11,1 960, at the Emerson Ho- 
tel. James P. Cragg, Chairman, and 
Milton A. Friedman, Co-Chairman, are 
planning for the solicitation of adver- 
tisements and articles of interest for the 
Souvenir Program of February 11, 1960. 



Scholarships 

The Student Aid and Scholarship Com- 
mittee of the Alumni Association, 
Samuel I. Raichlen, Chairman, selected 
the following as recipients of freshmen 
scholarships in the School of Pharmacy 
for 1959-60: 

Alan J. Arenson, Sanford E. Bias, 
Yale N. Caplan, Thomas H. Keller, Jr., 
John E. Meyers, Gerald Rachanow and 
Leon Shargel. These scholarships are 
provided by the Alumni Association, the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
and the Read Drug Stores Foundation, 

(Continued on next page) 



Moving with Care, Everywhere 
by Land \ by Sea \ by Air 



lod— t> 



DRVIDSOrV 

TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. 



• Pre-Planned Moving to take many details off your hands 

• Nation-Wide and World-Wide Service thru United Van Lines 

• Sanitized Vans, protected against germs, insects, odors 

• Saf-T-Palc, cleanest, safest method for fragile goods 

• Palletized Storage, each lot in clean, mobile containers 
BALTIMORE • BRoadway 6-7900 WASHINGTON • LAwrence 9-2700 



WILLIAMS 




CONSTRUCTION 




COMPANY 




INC. 




General Contractors 




Highways — Airports 




Phone MUrdock 


BALTIMORE, 


6-1000 


MD. 



For advertising in Maryland Magazine 

call Baltimore . . . 

HOpkins 7-9018 



Hendlers 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



VISIT 

Bernie Lee's 

PENN HOTEL 

(Newly renovated) 

OPEN DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 a.m. 
serving 

BREAKFAST 

LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

5 — Spacious Banquet Rooms 
Call VA 3-0300 for reservation 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
PACKAGE GOODS 

15 W. Perm. Avenue 
TOWSON, MARYLAND 

FREE PARKING 



January - February, 1960 



45 




Save at the Btrong insured 
Perpetual by using the 
popular "aave-by-mail" 
plan. Customers from 
every State in the Union 
and from 11 foreign coun- 
tries. Excellent dividends 
paid quarterly. Write for 
free postage paid enve- 
lopes and forms. 

PERPETUAL 

lluilding AttHociatiun 

WASHINGTON, 4 D.C. 




nam 

ASSETS ""^ 
$300 MILLION 



Ottenberg s Bakers. 

Inc. 

Quality Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 
INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



r- 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Druggist 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Inc., and include tuition, fees, text- 
books und equipment not to exceed 
S500.00 lor the academic year. The re- 
cipients are selected on the basis ot 
worthiness) scholastic achievement and 
the need of financial as^stance. 

( hairman Samuel I. Raichlen and 
Mrs. Raichlen entertained the group, to- 
gether with members of the committee. 
ai their home on September 20, 1 M 5 ( > . 

I he following were the recipients of 
the Pharmacy Alumni Association 
scholarships for 1958-59 from the an- 
nual donation of $400.00 provided by 
the Association to match a correspond- 
ing amount for scholarships from the 
American Foundation for Pharmaceuti- 
cal Education. 

The recipients for the first semester 
of 1 959-60 scholarships from the Phar- 
macy Alumni Association are Ronald 
Goldner and Robert Kantorski. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College of Special and 
Continuation Studies) 

G. Allen Soger 



Mr. Carr Appointed 
Director of University Fund 

Mr. Joseph S. Carr. a University Col- 
lege graduate, is Director of the Greater 
University of Maryland Fund. 

Mr. Carr completed the Bachelor of 
Arts degree in General Studies with a 
primary concentration in commerce 
after having studied both on the campus 
and in the overseas program. 

While in the Air Force, T/Sgt. Carr. 
an Air Transportation Supervisor, en- 
rolled in his first University of Mary- 
land course in 1953 at the Wiesbaden. 
Germany, education center. In two 
years of duty at Wiesbaden, Sergeant 
Carr accumulated 38 semester hours of 
college work. He also commuted to 
classes at Rhein-Main. 

After obtaining his discharge in Jan- 
uary, 1956, Mr. Carr came to the cam- 
pus and completed the degree by Jan- 
uary, 1958. While on the campus, he 
was initiated into Delta Sigma Pi. the 
professional business fraternity, and he 
served as President of the Maryland 
chapter during his last semester. 

After graduation. Mr. Carr worked 
for several months in the field of life 
insurance. He joined the University's 
Office of Endowment in November of 
1958. 



Clifton D. Mayhew, 
Inc. 

Painting & Decorating 
Contractors 



#*£*? 




3436 Lee Highway 
JAckson 5-6131 

Arlington, Va. 









PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



Murray Hardware Co. 

Your Hardware Department 
Store 

Open Daily 9 to 9 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

UNIVERSITY BLVD. and 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 

LANGLEY PARK, MD. 

HEmlock 4-3000 



46 



the Maryland Magazine 



I Ik- Greater University of Maryland 
l und is the annual giving program for 
l Diversity Alumni. 

As Director of the Fund, Mr. Carr's 
duties include the recruiting, training, 
and coordinating of the activities of the 
Fund Workers. \ general canvass oi 
(3,000 Maryland alumni is held an- 
nually, and last year more than I.50D 
volunteers participated in the effort. 
I his year approximately 2.500 will be 
needed. 

Established in January, 1958, the 
Fund has already several major accom- 
plishments. More than $24,000 has been 
turned over for student scholarships. 
Over $100,000 has been devoted to fur- 
nishing the Baltimore Union-Dormitory. 
I acuity development and special re- 
search projects amount to more than 
$50,000. In its first 18 months, the Fund 
has raised more than $189,000. 

Mr. Carr is married, has one son, and 
lives in College Park. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Births 

To Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Kessler a 
daughter, Karen Gail, on November 14, 
1959. Mrs. Kessler, the former Linda 
Mae Jelinek, H.Ec. '55, is Secretary of 
the Montgomery County Alumni Chap- 
ter. The Kesslers also have another 
daughter, Geri Lynn, 2Vi years old. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Fred Martin, Jr., 
a daughter, Mary Patricia. Mrs. Martin 
is the former Mary Pat Cobey, A. & S. 
'58, the third generation of the Cobey 
family to graduate from Maryland. Her 
grandfather was W. C. Cobey, '01, and 
her father is the present Director of Ath- 
letics. W. W. Cobey, Jr.. A. & S. '30. 



George W. Cairnes 

Mr. George Wilson Cairnes, Eng. '03, 
died October 28, 1959. in Baltimore, of 
a heart attack. 



Dr. Clyde Hemphill 

Dr. Clyde Hemphill. M.D. 13, died re- 
cently. He is survived by his wife, who 
is presently residing in Black Mountain, 
North Carolina. 



OJUUkinA 

1 coff 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



E. S. ADKINS i 


66 ... 
everything 

needed 

tor 

building 99 


Phone PI 9-3171 
Salisbury, Md. 



PLANTATION 



ANGUS BULLS 

IMPORTERS - EXPORTERS - 
BREEDERS, of 
Scotch, and Irish Aberdeen-Angus 
Performance Attested Bulls for Sale 
Request Folder, Data Sheets, Prices 
Address: James B. Lingle, Manager 

(Telephone: TAylor 7-2041) 



WYE PLANTATION, Queenstown,Md. 



PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



THE 

NATIONAL BANK 
OF CAMBRIDGE 

Complete 
Banking Service 

Organized 1880 

SAFETY DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

Cambridge, Maryland 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



TELEPHONE PI 9-5594 
ninmimiinni 



SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



January - February, 1960 



47 



I ) i rec tory ( > I A d ve rtise rs 



47 

1 

| i 

■I 
Am..! 
Ann. 
Ah in I Aubil . I ■ 

Baltimore Asphalt Bio 

<ii~ 
Ball ii I lope • ompan) 

ml. I 22 

Bank ..i Maryland 

,\ Ro - Hard* ■ ' orapai i 
Bard ■ 

inn's Laundr) 

Bi il.. ida « .n.l.i Block M I I 

B 
Bon 1 l ( 'hip 1 )i-i 31 

A. Boswell ' ompan) 44 

I 'In. 9 

\|. at IV, dm t ( i 
1 1. pcti i I l!i i.tii. Inc. 19 

pan) -'I 

any 
Thorn son 40 

29 
I ) II. ii i > i hamtx ■ ■ ■ ins 31 

l ■ ' ' ■ 33 

Thomas E. Clark, Inc 

rj 18 

Cohn \ Bock < 'ompanj 

\liii i. mi ( ompan) 
Elizabeth Coone] 
County Title Company, Inc. 

\ M ■ Cowi II, Im 41 

.*. Blackwell Compan) 31 

Oil -\ Wax i ompan) 
8 Sons 

Compan) 4 5 

F. A. Da vi s & S .25 

l< I Inc. 41 

A int. douse Moti I 
I II DeVeau A Sons, Inc. 37 

Dietrich \ Gambrill, li 
Diplomat Motel 21 

i ■ 
Di umi ipan) . I ni 

Knil. 

1 r, I 

(ion 



.1 II I 

Ltd 
Frankl 

llbi I Inc. 

Albi ii I < . 

M I Grovi Limi 

I . ■ II I . . I'.ii M Adami 

.' 

Hotel 

Dairy, Im 

I I ai \> 1 1 -i ii .nit 
Hendler' I I 1 1 y 
Hilkrest Florist 

Robert I Hoff, Inc. 

Hotel Dupont Plaza 

llniiii Shinn Optical Company 



I ndustrial ( 'orporatii in 

Johnston, Lemon & Company 
Optician 

n Key Hot< I 
Kidwell & Kidwi II, I iu . 
Kiua Bros., Inc.. Printing 
The E. II. ECoester Baker) Compan) 

J I .angrall 8 Bro., ti 

ssei Compan) 

• Hotel 
John I >. I. m as Pi inting • ompan) 
Lustin-Nicholson < lic\ rolet 
Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 



38 

. 

44 



41 



21 



19 



G M M ai Ice i !oi p. 

any, Inc. 
Maria's R< staurant 
Maryland Hotel SuppI) Company 
i liftor I ) Ma) hi n tn 

olitan Toui ists 
Miller & Long 
I-', O. Mitchell & Bro., Inc. 
Modi i ii Machinist Company 
Modi rn Si Company 

Motel Park Silvei 
Mui ra) Baumgai tner 
Mui ra) II..- •!« ..i . i ompan) 



38 
34 
30 

34 
18 

35 
41 

41 



J 4 

42 

97 
40 
36 
21 



Mel eod 8 Ri imb , Inc 

Mi \. ill Sui VI j -. Inc. 



37 



bridge 
rp. 
nal Equipmi nl & Suppl) Co. 
Non ny 

rant 



Inn 

I'll . 

Palmei Ford 

I moan) 

II.. i. ! II,. 
tual Buildii . 

I< l: 

I'm Man ( ' pri irp. 

Quit i dry 

Reft ' 

Ki I i 'I ni, 

' .1 House 

Salisbury Milling Company 

\ an R 

Schluderberg Kurdle Compi 

Shade Shop 

Slew Boat R< staurant 

\ Gravel I 
Silver Spring Building Suppl) Co., Inc. 
A II. Sinn 

Russell \V. Smith. Insurance 
Smith's Bool 5l 
Southcomb, Inc. 
Southeast Title Corp. 
Southern Plate I 
Spring Hill Sanitarium 
i 

Sterling Process, Bookbinders 

Student's Suppl. 5l 
Suburban Trust Company 
.Man.. Swartz, Furs 
theart liaki • - 

Thomas & Thompson I 
Thompson Furniture i 
Thoni - 

Town Hall Tavern 
The Tuu n House 

Univers 

Wallop & Son, 1 

Walton and Madden 

Wasl It ttling \\ orks 

Washington Wl . Inc. 

J. I. Wi Us Compan) . Inc. 

Western Extern Inc. 

Westinghouse Electric I 

sale Kadi. Parts ' Inc. 
Wilkii 

1 1 \\ ilkil - 
Williams Construction ' 
J. McKenn) Willis 
\\ m Plantation 

Duke Zeibi it's Ri 



46 
4.' 






21 
43 

42 
36 

32 

39 

44 
40 



21 



19 



47 
40 

40 



4S 



thy Maryland Magazine 



1960 




WRESTLING 

NATIONAL 

COLLEGIA TE 

WRESTLING 

CHAMPIONSHIPS 

March 24, 25, 26 

Cole Activities Building— University of Maryland 

See the Nation's Top Collegiate Wrestlers in a 
3-day Meet. 

Oklahoma State, Oklahoma, Iowa State, Pittsburgh, 
Wyoming, Lehigh, Cornell, Michigan State, our own 
Terps, and many others from across the nation. 

(order tickets now) 



Reserved Seats 
Single Seats 



— 6 sessions (3 days) $8.00 

— Quarter-Finals & Semi-Fin. 2.00 ea. 

—Finals 2.50 

Unreserved Seats — 6 Sessions 6.00 

— Quarter-Finals & Semi-Fin. 1.00 ea. 

—Finals 2.00 

Add 25c to order for Insurance and Postage 



Sept. 24 

Oct. 1 

Oct. 1 5 

Oct. 29 



Add 25c 



Sept. 17 
Oct. 8 
Oct. 22 

Nov. 5 
Nov. 12 
Nov. 19 



FOOTBALL 

HOME GAMES 

Texas (Cotton Bowl 1960) 

Duke (Band Day) 

Clemson (Blue Bonnet Bowl 1960) 

(Parents' Day) 
South Carolina (Homecoming) 

For choice seats order season tickets 

Season Tickets — $16.00 

to order for Insurance and Postage 

AWAY GAMES 

West Virginia Morgantown, W. Va. 

North Carolina State Raleigh, N. C. 

Wake Forest Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Penn State University Park, Pa. 

North Carolina Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Virginia Charlottesville, Va. 




WASHINGTONS NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 




HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA 



COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 



Meeting and Banquet Facilities 



DUPONT CIRCLE 
HUDson 3-6000 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 
John J. Cost, Gen. Mgr. 



ALVIN-L-AUBINOEInc 



Build 



er 



19th Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone : 
HUdson 3-6025 



Vlumni Publication of the University of Maryland 




magazine 







VolumeXXXI Number Three • March -April 1960 



mversity Education and Modern Conditions • Noble Experiment of the Lords Baltimore 



Speaking of Progress - - - 




Progr< ss speaks for itself. 
57,000 members can't be wrong! 




The 

NEW 

SITE 

For 

SAVERS 



Dividends compounded and paid quarterly 






TIieM 



RSTlUmERAL 

imW / ashi>tgtox 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN 
ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

Bethesda Branch: 8216 Wisconsin Avenue 
OL. 6-3923 



— Home Office — 

610 13th Street, N.W. Washington 5, D. C. 

Dl. 7-2370 



M;ii\vliin< ' 




The Covers rhe art illustrating the covei <>t this issue <>i rhe Maryland 
Magazine was rendered by Mr. Mitchell Jamieson, national!) known .misi and 
a new member of the Fine Arts faculty, Mr. Jamieson'a illustration symbolizes 
the main points of the article hy Bertrand Russell beginning on page s 



the 




magazine 

Volume XXXI 

Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

ID OF RE GENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK.r.Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE, Assistant Treasurer 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

C. EWINGTUTTLE 
WILLIAM C.WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



Number 3 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE O F UNIVERSITY R ELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DAN EGG ER, Staff Photographer 



OFF I CE OF FINANCE AND B USI NESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



MARCH APRIL • 1960 



OFFJCERSJ5F T HE ALUMN I ASSOCI ATION 

HARRY A. BOSWELL JR., '42 President 

MRS. ELIZABETH ROHR SINGLETON, '47, Vice-President 

DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-Preoidor* 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 

ADVERTISING DIRECT OR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N. W. 
Baltimore 18 Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-901 8) (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue 



: 



FEATURES 

2 
3 
5 
8 

12 
14 
15 
16 
18 

NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

18 
21 

30 
31 
37 
38 
41 
42 
44 
46 
48 

51 



The Alumni Diary 

Alumni and Campus Notes 

University Education and Modern Conditions 

The Future of the University 

That Noble Experiment of the Lords Baltimore 

Do You Remember? 

Alumni-University Liaison Advisory Committee 

Alumni Celebrate Charter Day 

Maryland Books and Authors 

Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Dentistry 

Education 

Engineering 

Law 

Medicine 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

University College 



Social Notes 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of Mar 



1 111 Geni kal Alumni Council 

s< HOOl i VD COLLI t.i 

ki rid s/ n / 1/ M 1 s 

K I . K I I I I l> K I 

Paul M Galbreath, "39 

Aiiliui H II. million, '29 

< layton Reynolds, '22 

lETI A SCIENCES 

W Gilberl Dent, Jr., '26 
( harlcs I l llinger, '37 
l)i Reginald V. limit. "14 

BUSINESS 4 CUB LI I ADMINISTRATION 

II., m \ Boswell, Jr., '-42 
Ralph w. l rey, lr., '41 
( hestei w. I awney, '3 l 

III N I U I III 

Dr. Samuel Bryant, '32 

l)i 1 1. ii i \ I evin, '26 
Dr. I ugene D I von, '38 

EDUCATION 

(, Watson Algire, "30 
Clara Dixon. '34 
Harry Hasslinger, '33 

I M,IM I KING 

l mmetl I oane, '29 
Dudley D, Taylor, '51 
Arthur G. VanReuth, '34 

il(i m i: BCO NOMICS 

Mrs. Miriam Beall, '3 I 
Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 
Mrs. Agnes McNutt Kricker, '31 

I A W 

Mary Arabian, '44 
I ay man I, Redden, '34 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

Ml BICIN1 

Dr. I Illusion R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel I Pessagno, '20 

Dr. William II. Iriplett. 'I I 

IS 1 1 II s I N O 

Mis. Dorothy K. Herbert, '24 

Mrs. Norma S. I ong, '49 

Mis Elizabeth R. Singleton, '47 

PHARMACY 

1 1\ man Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank I. Slama, '24 



i:x orricto members: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President oj the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-! reasurer 
Victor Holm. '57, Ass't Secretary 
I rank Block, '24, Past President 
Joseph II. Deckman, '31, Past President 
I Gilberl Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J Homer kemsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert 1Z. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
I". I. Speer, '17, Past President 
( V. Koons, '29. Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Hell, '19, Past President 



ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES 
Baltimore — David W. Bien, '29 

( ai loll ( otinly — 

Dr. Lawrence I. Leggett, '30 
( ecil Count) I rancis X Chapman, '50 
( umberland -Retard Aldridge, '25 
I astet a Shore Otis I w illey, '21 
I icdei ick ( lounty — 

lames I . /immei man. '37 

M" (luh -George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery C ounty — 

Roberl W. Beall, "^l 
New England George Kerlejza, '25 
New York Harold McGay, '50 
Noi ih Eastern Shore — 

Roberl W. Downes Jr., '46 
Overseas Col. Ralph I Williams. '33, '41 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Pi ince ( leoi ues ( !ounty — 

l gberl I . Tingley, '27 
Richmond Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectadj Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
I ei rapin lames w Stevens, 'l'» 
t s Dept. oi Agriculture — 

William II Evans, "26 
Washington County — 

Harry F. Vollmer, III. '40 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



TOMORROW is HISTORi . . . I his subject, recently chosen by a speaker to portray 
the role of education, combined with a most successful University of Mary- 
land Charter Day celebration, set us to thinking. We were enjoying the flush of 
another anniversary celebration sponsored by the Alumni Club of Baltimore. This 
activity, which brought credit not only to the Club but also to the Alumni Asso- 
ciation and the University, recalled the proud history of our institution, the con- 
structive and progressive present and the dreams of a brilliant future. 

We realized how swiftly time was passing. Even as the curtain rang down 
on Charter Day, 1960. attention was focused on a number of alumni club tunc 
tions and, more especially, on preparations for Spring Reunions of our anniversary 
classes and other alumni. The date of May 7, 1960 went on the calendar for the 
Alumni-Varsity football game and for Reunions for a number of our classes. 

Rather quickly, our attention strayed from dates and details to hesitate again 
on the phrase, "Tomorrow is History." Why tomorrow, when there are so many 
problems to meet today? There is the almost inconceivable predicted increase in 
population. . . . Three-fourths of the world's population has hardly known a day 
without hunger. . . . Peace in our time is a greater problem than the penetration 
of outer space. . . . Two great societies struggle for prestige and position. 

Through many generations the responsibility of colleges and universities has 
been to provide opportunity for the pursuit of truth and encouragement for the 
inquiring mind. The true educator accepts both the responsibility and privilege of 
sharing with others the good ideas which have been entrusted to him. It is he who 
knows the handyman as one who works with his hands, the craftsman as one 
who takes advantage of both the head and the hands, and the artist as one who 
combines art, head and hands. Undoubtedly, he understands that. "Tomorrow is 
History." 

The alumnus, as a student, was made aware of an ever-changing pattern. He 
recognizes that we stand on the turbulent shores of changing time and that we 
have great responsibility in this world-wide matter of understanding and of being 
understood. He knows that we have sometimes become absorbed with oursehes 
to the degree that we have lost our ability to communicate with others. A pause 
in the headlong dash to accomplish will enable the educated to see that we have 
power not only for survival but also for some semblance of heaven-on-earth. An 
article on the excellence of dogwood in the manufacture of textiles stated. "A 
wood thus used must not crack under continuous impact. It must wear smoothly 
and not roughen, lest it fret the warp." 

Alumni who have had an opportunity to see education in its search for solu- 
tions to the problems of mankind are willing to give something of themselves 
to help maintain a sense of balance in society and to bring sanity to the world. 
They cannot now forecast what the next decade may bring but each is certain 
that education is vital to the future. How well they know that yreat universities 
have endured while kingdoms have fallen, governments have changed and wars 
have been won and lost. To the alumnus, the University has purpose, for it stands 
in the forefront of world understanding and progress. Opportunities for present 
and future citizens in education will determine the civilization of tomorrow. Cap- 
tured or wasted. "Tomorrow is History." 

As ever, 



Ai 



f a**—^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



FEBRUARY 
29- 

Ma\ 2 Space Education Institute — Svmons 
Hall, College Park. 

MARCH 
25 Maryland Day. 

29- 
May 17 Business Management Institute — 
Chemistry Building. College Park. 

30- 
May 18 Business Management Institute — 
Health Sciences Library, Baltimore. 

3 1 National Symphony Orchestra and 
Washington Ballet — College Park. 



APRII 

1,2 



Maryland Home Economics Asso- 
ciation meeting — College Park. 

12 "Carmen" (Presented by Grass 
Roots Opera Company) — Cole Ac- 
tivities Building, 8:30 p.m. 

14 Easter recess begins after last class 
— College Park and Baltimore. 

19 Easter recess ends, 8 a.m. — College 
Park and Baltimore. 

25-27 3rd Annual Highway Maintenance 
Institute — Student Union, College 
Park. 

26-30 University Theatre Production, 
"The Pajama Game" — College 
Park. 

30 State Convention of Future Home 
Makers of America — College Park. 



MAY 

3-7 University Theatre Production 
"The Pajama Game" — College 
Park. 
19 Honors Day — College of Engineer- 
ing, College Park. 

JUNE 

2 Alumni Day — School of Medicine. 

Baltimore. 
4 Commencement Exercises. 
22-24 4th Annual Adult Education Insti- 
tute—Student Union, College Park. 

27 Registration for the Summer Ses- 
sion — College Park. 

28 Summer Session begins — College 
Park. 




MEETING OF RHODE ISLAND SECTION of 

Dental Alumni finds at the head table the 
following, seated from left to right: Mr. 
Joseph Carr, Director of the Greater Uni- 
versity of Maryland Fund; Joseph Cap- 
puccio, '46; Edward Morin '20; and stand- 



ing left to right: Henry A. Martin '05; 
James F. Colgan, President of the Tufts 
Dental Alumni Association; William Dece- 
sare, '36; and Eric Waxberg, '19. (See 
School of Dentistry section for story.) 



Sons of Former President Have 
Distinguished Careers 

"The University of Maryland will al- 
ways be near and dear to our hearts 

So ends a letter written to the editor 
of The Maryland Magazine. The letter 
came from Winton D. Woods of Bloom- 
ington, Indiana, who is the son of Dr. 
A. F. Woods, President of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland from 1917 to 1926. 

Mr. Woods grew up in College Park 
where he met and married Nancy 
Norment, an honor graduate of the 1936 
graduating class. They left College Park 
during the war years of the 40's when 
Mr. Woods was serving as Chief of the 
Legal Division of the Ordnance Depart- 
ment, Ammunition Branch. U. S. Army. 
From 1945 to 1952 he was attorney 
for Monsanto Chemical Company in 
St. Louis. From 1952 to 1959 he was 
house counsel and assistant secretary 

(Continued on next page) 



March- April, 1960 



i'! Sarkes rarzian, Inc., in Bloomington. 
He is nov* I xecutive Vice President and 
Genera] Manager ol the G. B. Wood- 
ward insurance ( ompanj . 

Mr. Woods' brother, Dr. Mark W 
Woods. Ag. '31, was lor many \cars 

a member ol the faculty at the Univer- 
sity Ol Maryland. Dr. Woods and his 
wife (the former Vera I.. Klein, II I c. 
'32) reside in H\altsville. Dr. Woods is 

presently engaged in cancer research al 

the National Institutes of Health in 
Bethesda. 



Roberi James Assumes Air Force 
\i ademy Duty 

Mr. Robert C. James, formerly the As- 
sociate Dean of Men at the University 
of Maryland, was recently selected as 
the Assistant Director of Intercollegiate 
Athletics at the Air Force Academy. 

Mr. James is responsible for the busi- 
ness management affairs of the Intercol- 
legiate Athletic Department. He is a 
1947 graduate of the University of 
Maryland. During his undergraduate 
days he was a four-sport letterman, foot- 
ball, basketball, track, lacrosse, and has 
been associated with the University since 
graduation. 

Mr. James is a Major in the United 
States Air Force Reserve and is a vet- 
eran of World War II. He reported for 
duty at the Air Force Academy the first 
of February. He is married and has 
two daughters. 

Fellowships for American Women 

Maryland alumnae with advanced de- 
grees should be aware of fellowships 
now being announced by the Education- 
al Foundation of the American Asso- 
ciation of University Women. 

Women holding a doctor's degree; or 
who will have fulfilled all the require- 
ments for the doctorate, except the 
dissertation, by the time the fellowship 
year begins; or who have attained pro- 
fessional recognition are eligible to 
apply for these fellowships. One will 
have a value o\ $5,000; four will be 
offered of $4,000 apiece; ten will be 
worth $3,000; and 25 will be valued at 
$2,000-$2,500. There are no restrictions 
as to the age or the field of the applicant 
and a fellowship may be used cither in 
the United States or abroad. 

Interested alumnae please write to: 

Fellowships Ollice 

AAUW Educational Foundation 

2401 Virginia Avenue, N. W. 

Washington 7. D. C. 
Application forms will be available 
August I. I960. 




Dr. Singer receives Jaycees award. 

Junior Chamber Names Dr. Singer 
Among Outstanding Ten 

National attention once again has fo- 
cused on Dr. S. Fred Singer. Associate 
Professor of Physics at the University 
of Maryland. 

Dr. Singer, who is 35, has been 
named by the Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce as one of the "Ten Outstanding 
Young Men of 1959." Recognized as 
one of the nation's foremost astro- 
physicists. Dr. Singer is consultant and 
head of the scientific evaluation group 
of the Congressional Committee on 
Astronautics and Space Exploration. He 
has been a leader in the design of small 
earth satellites and he led the first group 
to measure the earth's magnetic field 
100 miles up. 

Known internationally as well as na- 
tionally for his work, he recently 
attended a meeting of the Cosmic Ray 
Committee in Moscow, the IV Interna- 
tional Conference on Ionization Phe- 
nomena in Gases at Uppsala, Sweden. 
the Fifth Conference of the Interna- 
tional Commission for Optics at the 
Royal Institute of Technology in Stock- 
holm, and the Tenth ( ongress of the 
International Astronautical Federation 
in London. 



In Moscow, Dr. Singer presented a 
research paper entitled "Theory of 
Trapped Particles in the Earth's Mag- 
netic Field." He presented a paper en- 
titled "High Temperature Plasmas 
Trapped in the Earth's Magnetic Field." 
at the Uppsala conference. 



Man of the Year 

"Man of the Year in Service to Agricul- 
ture" describes young Dr. Gerald F. 
Combs. Professor of Poultry, who re- 
ceived that Award for 1959 this March. 

A pound of meat from a pound of 
feed: this goal has been luring poultry 
nutritionists for \ears. In flock tests. Dr. 
Combs has succeeded in producing a 
pound of broiler meat from 1.86 pounds 
of feed. Experts feel sure that he's the 
man most likely to achieve the goal if 
anyone ever does. 

Dr. Combs joined the University ol 
Maryland as Professor of Poultry Nutri- 
tion after receiving a Ph.D. degree from 
Cornell University in 1948. Although he 
has had some handsome offers from feed 
manufacturers in the 12 years he has 
been at Maryland. Dr. Combs has 
chosen to remain in college research 
work where his contributions can be 
made available to all broiler growers. 



the Maryland Magazine 



University Education 
and Modern Conditions 

By Bertrand Russell 




EDUCATION IS A VAST AND COMPLEX SUBJECT INVOLVING 
many problems of great difficulty. I propose, in what 
follows, to deal with only one of these problems, namely, the 
adaptation of university education to modern conditions. 

Universities are an institution of considerable antiquity. 
They developed during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries 
out of cathedral schools where scholastic theologians learned 
the art of dialectic. But, in fact, the aims which inspired 
universities go back to ancient times. 

One may say that Plato's Academy was the first university. 
Plato's Academy had certain well-marked objectives. It aimed 
at producing the sort of people who would be suitable to 
become Guardians in his ideal Republic. The education which 
Plato designed was not in his day what would now be called 
"cultural." A "cultural" education consists mainly in the learn- 
ing of Greek and Latin. But the Greeks had no need to learn 
Greek and no occasion to learn Latin. What Plato mainly 
wished his Academy to teach was, first, mathematics and 
astronomy, and, then, philosophy. The philosophy was to have 
a scientific inspiration with a tincture of Orphic mysticism. 

Something of this sort, in various modified forms, persisted 
in the West until the Fall of Rome. After some centuries, it was 
taken up by the Arabs and, from them, largely through the 
Jews, transmitted back to the West. In the West it still 
retained much of Plato's original political purpose, since it 
aimed at producing an educated elite with a more or less 
complete monopoly of political power. This aim persisted. 
virtually unchanged, until the latter half of the nineteenth 
century. From that time onwards, the aim has become increas- 
ingly modified by the intrusion of two new elements: democ- 
racy and science. The intrusion of democracy into academic 
practice and theory is much more profound than that of 
science, and much more difficult to combine with anything 
like the aims of Plato's Academv. 



* Copyright 1959, Editorial Projects for Education. Inc.. all 
rights reserved. 



March-April, 1960 



i mil a was seen that political democracy had become 
inevitable, universal education, which is run* taken for granted 
in all civilized countries, was vehemently opposed, on grounds 
which were broadly aristocratic. There had been ever since 
ancient tunes a very sharp line between the educated and the 
Uneducated the educated had had a severe training and had 
learnt much, while the uneducated could not read or write. 
I he educated, who hail a monopoly ol political power, dreaded 

the extension ol schools to the "lower classes." The President 

ol the Ko\al Society, in the year 1X07. considered that it 
would he disastrous il working men could read, since he 
feared that they would spend their time reading Tom Paine. 
When my grandfather established an elementary school in 
his parish, well-to-do neighbours were outraged, saying that 
he had destroyed the hitherto aristocratic character ol the 
neighbourhood. It was political democracy — at least, in Eng- 
land — that brought a change of opinion in this matter. 
Disraeli, after securing the vote for urban working men, 
favoured compulsory education with the phrase, "We must 
educate our masters." Education came to seem the right of 
all who desired it. But it was not easy to see how this right 
was to be extended to university education; nor, if it were, 
how universities could continue to perform their ancient 
functions. 

The reasons which have induced civilized countries to adopt 
universal education are various. There were enthusiasts for 
enlightenment who saw no limits to the good that could be 
done by instruction. Many of these were very influential in 
the early advocacy of compulsory education. Then there 
were practical men who realized that a modern State and 
modern processes of production and distribution cannot easily 
be managed if a large proportion of the population cannot 
read. A third group were those who advocated education 
as a democratic right. There was a fourth group, more silent 
and less open, which saw the possibilities of education from 
the point of view of official propaganda. The importance of 
education in this regard is very great. In the eighteenth cen- 
tury, most wars were unpopular; but. since men have been 
able to read the newspapers, almost all wars have been 
popular. This is only one instance of the hold on public 
opinion which Authority has acquired through education. 

Although universities were not directly concerned in these 
educational processes, they have been profoundly affected by 
them in ways which are, broadly speaking, inevitable, but 
which are. in part, very disturbing to those who wish to 
preserve what was good in older ideals. 

IT IS DIFFICULT TO SPEAK IN ADVOCACY OF OLDER IDEALS 
without using language that has a somewhat old-fashioned 
flavour. There is a distinction, which formerly received gen- 
eral recognition, between skill and wisdom. The growing com- 
plexities of technique have tended to blur this distinction, at 
any rate in certain regions. 




There are kinds ol skill which are not specifically respected 
although they are difficult to acquire. A contortionist. I am 
told, has to begin training in early childhood, and. when 
proficient, he possesses a very rare and difficult skill. But it 
is not felt that this skill is socially useful, and it is, therefore, 
not taught in schools or universities. A great many skills. 
howe\er, indeed a rapidly increasing number, are very vital 
elements in the wealth and power of a nation. Most of these 
skills are new and do not command the respect of ancient 
tradition. Some of them may be considered to minister to 
wisdom, but a great many certainly do not. 

But what, you will ask. do you mean by "wisdom*".' I am 
not prepared with a neat definition. But I will do my best to 
convey what I think the word is capable of meaning. It is a 
word concerned partly with knowledge and partly with feeling. 
It should denote a certain intimate union of knowledge with 
apprehension of human destiny and the purposes of life. 
It requires a certain breadth of vision, which is hardly possible 
without considerable knowledge. But it demands, also, a 
breadth of feeling, a certain kind of universality of sympathy. 

I think that higher education should do what is possible 
towards promoting not only knowledge, but wisdom. I do 
not think that this is easy; and I do not think that the aim 
should be too conscious, for, if it is. it becomes stereotyped 
and priggish. It should be something existing almost uncon- 
sciously in the teacher and conveyed almost unintentional!) 
to the pupil. I agree with Plato in thinking this the greatest 
thing that education can do. Unfortunately, it is one of the 
things most threatened by the intrusion of crude democratic 
shibboleths into our universities. 

The fanatic of democracy is apt to say that all men are 
equal. There is a sense in which this is true, but it is not a 
sense which much concerns the educator. What can be meant 
truly by the phrase "All men are equal" is that in certain 
respects they have equal rights and should have an equal 
share of basic political power. Murder is a crime whoeser the 
victim may be, and everybody should be protected against it 
by the law and the police. Any set of men or women which 
has no share in political power is pretty certain to suffer 
injustices of an indefensible sort. All men should be equal 
before the law. It is such principles which constitute what is 
valid in democracy. 

But this should not mean that we cannot recognize differing 
degrees of skill or merit in different individuals. Every teacher 
knows that some pupils are quick to learn and others are 
slow. Every teacher knows that some boys and girls are 
eager to acquire knowledge, while others have to be forced 
into the minimum demanded by Authority. When a group 
of young people are all taught together in one class, regard- 
less of their greater or less ability, the pace has to be too 
quick for the stupid and too slow for the clever. The amount 
of teaching that a young person needs depends to an enor- 
mous extent upon his ability and his tastes. A stupid child 
will only pay attention to what has to be learnt while the 
teacher is there to insist upon the subject-matter of the lesson 
A really clever young person, on the contrary, needs oppor- 
tunity and occasional guidance when he finds some difficulty 
momentarily insuperable. The practice o\ teaching clexer and 
stupid pupils together is extremely unfortunate, especially as 
regards the ablest of them. Infinite boredom settles upon these 
outstanding pupils while matters that they have lone 
understood are being explained to those who are backward. 

This evil is greater the greater the age o\ the student. By 
the time that an able young man is at a university, what he 
needs is occasional advice (not orders) as to what to read, 

the Maryland Magazine 




and an instructor who has time and sympathy to listen to 
his difficulties. The kind of instructor that I have in mind 
should be thoroughly competent in the subject in which the 
student is specializing, but he should be still young enough 
to remember the difficulties that are apt to be obstacles to 
the learner, and not yet so ossified as to be unable to discuss 
without dogmatism. Discussion is a very essential part in the 
education of the best students and requires an absence of 
authority if it is to be free and fruitful. I am thinking not 
only of discussion with teachers but of discussion among 
the students themselves. For such discussion, there should be 
leisure. And, indeed, leisure during student years is of the 
highest importance. When I was an undergraduate, I made 
a vow that, when in due course I became a lecturer, I would 
not think that lectures do any good as a method of instruc- 
tion, but only as an occasional stimulus. So far as the abler 
students are concerned, I still take this view. Lectures as a 
means of instruction are traditional in universities and were 
no doubt useful before the invention of printing, but since 
that time they have been out of date as regards the abler kind 
of students. 



IT IS, I AM PROFOUNDLY CONVINCED, A MISTAKE TO OBJECT 
on democratic grounds to the separation of abler from 
less able pupils in teaching. In matters that the public con- 
siders important no one dreams of such an application of 



supposed democracy. I verybody is willing to admit thai sunk 
athletes are better than others and thai movie stars deserve 
more honour than ordinary mortals, lh.it is because the) 
have a kind of skill which is much admired even by those who 
do not possess n. Bui mtclleetu.il ability, so i.n from being 
admired in stupid boss, is positively and actively despised; 
and even among grown-ups, the term "egg-head" is not 
expressive of respect. It h.is been ma- oi the humiliations ol 
the military authorities ol our time thai the man vJio now 
a days brings success m war is no longer a gentleman ol 
commanding aspect, sitting upright upon .1 prancing horse, 
but a wretched scientist whom every military-minded boy 
would have bullied throughout his youth. However, it is not 
for special skill in slaughter that I should wish to see the 
"egg-head" respected. 



THE NEEDS OF THE MODERN WOKII) HAVE BROUGII I A 
conflict, which I think could be avoided, between scientific 
objects and those that are called "cultural." The latter represent 
tradition and still have, in my country, a certain snobbish 
pre-eminence. Cultural ignorance, beyond a point, is despised. 
Scientific ignorance, however complete, is not. I do not think, 
myself, that the division between cultural and scientific educa- 
tion should be nearly as definite as it has tended to become. 
I think that every scientific student should have some knowl- 
edge of history and literature, and that every cultural student 
should have some acquaintance with some of the basic ideas 
of science. Some people will say that there is not time, during 
the university curriculum, to achieve this. But I think that 
opinion arises partly from unwillingness to adapt teaching to 
those who are not going to penetrate very far into the subject 
in question. More specifically, whatever cultural education is 
offered to scientific students should not involve a knowledge 
of Latin or Greek. And I think that whatever of science is 
offered to those who are not going to specialize in any scientific 
subject should deal partly with scientific history and partly 
with general aspects of scientific method. I think it is a 
good thing to invite occasional lectures from eminent men to 
be addressed to the general body of students and not only to 
those who specialize in the subject concerned. 

There are some things which I think it ought to be possible, 
though at present it is not, to take for granted in all who are 
engaged in university teaching. Such men or women must, 
of course, be proficient in some special skill. But, in addition 
to this, there is a general outlook which it is their duty to 
put before those whom they are instructing. They should 
exemplify the value of intellect and of the search for knowl- 
edge. They should make it clear that what at any time passes 
for knowledge may, in fact, be erroneous. They should incul- 
cate an undogmatic temper, a temper of continual search and 
not of comfortable certainty. They should try to create an 
awareness of the world as a whole, and not only of what is 
near in space and time. Through the recognition of the likeli- 
hood of error, they should make clear the importance of 
tolerance. They should remind the student that those whom 
posterity honours have very often been unpopular in their 
own day and that, on this ground, social courage is a virtue 
of supreme importance. Above all, every educator who is 
engaged in an attempt to make the best of the students to 
whom he speaks must regard himself as the servant of 
truth and not of this or that political or sectarian interest. 
Truth is a shining goddess, always veiled, always distant, 
never wholly approachable, but worthy of all the devotion of 
which the human spirit is capable. 



March-April, 1960 



The Future of the University 



by 
Albin O. Kuhn, Executive Vice President 




IN PROJECTING iiiE_TJJJURE OF THE UNIVERSITY ONE IS 
initially in ^--difficult position, for any projection of the 
future must be based primarily on the existing and the past. 
The University's future, by its very nature, cannot be pro- 
jected as an extension of past development, for the University 
kat any stage a dynamic expression of the negds that are 
rent. One who couW^accurately forecast thejiutur-e of the 
Jmvers#5r©T'~Maryland would in the^mrTanalysis be fore- 
tasting the future of the slat^aflttlhe nation. 

Advanced^gJjmjii»g--trnaprojection of future developments 

[ js j>L-gse<rt-"Tmportance to any organization, not because the 

projections can be expected to prove entirely accurate, but 



rather because the very act of looking ahead in a planned 
manner leads to organized thinking about the past, present, 
and future. Further, it forms the basis for improved plans as 
new opportunities arise. This article should be read uith these 
thoughtsjri mind. 

What is the University? It is the student body and the 
resulting alumni, the faculty, the staff, the library, and the 
various physical facilities. It is organized into colleges and 
schools that give direction to the teaching and learning, the 
research and publication, and the leadership and services that 
are offered. Any look at the future thus concerns these 
components. 



I 111 Si i di n i BODY and An mm 

Tiiu Student numbers \mII increase is ail entirely safe 
assumption, ["he doubling to tripling of enrollment that 
can be projected from the population ol less than college age 
in Maryland may be the mere beginning in enrollment expan- 
sion as compared to the generation that follows. 

[he enrollment ol foreign students and students from other 
areas ol the I nited States will continue to develop within the 
policj that their numbers shall not he less than 15 percent 
nor more than 20 percent ol the total. I his will insure that 
the diverse origins ol the student body will continue to bring 
to the campus a broad background ol experiences that will 
lead to interchange of information beneficial to all the students. 
I he i diversity ol Maryland attracts a student bod) ol 

widel) diversified preparation for college work, as is true in 
most st.ite universities. An important strength is thus gained 
in the preparation ol students for the many needs of a demo- 
cratic society. The heterogeneous nature of the student popu- 
lation can be expected to remain largely unchanged as the 
future unfolds, except that there should be a gradual improve- 
ment in the accuracy with which wo can inform prospective 
students as to their possibility of success in the various pro- 
grams that can be undertaken within the University. This 
should lead to some of the students seeking additional prepa- 
ration prior to entering the University, and to others selecting 
an alternative for their educational development. 

More of the students will attend college by commuting as 
modes of transportation improve, and as the University of 
Maryland and other universities look to the development of 
branch locations, and the costs for living on campus increase. 

That the alumni numbers will increase is obvious. That the 
future will see increasing numbers of alumni at various loca- 
tions throughout the world seems certain. A roster of present 
alumni shows location of a global nature. The ease of trans- 
portation and the increase in international cooperation will 




mean that alumni will be called on to perform important 
duties on a widespread basis. The alumni will play a more 
important part in our society tor each year a higher propor- 
tion of the leadership in government, in industry, and in 
private enterprise is coming from those who have completed 
a college degree. 

The pages in this magazine offer ample evidence of the 
dynamic nature of the opportunities and accomplishments 
that are those of the alumni. The future will record the accom- 
plishments that come with the constructive application of 
their talents. 



The Faculty 

Tin faculty will continue to contain within its ranks indi- 
viduals ol widely diversified training and knowledge essen- 
tial to full educational opportunity for the students who select 
the various programs of training. Their individual training 
and development can be expected to gradually become even 
more specialized, yet there will be continuing stress among 
the faculty members toward understanding of all aspects of 
life and matter. 

Their numbers will increase but not in direct proportion 
to the increases in the student body. Adequately prepared 
faculty members will become more and more scarce in a 
period when the demand for teachers is booming, and the 
needs of government and industry for trained scholars is 
progressively greater. 

The faculty, with the same resourcefulness that has char- 
acterized past improvements in instruction, will find ways for 
the individual member to serve a greater number of students 
in a more effective manner, and in doing this will help to 
create a situation in which better salaries can come without 
undue inflation in the costs for higher education. A long 
needed change will develop as faculties become better paid, 
for in the decade ahead the law of supply and demand will 
operate to insure better faculty salaries. 

A rapid rise can be expected in the number of graduate 
students in the University as a greater portion of the labora- 
tory teaching, the discussion periods, and the quiz sections 
become the responsibility of the graduate assistants. The 
support of research through contracts and grants will lead to 
the need for additional graduate assistants to devote full time 
to research activities. These developments will have a worth- 
while effect beyond the immediate needs of the University for 
they will provide a larger number of graduates at the doc- 
torate level for the staffing of the many educational institu- 
tions that do not have graduate programs, and for the needs 
of government and industry. 



The Staff 

The age o\ mechanization may be expected to have its 
greatest impact in university life in the area of the work 
of the staff. Electronic computing centers, stenographic aids, 
simplification of procedures, and many yet to be developed 
techniques and devices will all be helpful in allowing the 
staff to do a better job while increasing the productiveness of 
the individual. These factors, which will tend to decrease the 
ratio of staff to students, will be offset by others which require 
more precise information about the academic programs, the 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



research activities, and the efficiency ol University operation 

In the penod of short suppij oi faculty members, .1 greatei 
proportion oi the routine work thai is now accomplished bj 
the faculty will become the responsibility ol the staff. 



The Library 

Tin library system of the University, including the main 
library building and the departmental collections, will con- 
tinue to lie the prime organized source ot the knowledge 
which has been gamed through the years. The number of 
books and periodicals will grow at a more rapid rate than 
the increase in student numbers, and this growth will be in 
recognition of the increasing importance of having needed 
information readily available, of the increasing rate with 
which publications are appearing, and the increasing stress 
on the broad development of the individual student at as rapid 
a pace as is consistent with his capacity. The great libraries 
of this area, such as the Library of Congress, will continue 
to play an important part in the work of the University, par- 
ticularly in the activities of students at the graduate level. 

The accessibility of the library collections will continue to 
improve. The open stack system, which has proved so helpful 
on the College Park campus, is but one step in the direction 
of making the resources of the library more easily accessible 
to users. 



Physical Facilities 

Land, landscaping, the buildings, and the equipment of a 
university are planned so as to provide the surroundings 
that are essential to the functioning and well-being of students, 
faculty, and staff. Where these are properly planned they 
add materially in the efficiency with which these persons can 
discharge their responsibilities. If conceived in architecturally 
good taste, the physical facilities have an inspirational impact 
that is important. 

Among the important changes of the immediate future is 
the development of a better campus environment for the Bal- 
timore schools and the University Hospital, and new construc- 
tion at both College Park and Baltimore to replace some of 
the older buildings and to provide for the increasing student 
enrollments, research programs, and service functions. 

Physical facilities will continue to expand at the Univer- 
sity. This expansion will not be in direct ratio to the increased 
work of the University for newer methods are being developed 
each year for more efficient use of the space. The stress on 
the College Park campus will be on ever more careful plan- 
ning of the land use in order that the expansion of the Uni- 
versity can be made in a manner that will keep the various 
educational activities within an area convenient to students. 
Continued emphasis will be placed on peripheral parking to 
provide for the many students who will commute. This will 
have the added advantage of minimizing traffic in the center 
of the campus. The architecture of the new additions can be 
expected to be very similar to those now on the campus. The 
University is fortunate in having a uniformity of architecture 
that is in excellent taste and to have a type of architecture 
that allows as low cost for construction as can be found for 
buildings of a permanent nature. 

In Baltimore a major need is a master plan for the entire 
campus development. This will be finalized in the near future. 



With the aid ol man) governmental agencies, the Bal on 

campus will be developed so .is to provide somewh.ii greatei 

seclusion from noises and dangers ol vehieul.u traffic, to 

provide foi additional multilevel parking, and to create a 
setting to adequately serve the new buildings thai can be 

expected in (he twenty \e.u period ahead. 



COI I I Gl S AND SCHOOl S 

Tin id will he some additional colleges and schools as the 
University expands. Some ot these may be locations new 
to the University. Perhaps the first to be added will be the 
graduate school of social work on the Baltimore campus. 



Conclusion 

The University will expand in a manner that brings to 
bear all of the knowledge that has been developed in its 
past growth and in response to the needs of Maryland citizens. 
Increasing student enrollments and research opportunities will 
play a major role in the expansion ahead. Just as alumni who 
visit the University today remark that it has grown since 
their graduation and they hardly recognize their Alma Mater, 
so also may we expect future alumni to react. 




March-April, 1960 



11 



That Noble Experiment of 
the Lords Baltimore 



By Dr. Verne E. Chatelain 



Till ioi\i)i\(.. on MARCH 27. 1634. 01 "mi (IIY oi 
St. Mars" m the narrow neck of fertile land between the 
broad waters ol the Potomac and the PatUXent rivers was 
the culmination of a majestic plan, into which George Calvert 
and his son. Cecil Calvert, had poured many years ot tireless 
effort as well as much of their personal fortunes. 

Toda\. almost every school boy and school girl in America 
knows something of this story, and the citizens of Maryland — 
both the "native" and the "transplanted" varieties — pride 
themselves upon their recognition of this great achievement, 
which the) are accustomed to commemorate in special cere- 
monies on "Founder's Day." Yet. from that day to this, alter 
three hundred and twenty-six years of Maryland history, 
there still prevails an ignorance about the real purposes ami 
objectives of these two great (al verts, and very little realiza- 
tion of the true nature and significance o\ this "Noble Experi- 
ment." 

When the historic Ark and Dove weighed anchor on St. 
( ecilia's Day. November 22, 1633. and set out from Cowes 
in the Isle of Wight, there were on board, besides the crews, 
passengers — men. women, and children — numbering a few 
more than two hundred. The voyage was relatively uneventful, 
when we consider the terrors that a four months trip on the 
Atlantic in those days so often produced. After stop-overs at 
Barbadoes island in the West Indies and in the Virginia 
colony, a landing was made at St. Clements island (now 
Blakistone) on March 25. where religious services of thanks- 
giving were conducted by the Jesuit Father White. Before 
reaching St. Mary's river. Governor Leonard Calvert, acting 
upon instructions from Cecil, his brother and the Lord Pro- 
prietor, negotiated with the Indians and secured their peace- 
ful permission to occupy the lands involved in the Maryland 
charter. The site, selected for the first settlement and contain- 
ing some Indian structures, was paid for in hatchets, axes, 
cloth and other articles acceptable to the local Indian "king." 
Yaocomico. It was located at the mouth of the beautiful little 
St Mary's river, and just opposite the principal village ol 
the "king." The ground was high, the soil good. and. espe- 
cially important, there was adequate drinking water. Because 
the season was right for the planting of crops, everyone aided 
in this necessan work Meanwhile, the Indians generousl) 
furnished considerable food to supplement that which the 
settlers themselves could find tor their own use. 

I hus the colons moved swiftly to establish itself. Homes 
were built, lands were allotted, roads were built, and govem- 
ment was instituted, with the result that before the first 
year had come to a close, the Maryland settlement was smooth- 
l\ operating — and without am ot the ghastl) experiences that 
had so marked the lusioi \ ot Jamestown and of Plymouth. 
In fact, as is quite evident from the foregoing details, the 



colony, from its inception, was the beneficiary ot the careful 
planning and skill and wisdom of the Calvert family, which 
had conceived and then had launched it. 

Who. then, were these ( aherts. upon the understanding of 
whom so much depends, it we are to interpret the Maryland 
story correctly? 1 Generally it is written that theirs was a 
powerful ( atholic family, and that the Baltimore title was 
derived from an Irish source and carried with it a land grant 
of more than one thousand acres. It is also stressed that the) 
enjoyed the favor of the Stuart monarchy — particularly the 
patronage of James the First, and of his son. Charles the 
First. All of these tacts are true, but they only begin to 
present the situation that must be understood. 

For George Calvert there exists a good deal of biographical 
data, and this is fortunate, indeed, inasmuch as he was. 
though he did not live to become Maryland's first proprietor, 
the real father of the colony. Born in north central England, 
probably in the year 1580. during the reign of the great 
queen. Elizabeth the First, he was a contemporary of the 
incomparable William Shakespeare and of many other distin- 
guished men of letters and of statescraft — in an age of histor\ 
when England was fast arriving as the most powerful nation 
in the world. The Calvert family even then was upper middle 
class, but it had as yet no title of nobility. Also it was still 
Anglican, or Church of England, rather than Catholic Vl 
might be expected in these circumstances. Oeorge was sent 
to Oxford, where he received the coveted degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1597. He had proved to be a good student, and 
already was displaying those basic characteristics of skill, 
wisdom, and integrity, that won confidence in him from pow- 
erful figures in public affairs. Among these soon came to be 
his chief sponsor — the great Earl of Salisbury, then the Secre- 
tary ot State, an office which, one day, Calvert likewise would 
hold. 



GKIKI.I s I ()\C. (. 1 1MB I l> I HI C l\ 11 s| K\ l( E 1 ADDER IT IS 
not necessary here to relate in detail. Along the wax. 
he served with distinction as a special emissary to France, 
and for a time. too. held down the "Spanish" and "Italian" 
desks. During all of his career, he traveled widely, and thus 
became gradually acquainted with most of the world problems 
that England faced. It was in the colonial field, however, that 
he was to find his absorbing interest, and. as Secretarv of 
State and actuall) the chief administrative officer of the 
King's own Privy Council, he had a first hand official contact 
with both the I ondon Company (and its Jamestown colon) I 
and the New England Council (successor to the Plymouth 
Company). It can be stated, in this connection, that probably 
no man in England was so conversant with colonial matters 



12 



the Maryland Magazim 



as was George Calvert in the period 1619 to 1632. In fact, 
at one time < 1620 to 1624) "Calvert was on all the principal 
administrative committees in charge ol colonial affairs," 
including those tot the English Bast India Company; and 
when Virginia was declared a "royal colony" in lf>24. he was 
called upon to wind up the business of the expiring London, 
or Virginia. Company. 

It the stoiv oi George Calvert's civil service careei indicates 
stronglj that he was a man of tremendous ability, as well as 
an expert in the colonial field, there were other facets to this 
amazing lite that have deep significance in the conception 
ot the majestic plan lor the Maryland colony. It is not difficult 
to see. tor instance, why a man of his stature would attract 
the attention and the frank admiration and alTection of the 
Monarch. In all of his work, but primarily in the intimate 
circle of the Privj Council, he demonstrated always his deep 
devotion to the institution of kingship, but especially to James 
the First as a personal friend, and this devotion was recipro- 
cated to such an extent that the two became the closest of 
confidants. 

Admittedly. James had few close advisers, and that very 
fact made Calvert's position all the more important in the 
scheme of things. So, the time came when he was able to 
ask from the King what he most of all wanted — a grant of 
power to establish a colony of his own design, wherein he 
could apply all of the ideas that were in his mind. It is 
characteristic of the man, that what he proposed was not so 
much for himself as for the Monarchy itself and for England. 

The considerations, therefore, that were fundamental in 
George Calvert's thinking concerning his proposed new world 
colony become very important in understanding the Maryland 
venture. The first of these, as is indicated above, was his 
belief in the essential goodness of absolute monarchy, always, 
let it be noted, in the hands of a responsible and enlightened 
ruler, who could bring to his people a state of tranquility, of 
well-being, and even of personal civil and religious liberties, 
which, left to themselves, and in a more democratic form 
of society, they very likely would fritter away through internal 
bickering, bigotry, and compromise. In short, Calvert saw no 
true relationship between democracy and enlightened liberal- 
ism — certainly not in the seventeenth century world in which 
he lived. The sharp conflicts in his own England, between 
court party and puritans, clearly tended, he believed, to dem- 
onstrate that men bent on achieving power in the name of 
freedom were only too willing, on reaching their goals, to 
impose the principle of complete conformity on all opposing 
factions, so making a mockery of freedom. On the contrary, 
the enlightened monarch, above, and outside such factional 
storms, was the instrument by which equity and justice for 
all would be forthcoming. His colony, thus, must be governed 
by an absolute monarch, just as England must be. 

A second basic concern to Calvert in the establishment of 
his colony was the value that it would have for his beloved 
England. Here again, although the economic blessings of a 
prosperous colony were apparent to him, as well as the 
added power and prestige that it would give to the mother 
land in the fierce struggle with rival empire states, his primary 
concern was with the English internal problem, where civil 
war, bigotry, and factionalism threatened to destroy all of 
the great gains that were now becoming evident in the field 
of international competition. Maryland, therefore, must 
become, like Thomas More's "Utopia," a demonstration in an 
ideal form of society, with church and state in their separate 
spheres both serving humanity and helping to bring about 
a condition of complete civil and religious freedom. So Mary- 



land would he a place to which I n ■•land ilsclt might look foi 

the perfect solution to its own internal problems. What bettei 
wa\ could there be, < alvert reasoned, to help I ngland to 
realize its own great destiny? 

Bj some writers, a great ileal ot emphasis has been gi\cn 

to (ieorge Calvert's conversion late in his careei to ( athol 
icism; and the) conclude, from this fact, that the Brst I ord 

Baltimore I he was knighted in 1617) espoused the cause ol 

complete religious freedom in Maryland onlj at the point 
where he realized that his Catholic brethren would not be 
sate without the irrevocable recognition oi this principle 
in brief, that this step was forced upon him as a defensive 
maneuver. Nothing could be farther from the truth, and. 
on the contrary, such a position does grave injustice to the 
Catholic position in the colony, as well as to those other 
groups outside the Anglican Church. 2 Not only did the first 
Baltimore write into Maryland's Great Charter the guaran- 
tee of religious freedom, but Cecil's recorded instructions 
to the first Governor, Leonard (alvert, and to his other 
Catholic colonists after George's death also specifically spell 
out the principle. Cecil's stern orders in so many words 
clearly command that the Catholics, far from "taking over." 
must follow the path of unequivocal religious toleration with 
all men. Let it be said, then, emphatically, that George Calvert, 
and, just as truly, his son, Cecil as the first Lord Proprietor, 
never intended to establish a preponderantly Catholic colon) 
in Maryland, but rather a sanctuary of peace and tranquility, 
where all men of all faiths — <;ven of non-Christian inclinations 
— would be completely free to follow their special creeds 
without challenge. 



IN THIS CONTEXT, THE FAMOUS TOLERATION ACT OF 1649, 
which is often cited today as the basic charter of religious 
freedom, deserves particular attention. It is especially note- 
worthy that it came in the very year when the second Stuart, 
Charles the First, was beheaded and when civil war between 
Puritans and the Monarchists was at high tide, both in 
England and in Maryland. Because it operated to put the 
defenders of the Proprietor on the defensive, as well as 
because it was a retreat away from the ideal of complete 
religious freedom, it was something less than a genuine "tol- 
eration act." It does not, therefore, represent the climax of 
the struggle for religious freedom in Maryland, but rather 
the beginning of the long process by which the Baltimores 
were shorn of their powers and the climate of civil and 
religious liberty lessened. So it is that, on Founder's Day, 
it is well to remember, not only the great story of the plant- 
ing of the Maryland colony, but also the fact that freedom, 
as a way of life, is a tender, fragile flower, which may flourish 
if properly cared for, yet may be crushed and die, if unat- 
tended. This truth the great Baltimores, George and Cecil, 
knew full well. 



1. Probably the most useful of the works on the origin and 
colonial era of Maryland are: M. P. Andrews, History of Mary- 
land: Province and State, N. Y., 1929: also, by the same author. 
The Founding of Maryland, N. Y., 1933; and N. D. Mereness. 
Maryland as a Proprietary Province, N. Y.. 1901. In addition, 
there might be suggested, J. T. Scharf. History of Maryland from 
the Earliest Period to the Present Day, 3 vol., Bait., 1879. 

In this connection, the student may wish to probe carefully the 
earliest colonial activities of George Calvert — especially the story 
of the Avalon colony in Newfoundland. This colony may be 
regarded as a "pilot colony," preliminary to that of Maryland. 
Its charter (and general plan of operation) was similar to that 
of the later enterprise on the shores of Chesapeake. 



(Continued on next page) 



March- April, 1960 



13 



I Ik- position ol < ecil ( alvert, the tecond Lord Baltimore and 
the first Lord Proprietoi of Maryland, needs, perhaps, a woid ol 
definition Cecil look ovei the negotiations foi the Maryland 
charter, when they neared the final stage ol completion, al the 
nine ol the death ol ins fathei in 1632. George, not ( ecil, was 
entirelj responsible foi the ideas and the planning, including a 
pei son. il reconnaissance ol the < hesapeake H.i> area where the 
grant was finally made \ttei George's death, Cecil, who was 
very close to his father, and always intense!} interested in the 
plan, determined to push ahead toward its realization His con- 
tribution was. thus, that o! a skilliul administrator, whose superb 
h. milling ol the Maryland project left him in a strong position 
.is Proprietoi down to the tune o! his death in 1675 Hie I noch 
Pratt Library ol Baltimore contains the l>i Hugh H Young 
collection ol paintings of .ill of the I ords Baltimore (from George 



( alvert, the first, to Frederick, the sixth), who figure in the 
.md stors directly. I his collection represents copies of 
originals in England, furnished to Dr. Young in 1933. 

2. A very recent work. bv Thomas O'Brien Hanley, SJ.. entitled 
Theii Rights and Liberties, Westminster, Md., 1959. traces the 
liberal ( atholic tradition in England from the time of I nomas 
More down to its application in the Maryland colons in the 
Ordinance ol 1639 (not to he confused with the Toleration Act 
ten years later). Though misinterpreting possihlv the significance 
ol George Calvert's designs, and especially his initiative in the 
matter of civil and religious libertv respecting Maryland, the hook 
has great value in accounting for the point of view of the Catholic 
group in the colon) toward separation of church and state and 
religious freedom generally 




Do You Remember? 



Do >ol REMEMBER litis DORMITORY, OK Mil MIDI sis 
pictured here? The photograph is signed by John 
I hompson and dated 1904. II you can identify anyone in the 
picture, please notify the Maryland and Rare Books Depart- 
ment, McKeldin Iihrarv. University ol Maryland, College 
Park. Maryland. 

This photograph represents one type of item sought by the 
Library for its University and Stale archives. Other materials 
include letters, diaries, programs, catalogs, photographs. Near- 
books — all types of publications. 



1 1 you have an) University or State materials which can 
he added to the library's collection, please notify 

Proi t ssok How vKD Ro\ i i si \D, Director of Libraries 
or MRS. HvROin H n I s. Librarian. Maryland & Rare Books 
Department 

\h K i 1 din I IHRUO 

U\i\ i Ksm ot M \rn. i \m> 

COl I I (.1 P\KK. \1 VR^I 1 \M> 



14 



i n l M\ k \ i \ \ n M \(. \ / i \ i 



Alumni-University Liaison 
Advisory Committee 






Mrs. Singleton 



Dr. Triplet! 



Mr. Brigham 



P 






i:> 



hi* 



Dr. Pelczxir 



Dean Aisenberg 



/ 

Dr. Kiilm 



THE ADVENT OF 1960 OPENED A DECADE THAT PROMISES 
unusual growth of the University of Maryland in serving 
the increasing needs of higher education. In such a period 
the opportunities for cooperative effort between the Alumni 
and the University are expanding at an ever-increasing rate. 
Foreseeing the challenges of the 60's, a new means of com- 
munication has been established between the Alumni Council 
and the University Administration in the form of a jointly 
appointed liaison committee. 



The six-member Advisory Committee came into being by 
the joint action of the President of the University and the 
President of the Alumni Council. Mr. Boswell appointed Mrs. 
Elizabeth Rohr Singleton, Dr. William H. Triplett, and Mr. 
David L. Brigham as representing the Council, and Dr. Elkins 
appointed Dr. Michael J. Pelczar, Dean Myron S. Aisenberg. 
and Dr. Albin O. Kuhn to represent the University. 

(Continued on /'(/.s,'c 17) 



March-April, 1960 



15 



Alumni Celebrate 
Charter Day 



CHARTER DAY, l ( >M»: \ DA\ RESERVED M)K COMMEMORAT- 
mg the establishment ol the state university. 

I he University ol Maryland in Baltimore had its beginning 
in the Medical School, established in 1807. In College Park, 
the year 1856 witnessed the hirth of the Maryland Agricultural 
( ollege. Charter Day recognized these beginnings and cele- 
brated the looth anniversary of the first classes to he held 
on the (ollege Park campus. 

\s part of the formal ceremony for the occasion. Governor 
ol Maryland J. Millard Tawes proclaimed January 20, 
"Charter Day," that same day which, in 1807. saw the 
charter become law. establishing the School of Medicine in 
Baltimore. 



I ess lormal recognition ot this sigmlicant event was taken 
by a large number of alumni and friends ot the University 
at a gathering Januarv 22. Under the sponsorship of the 
Alumni Club of Baltimore. Da\id W. Bien. President, the 
group gathered for a banquet in the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

A high point in this e\emng event was the speech ot General 
PI wood R. Quesada. distinguished Maryland alumnus. He 
enlisted in the Army in 1924 as a private and rose to the 
rank of three-star general. As Administrator of the Federal 
Aviation Agency. Gen. Quesada has responsibility for modern- 
izing the federal airwavs system, directing air traffic control 
of civil and military aircraft, and issuing and enforcing air 
safety rules. He is the first to head this new. more powerful 
and comprehensive Federal organization. 




vi i mm WD FRIENDS of the University <" Maryland celebrate Charter Day at a banquet at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

/6 thi \I\rvi \\n Magazine 




Alumni- University Liaison 
Advisory Committee 

i c 'on tin ued from page I s i 



M UMNI and FRIENDS enjoy a social 
mixer before the Charter Day banquets. 



Gen. Quesada spoke concerning aviation and its ramifica- 
tions with respect to public safety. He pointed out the spec- 
tacular growth of aviation in numbers of people employed, 
passengers carried and passenger miles flown. He outlined 
the need for regulation and supervision to improve the nation's 
air safety. He summarized, saying, "I should like to quote a 
comment from one of our critics. FAA — he said — had a mania 
for safety. Ladies and gentlemen. I couldn't agree with him 
more completely." 

Gen. Quesada also remarked, ''We alumni with our common 
denominator of a college education must rather turn the 
moment to higher learning as it is today. Our concern must 
be with the colleges and their efforts to meet a very demand- 
ing future." 




GOV. J. MILLARD TAWES PRESENTS the official Charter 
Day Proclamation to David W . Bien, president of the 
University of Maryland Alumni Club of Baltimore. 



I he Alumni-University liaison Advisory Committee is 
charged with the responsibility ol discussing any and all ques- 
tions that may be considered to be ol importance to the Uni- 
versity in maintaining and improving Alumni-University 
cooperation. The agenda for its discussions will originate 
from the actions and considerations within the University and 
the Alumni Council. 

In appointing the University representatives to the liaison 
committee. President Elkins stated: "Among the changes that 
will make the decade ahead important in the life ol the Uni- 
versity is the rapid increase in enrollments that is sure to 
come, and the widespread recognition of need lor greater 
research endeavor that can best be undertaken in a university 
setting. Full support of the Alumni can be of immeasurable 
aid in meeting these needs. The Liaison Advisory Committee 
can perform an important service in communication between 
the Alumni and the University." 

President Boswell expressed the feeling that each alumnus 
of the University of Maryland owes a debt that can be repaid 
only by devoting his knowledge of the University and its 
place in the educational and research needs of the State and 
Nation to support the continued growth and improvement of 
its programs. Every effort must be made to maintain complete 
cooperation between the alumni and the administration for 
their common purpose. 

The Committee, which will be appointed annually, is at 
present composed entirely of individuals who graduated from 
the University of Maryland. 

Mrs. Elizabeth R. Singleton is a graduate of the School of 
Nursing, class of 1947. She is a resident of Baltimore, is Vice 
President of the Alumni Council, and has been active on 
various committees of the Council as a representative of the 
School of Nursing. 

Dr. William H. Triplett, member of the class of 1911. has 
been active for many years as the Executive Secretary of the 
Medical School Alumni Association, and has represented the 
Medical School as a member of the Alumni Council. He 
is Vice President of the Council. In addition to his many 
duties in the Medical School, he has found time to develop 
a widespread reputation for his culinary efforts, specializing 
in seafood. 

Mr. David L. Brigham. member of the class of 1938, is a 
graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences, is Director of 
Alumni Relations, and has been in this work at the University 
since 1947. 

Dr. Michael J. Pelczar. member of the class of 1936. College 
of Arts and Sciences, is now Professor of Microbiology 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. He has been active in 
the work of the faculty organization of the University, and 
served as chairman of the subcommittee that developed the 
faculty salary plan now in effect at the University. 

Dean Myron S. Aisenberg, member of the class of 1922. 
is a graduate of the School of Dentistry, and has been Dean 
of the School of Dentistry since 1954. 

Dr. Albin O. Kuhn. member of the class of 1938. is a 
graduate of the College of Agriculture. He has long been 
associated with the University and was appointed Executive 
Vice President in 1958. 



March-April, I960 



17 



Maryland Books and Authors 

Edited by Mrs. Harold Hayes t Haul, 

Maryland and Rare Books Department 



Bode, ( arl I III ANATOMY 01 

AMI Kl( AN POPl I \l< < II.- 

1 1 Ki 1840-1861. Berkeley : Uni- 
versitv ol ( alifornia Press. 1959. 
292 p. $6.00. 

Tins in tok. The Anatomy <>j Ameri- 
can Popular Culture, 1X40-1X61. 
deals with the trends ol popular culture 
m .in especially vibrant period ol Amer- 
ican growth. 

In K. the author discusses many fac- 
ets ol American culture: plays, Hooks. 
magazines, art. music, architecture. 
newspapers, etc. 

According to Dr. Bode, in his "An 
Aside to the Reader." he has used the 
"people's choice" as the basis tor his 
selection ot examples which had an 
influence on American character. 

Dr. Bode begins his discussions of 
culture in this period with the drama. 
In this chapter, he gives a fair amount 
of attention to Harry Watkins, career 
actor, dramatist and producer. He brings 
out b\ his quotations from current plays 
the lusty, many-sided, alive drama of 
the period and points out that the 
audiences were equally strenuous. They 
applauded or hissed, according to their 
pleasure or irritation. 

The leading actor o\ the time. Edwin 
Forrest, in keeping with the fact that 
Shakespeare overshadowed everything. 
said. "I hold that next to God. Shakes- 
peare comprehended the mind of man." 
American audiences agreed. 

At the same time. Americans showed 
a real interest in politics and argued 
with a zest greater than today's. The 
newspapers, the author states, both re- 
flected and increased this interest, but 
did not influence the voting public. Most 
ot the voters, it seemed, were at odds 
with most of the newspapers. On the 
whole. however, newspaper reading grew 
decade by decade. 

It was during this period that Horace 
Greeley's Tribune was started, with its 
coverage of civic events, cultural mate- 
rial, human interest stories, and superb 
editorials. 

It was also the time of the "mammoth 
weekly" in newspaper form, grown so 
because ot the demand tor sentimental 
fiction. 

Among the magazines, Harper's ex- 
erted the widest influence on American 




Dr. Bode 

culture. The outstanding periodical for 
women was Godey's Lady's Hook, with 
a circulation of 150. 000. 

Women may have been reading 
Godey's, but some were also writing. 
In his chapter on "The Scribbling Wo- 
men." Dr. Bode discusses the Susan 
Warner novel Wide, Hide World, as the 
most-talked-about domestic novel as the 
1850's opened. Other women such as 
Caroline lee Hentz. Maria Cummins 
and Mary Jane Holmes followed Susan 
Warner. 

"In the ordinary course of events. 
sa\s Dr. Bode. "Harriet Beecher Stowe 
would have made a modest contribution 
to mid-nineteenth century American 
culture." She would have published do- 
mestic novels, with an average sale, but 
the timeliness of her Uncle Tom's Cabin 
increased its popularity and made it an 
experience for every reader. It was so 
effective that main scenes have become 
Folk-lore. 

The appearance o\ Jenny l.ind. the 
songs of Stephen Foster, contributed to 
our musical culture. 

Gothic architecture. Emanuel I eutze, 
Currier & Ives, and Horatio Greenough's 
"George Washington" and Hiram Pow- 
ers' "The Greek Slave" all play a part 
in the fine arts contribution to American 
culture. 

I he book has been well-illustrated 
with photographs and art representative 
ol the period. 



"Summaries ol Trends" also add to 
the interest, and quotations from con- 
temporarv sources document Dr. Bodes 
thesis — that a culture can mature. 

I)i Mode returned to the United 
States in September. 1959. alter more 
than two vears in Great Britain as Cul- 
tural Attache at the American Emhassv 
and Cultural Affairs Officer with the 
United States Intormation Service. 

Dr. Bode, a professor ol English with 
special emphasis on American literature 
and civilization, is also author ot a new 
\ illume ot poetry, The Man Behind You. 



Man of Reason, by Dr. Alfred O. 
Aldridge. will be the next title to be 
reviewed. 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 

Dr. (oki is H vvv \n 

Dr. Ernest Cory is enjoying his retire- 
ment in Hawaii. Dr. and Mrs. C'orv are 
visiting their daughter and son-in-law. 
Commander R. T. Blackwell. who are 
stationed at Oahu. Hawaii. The C orvs 
have been attending the Orchid Show 
and the Art Institute in addition to the 
usual tourist attractions. 

Porter C <>i \n Agent 

Roy D. Porter. "54. has been appointed 
Worcester Countv agent, to fill the 
vacancy resulting from the retirement 
of Robert T. Grant. 

A native of Kent Countv. Porter 
served as assistant county agent in 
Queen Annes Countv from 1954 to 
1956 and in Worcester Countv from 
that date to the present. 

As a student in college. Porter ma- 
jored in animal husbandry and took part 
in many student activities that helped 
develop leadership abilities. He was 
active in the Block and Bridle Club and 
a member of the College Livestock Judg- 
ing team that competed at Timonium 
and the International at Chicago. 

(oiiii i Hi vns Svi i s 

Roger W . C ohill. '47. Vice President in 
charge ol sales. Miller Chemical Com- 
pany, Baltimore, was pictured on the 
cover o\ the November issue of Farm 



IS 



T H 1 M.\RVI \ N M AGAZ1N I 



Chemicals He was moderator at a 
marketing seminar for (he farm chemi- 
cals industT} sponsored by Farm Chem- 
icals magazine. 



Foster Honored 

Dr. John E. Foster has boon honored 
with a Life Membership in the Mary- 
land Beet Cattle Producers Association. 
He is Head of the Department of Ani- 
mal Husbandry at the University of 
Maryland College Of Agriculture. 

At a recent meeting ol the Associa- 
tion, Dr. Foster was presented a certifi- 
cate of honorary membership, "in recog- 
nition of his outstanding service to the 
livestock producers of the State," by E. 
Brooke Lee, Damascus, Md., Vice Pres- 
ident of the Association. The certificate 
was signed by Mr. Lee; Lawrence E. 
Downey, '38, Sharpsburg, President; 
and Herman F. Ramsburg, '36, Cam- 
bridge, Secretary-Treasurer. 



Gottwals Bank Official 

Directors of the First National Bank 
of Southern Maryland, at Upper Marl- 
boro, have announced the election of 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38, as an Assistant 
Cashier. Abe will continue in charge 
of the bank's agriculture department. 
He was chairman of the Maryland 
Bankers Association for three years. He 
joined the bank in 1952, after 11 years 
with the Baltimore district of the Farm 
Credit Administration. 



Marketing Authority 

George S. Abshier, '42, in Agricultural 
Economics is Extension Economist in 
Marketing for Oklahoma. His most re- 
cent publication is on the management 
of cooperative associations. 



Ken Warner Honored 

Dr. Kenneth F. Warner, University of 
Maryland, was one of eight elected an 
Honorary Fellow of the American So- 
ciety of Animal Production, at the 
society's annual meeting, in Chicago. 
The society is composed of American 
and Canadian animal scientists. Dr. 
Warner is Professor of Extension Ser- 
vice Studies and Training in the College 
of Agriculture. 

He was presented a certificate and 
life membership in the Society by a fel- 
low faculty member of the University 



oi Maryland, Dr. W. W. Green ol the 
\nim.ii Husbandry Dept Dr. Green is 
Chairman ol the Committee for Hon- 
orary Vwards ol the Society and is also 

president of the North Atlantic Section 
of the Society 

Dr. Warner began his career as an 
animal husbandman with degrees from 
the University of Nebraska and the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. He spent several 
years as an instructor in the University 



ol Minnesota, and a comparable period 
as Extension Animal HiisIi.iih1iii.lii at 
the University ol Nebraska. In 1921, be 
joined the t SDA serving as Meats in 

vestigator, Bureau ol Animal [ndll 

until 1936 I hat year, be rejoined the 
Extension Service as Meal Specialist. 

He became a I raining Specialist ol the 

Foreign Agricultural Service in 1951; 

returning to Federal Extension as i ram 

i( 'ontinued mi next page) 



Carrier 



is on the Campus 



Around the World 

More people enjoy ( CSkTTlQT 

Air Conditioning 

than any other make . . 



The CARRIER Division, THE UNITED CLAY 
PRODUCTS CO. is proud to have 
installed Carrier equipment in the 
following University of Maryland Buildings 

Administration Building 
Chemical Engineering Dept. 
Engineering Building 
Physics Building 
President's Residence 
Skinner Building 
Sylvester Hall 
Symons Hall 
Terrapin Room 



Carrier Division 
of 

The United Clay Products Co. 

3055 V St., N.E. 

Washington 18, D. C. 

LA 6-7000 

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL AIR CONDITIONING 



March-April, 1960 



19 




CAREER 
OPPOR- 
TUNITIES 




WESTINGHOUSE-BALTIMORE 

has the challenging projects 
and advanced research on 
which engineering careers 
thrive . . . combined with the 
finest of facilities and an 
engineer-oriented manage- 
ment policy. Technological 
breakthroughs in Molec- 
tronics, 3-dimensional radar, 
Missile Guidance and other 
space age electronic programs 
have created outstanding 
openings for creative en- 
gineers at Westinghouse- 
Baltimore. 



SEND YOUR RESUME TO 

Mr. A. M. Johnston, 
Dept. 258 



Westinghouse 

BALTIMORE 

P O Boi 748 Baltimore 3. Maryland 

Al* AMI • I If CTRONIC* . OOOMAMCl 



ing Specialist in 1954. Since his retire- 
ment from I cderal Service in IM57. Dr. 
Warner has been .i member ol the Uni- 
versity oi Maryland faculty. 



K Mk higan 

Id hear your name called in a distant 
place is interesting. On a trip to Mich- 
igan State I niversity, I was surprised 
to meet William B. I as lor. '47; he is a 
field representative tor a large dairv in 
northern Michigan. As "Reds" said, 
"this is the advantage ol being an 
alumnus." 



Foreign Visitors Oi impse Makh and 

A(.RK I I I I Kt 

I oreign \isitors to the Maryland College 
ol Agriculture are getting a glimpse at 
plans and purposes of hand Orant Col- 
leges, and the College is using these con- 
tacts to get them to the Maryland farm 
scene. 

The most recent visitors uere mem- 
bers of a Rumanian delegation of finan- 
ciers. At the college. Dean Gordon 
( aims gave them a quick look at Mar\- 
land"s resources and agricultural devel- 
opments. 

A trip to the Lawson King Farm. 
Montgomery County introduced the 
Rumanians to their first American farm 
and the only farm the\ will visit during 
a month's stay in the United States. 

Interested in finance, they asked W. I. 
Kings farm manager for a look at the 
kind of records farmers keep. Members 
of the delegation were interested in sim- 
plified record keeping. sa\ing that farm- 
ers in their country waste too much time 
keeping records. 

Dairy Herd Improvement Association 
records showed the \isitors how breed- 
ing programs are affected by production 
records of individual cows. 

Seeing their astonishment at the cost 
of modern ha\dr\ers. King told them. 
"One field of ha\ will pay the cost oi a 
dr\er — if that field's yield is lost." 

Visiting the College ot Agriculture 
and the Montgomery Count] farm were 
Radu Manescu, deputy minister of 
finance; Adrian fosipescu, director in 
the judicial and treats department oi the 
I oreign Ministry; Nicolae Cristescu, 
deputy director oi the Mmistr\ ot 
Finance: Oheorge Raeuleanu. secretary 
ol the Rumanian I egation. Washington, 
and Mrs lre\e Yianu. interpreter. 

During the fall semester. J9 foreign 
\isiiors have been quests at the Mar\- 



~ 



r - - 



So Good in GLASS! 

Milk and other beverages foi 
VOUB family taste better — fresh 
and wholesome — when served in 



GLASS BOTTLES 

You can SEE the Quality and 
Quantity you are receiving. 



INSIST ON GLASS BOTTLES 

No Loss or Contamination of 
Flavor 



LEAKPROOF — SPARKLING 
TRANSPARENT 

THE BUCK GLASS 
COMPANY 

FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 
Baltimore 30. Md. 

Originators of the S 

Milk- Bottle 



Look for the Sign 




S< ■rinii Unit intort '.-■• Fit ■ 
Italian Cuii 

Open 11 o.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

300 Albermorle St. MU 5-2811 

Baltimore 2. Md. MU 5-2812 



20 



I M li Ma RVI \M) M AGAZINl 



hmd College of Agriculture. Contacts 
arc made with the College through em- 
bassies, USDA Foreign Agricultural 

Service, United Nations and interna 
tional agencies. Visitors include diplo- 
mats, business and technical men look- 
ing for better methods and information 

in United States agriculture. 

Thirteen countries— Thailand, Aus 

tralia, China. Indonesia. Iurke\. Eng- 
land, Yugoslavia. Netherlands. I asl 
Africa. Poland. Russia. Rumania and 
Greece — have been represented bj their 
39 representatives. 



A Good Re< ord 

Steve Kahoe, '4 l ). Street. Maryland, has 
established a record for future alumni. 
I he Kahoes lived on the campus while 
Steve was a combination student and 
herdsman lor the Animal Husbandly 
Department. They now have a family 
ol 13 children. (Can any alumnus top 
this?) 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



Microbiology Notes 

Dr. David Gottlieb, Professor of Plant 
Pathology at the University of Illinois, 
presented the second lecture in the De- 
partment of Microbiology 1959-60 
series (Lectures in Theoretical and Ap- 
plied Aspects of Modern Microbiology) 
on Thursday, January 14th, in Symons 
Hall Auditorium. Dr. Gottlieb's talk was 
entitled "Actinomycetes — Challenge to 
the Taxonomists." Each academic year 
three outstanding microbiologists are in- 
vited to the campus to present lectures 
concerning their work, and participate 
in discussions with all interested persons. 
The series is sponsored jointly by the 
American Cyanamid Company, Chas. 
Pfizer and Sons, and Merck and Com- 
pany. Copies of the lectures are made 
available for distribution to interested 
persons. The third presentation was 
given on Wednesday, March 9th, in 
Symons Hall Auditorium, by Dr. Ned 
B. Williams, Professor of Microbiology, 
School of Dentistry, University of 
Pennsylvania. His talk was on "Micro- 
bial Ecology of the Oral Cavity." 

(Continued on next page) 



Be Really 
He freshed! 

Have A 

Cofce 



Silver Spring Coca Cola Bottling Co. 




McLeod 6c Romborg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

— •— 

CUT STONE 

— •— 
Bladensburg, Maryland 



THE MARTIN COMPANY 

WATERPROOFING 

Rear 1215 Eye Street, N.W. 

Washington 5, D. C. 

REpublic 7-0705 





WALLOP and SON 






J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. J. DOUGLASS WALLOP. 3rd 






Class of 1919 Class of 1942 






— 1 N S U R A NCE — 






Fire - Automobile - Life - Accident - Liability - Bonds 






EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 






1101 VERMONT AVE.. N.W.— Suite 405 Executive 3-1400 WASHINGTON 5, D. C. 



March-April, 1960 



21 



Dr. Michael F Pelczar, Jr., Profaaoi 
ol Microbiology) has been invited to 
participate in a National Science Foun- 
dation Institute tor I eachers being held 
at the Universit) ol Georgia, Athens. 
( reorgia 

INVESTIGATION INK) TYPES (»l I (.(.S 

\ rtudj of the mechanism which en- 
ables the eggs of certain invertebrate 
animals to withstand long periods ot 
adverse environmental conditions will 
be undertaken by Dr. Harris J. hinder, 
Assistant Professor o! /oology. 

Supported by a SI 0,000 National Sci- 
ence Foundation grant. Dr. Finder's 



^fenluW g^ 




lajuati/ij and 
^vrtiifrif ^rn 



FINE FOOD & DRINKS 

Visit Our Internationally Famous Wine Cellar 

FIFTH AVE. & BRENTWOOD 

DUNDALK, MD. 

2 New Dining Rooms added to serve our 

patrons better. 

Frivate Banquet facilities to accommodate 

10 to 125 guests. 

For Reservations Call 

ATwater 5-0520 • ATwater 4-9854 



project will involve an investigation of 
the chemical nature ot the substance or 
substances that allow certain animals 
to produce both thick and thin-shelled 
eggs depending on phvsiological and en- 
vironmental conditions 

It is believed that the phenomenon 
ot quinone tanning, a process in which 
there is a hardening ot the cuticular pro- 
tein, such as. in the outside skeleton of 
an insect, is the same protective mecha- 
nism responsible for the hardening of 
the eggs in invertebrate animals." he 
explained. 

"A thorough study will be made with 
microscopic animals to clarify the 
chemical events that result in the hard- 
ening of the shell substance," he con- 
tinued, "and to determine if these events 
are comparable to the general phenome- 
non of quinone tanning. 

"To make this comparison it will be 
necessary to study the factors involved 
in determining the type of egg which 
will be produced, as well as the mecha- 
nism underlying the formation of thin 
and thick-shelled eggs in those animals 
which produce both types." he con- 
cluded. 

Dr. Finder pointed out that the in- 
vestigation would include microscopic 
study of the ovary and accessory re- 
productive tissues in these animals, the 
biochemical activity before and after 
shell synthesis, and the chemical nature 



of the substance or substances contri- 
buting to shell formation. 

A graduate of Fong Island Univer- 
sity where he received a B.S. degree in 
biology in 195 1, Dr. Finder attended 
his first year of graduate school at 
Brown L'niversity. He then transferred 
to Cornell University where he obtained 
an M.S. degree in 1955 and a Ph.D. 
degree in 1958. After a year of post- 
doctoral work as a research associate at 
the Argonne National Laboratory he 
was appointed to the University of 
Maryland faculty. 

Haines Joins Esso 

Ernest V. Haines, '30, has joined the 
staff of Esso Research and Engineering 
Company. The firm is the major scien- 
tific and engineering affiliate of the 
Standard Oil Company (New Jersey). 
Mr. Haines also has received a law de- 
gree from Georgetown University. Be- 
fore joining Esso Research, he was with 
International Minerals and Chemical 
Corporation for eleven years. 



Mrs. Stokes at Washington 

Mrs. Mary Perkins Stokes, '53, is now 
the Associate Editor of the University 
of Washington Business Review. The 
Business Review is published bimonthly 
during the academic year. 



Cloverlatid 
Janus 
Dairy 

* 

Quality 
Products 
Matched 

by 

Quality 
Service 




CL0YERLAND--THE DAIRY WITH COWS (Calves, too) 

► Visit Cloverland's Golden Guernsey Farm — Dulaney Valley A 
Road — 8 miles north of Towson. Milking starts at 4 P.M. ^ 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



COAJ i is N wi ENSIGN 

Charles W. Coale, '59, was recently 

graduated from the Navy's Officer Can- 
didate School in Newport, Rhode Is- 
land. Mr. Coale now holds the rank ol 

I nsign. 



Dr. Toil Visits Monmouth College 

Dr. John S. Toll, Professor and Chair- 
man of the Department of Physics, 
served as a \ siting lecturer at Mon- 
mouth College, West Long Branch, New 
Jersey, November 17 and 18. 

He visited under the auspices of the 
American Association of Physics Teach- 
ers and the American Institute of Phys- 
ics as part of a broad, nationwide pro- 
gram to stimulate interest in physics. 
The program is now in its third year 
and is supported by the National Sci- 
ence Foundation. 

Dr. Toll gave lectures, held informal 
meetings with students and assisted fac- 
ulty members with curriculum and re- 
search problems. He was the guest of 
Professor John R. Hobbie, chairman of 
the Monmouth College Department of 
Physics. 



French Club 

The Cercle frangais has been reactivated 
by Mr. Leo Lemaire of the Depart- 
ment's staff. Co-sponsor is Dr. Alter. 
French-speaking foreign students have 
been among the active students. An il- 
lustrated talk in French on Viet Nam 
was presented this past winter by a Viet 
Namese student. 



French Over WMUC 

Mr. Lemaire has been broadcasting over 
the campus radio station to assist ele- 
mentary students with their first text- 
book. 



Speeches on French Matters 

Professor William R. Quynn has been 
lecturing for the Frederick Rotary Club, 
first on "Problems in Foreign Language 
Teaching," and in December on "The 
Algerian Situation." He has also been 

(Continued on next page) 

March- April, 1960 




TO SUPPORT A GIANT. 



only steel is strong enough. The framework of Mary- 
land's vast Student Activities Building contains 14 241- 
foot steel arches fabricated by Dietrich Brothers, Inc. 
It's just one of many handsome buildings on the 
College Park campus containing steel fabricated by 
Dietrich Brothers, Inc. 

WHEN THE JOB CALLS FOR STEEL . . . 

Call . . . 

DIETRICH BROTHERS, INC. 

Baltimore 18, Maryland Hopkins 7-9700 

Washington, D. C. 

Raleigh, N. C. (Insurance Bldg.) Temple 2-5623 



BROTHERS 



STEEL WAREHOUSING 
STEEL FABRICATING 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



• WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 



HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Spring" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co. 9 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO.. Inc. 

Link Belt Company "Pyrene" & "MSA" Industrial 

Power Transmission • "C-0-TW0" • Gas Masks. Canisters 
Supplies Fire Extinguishers & First Aid Equipment 



2600 12th STREET, N.E. 



WASHINGTON 18, D. C. 



LAwrence 6-1362 



Finer Foods Since 1858 




W 

Washington, D. C. 



Official Eating Place 
of the Alumni 



1107 Connecticut Ave. 



Next to 
the Mayflower Hotel 




The C0HN & BOCK CO. 

Lumber • Building Material 

poultry FEEDS livestock 

PRINCESS ANNE, MARYLAND 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



23 



doing reviews for the Washington /'"W 
ni hooks bj Benjamin ( oust. mi. 

Professor Ui»\»" is historian tor the 
Frederick Count] Historical Society. 
He is a member oi the ( ommittee on 
the ( imI War ( Centennial, 



NEV* I II I RAR\ M tGAZINI 

Professor Leonora C. Rosenfield, who 
returned to the campus List I. ill after 
leave lor research on .1 hook she is pre- 
paring tor Harcourt, Brace & Co., con- 
tributed an article last spring on " I he 
Philosopher and the Poet" tor the first 
is- uc of Palinurus, edited by Professor 
Herbert Schaumann of our English De- 
partment. 



\S 11 sos \\ ki 1 1 s Aki [< 1 I 

Samuel W. Wilson. '52. has written an 
article titled "New ( andlcpower Stand- 
ards" which has been published by the 
National Bureau ot Standards. 



Dr. Goode Receives Administrative 
Post 



( OKKI < ll'iN 

In the January-February issue. l)i Donald 
\s Krimel was incorrecdy named ai l> 
Harold v* Krimel I he item describes l)i 
Krimel'i appointment to the chairmanship 
ot tin.- National ( ouncil on Public Rela- 
tions Education. 



graduate stud) at the I Diversity 
Pennsylvania lor si\ years prior to join- 
ing the Rennselaer faculty. 



Si k\ hi Ni us 

John K. Fritsch, '58, is a member ol 
the Quantico Marines football team 
which had an outstanding season this 
year. 

A first solo (light was made recently 
In Naval Aviation Cadet Warren 1. 
Rauhofer, '59. 

Carolyn B. Draim, '59, has joined the 
Special Services stall of the L. S. Army 
in Europe as a service club recreation 
director. She is present!) stationed in 
Nurnberg. Germany. 



Electronics Lxhor.vtory 



the President's office, the laboratory was 
Utilized in a language I eachers' Train- 
ing ( ourse during the past summer. 
I he laboratory can be used simultane- 
ously by thirty-four students, to whom 
five different languages ma\ be sent at 
one time lor practice purposes. 

Members ol the language stalls ha\e 
prepared tapes tor student use 



HlSTORK \l HlHI lOGRAPm 

Professor ( . ( . ( hen has assisted the 
American Historical Association in the 
preparation of its new (iuide to Histori- 
cal Literature. Its editor. William ( o- 
lumbus Davis, has expressed apprecia- 
tion for his thorough, accurate, and 
valuable checking of the material in the 
Chinese and Japanese languages which 
will appear in the (iititle. 



I \C \NSION IN (HIM Si ( I XSSI s 

Professor C hen reports a marked in- 
crease in enrollment for courses in 
( binese language and civilization. 



Dr. Stephen H. Goode. '4 l >. has been 
appointed Assistant Director ol" Admis- 
sions at the Rensselaer Polytechnic In- 
stitute where he has taught English since 
1 c > 5 .S . Dr. Goode taught and engaged in 



The foreign Language Department has 
had a functioning electronics laboratory 
since June. 1959. Designed and installed 
by Dr. Philip Rovner. of the Depart- 
ment, with funds made available through 



Ni v> APPODS 1 Ml si 

Jean V. Alter has been appointed to the 
French staff. He has a Licence in Ro- 
mance Philology from the University of 



RIDE TRAILWAYS 

5 STAR LUXURY SERVICE 

• RESERVED SEATS •HOSTESS ABOARD 

• COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS •LIMITED STOPS 

• WASHROOM EQUIPPED 

Daily from Washington and Baltimore to 

NEW YORK — RICHMOND — NORFOLK 



Charter Buses for 
trips anywhere, 
anytime 




Call your 
nearest Trailways 
Terminal 



24 



1 hi Maryland Magazine 



Brussels, a Doctorate from the Soi 
bonne, and another from the Universitj 
oi ( hicago where he waa holder ol .1 
Fulbright-Smith-Mundt grant. I lis latest 
publication appeared in the September 
1959 issue ol the CI 1 Journal, " I reat- 
ment ol rime in the French New 
Novel'."' He has been active in the 
Prince Georges ( ountj Ills Program 
(Foreign Language in the Elementary 

School). 



Montgomery County Appointmeni 

Montgomery Countj lias taken from 
the Department of Foreign Languages. 
Dr. Philippe Arsenault and made him 

Secondary Supervisor in charge oi lan- 
guage teachers in its secondary schools. 
Dr. Arsenault last summer taught a 
training course for state language teach- 
ers at the University of Maryland, where 
he had for some years been active in 
directing the Department's laboratory 
work in French. 



Dr. Lejins Appointed Special 
Consultant 

Dr. Peter P. Lejins, Professor of Soci- 
ology, has been appointed special con- 
sultant by the National Probation and 
Parole Association. 

As consultant, Dr. Lejins will prepare 
a survey and analysis of the Associa- 
tion's literature and research with regard 
to the impact of motion pictures and 
television on young people, particularly 
"horror films" and crime and violence 
depictions as they may have delinquen- 
cy-inducing effects. The overall project 
has been made possible by a grant from 
the Ford Foundation. 

Dr. Lejin's study will serve as the 
basis for a conference of psychiatrists, 
psychologists, educators, juvenile court 
judges, law enforcement officers, direc- 
tors of youth agencies and probation of- 
ficers, to be held some time in early 
1960, with the hope that some authori- 
tative conclusions may be reached. 



New Faculty Members 

Three lecturers have joined the overseas 
academic division in the Speech Depart- 
ment this year while on leave of ab- 
sence from their regular teaching as- 
signments. Dr. John Robson is teaching 

(Continued on next page) 



HARRIS & BROOKS, Inc 



EXCAVATORS 



2413 Blue Ridge Ave. 



LO 5-0867 
LO 5-0868 



Wheaton, Md 



FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT CO., Inc. 

— Since 1931 — 

Designers & Manufacturers of 

COMPLETE RESTAURANT, COMMERCIAL 

and INSTITUTIONAL KITCHENS 

Fabricators of Stainless Steel 
Service and Repair 

4908 Lawrence St. Hyattsville, Md. 

APpleton 7-3765 



1 ^ «- 






BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"Seco*ne 2ualtiy Ccmici&uA." 

PLANT: 621-27 G STREET, N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVIllE, MD. WArfield 7-08B0 



COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, INC. 

AP 7-8200 
SEVEN CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 

John M. Conroy, President 



Thomas E. Clark ? Inc* 

Pliunltina and <Jreaiina Setuice 

AA2A Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 

WOodley 6-71 22 Day or Night, WOodley 6-5181 



March- April, 1960 



25 



and traveling the European circuit while 
OD leave from Kansas State College. 
Professor Robert Rutherford is the 

resident lecturer at the Munich Junior 

( ollege Branch in Germany while on 

leave ol absence from State Univer- 
sity teacher's College, Genesco, New 
York. Di < baiks Parkhurst, Brooklyn 

( ollege, is teaching speech on the Euro- 
pean circuit. 



Zucker Honored 

Dr. \doll F. Zucker, Professor and 
Head of the University's Department 
of Foreign Languages, has been honored 
"for distinction in the field of German- 
ics" by the Federal Republic of Ger- 
many. He was cited by President Theo- 
dore Heuss and received "The Order of 
the First Class." 

The award presentation was made by 
German Cultural Attache Bruno Wer- 
ner on behalf of President Heuss in a 
ceremony held at the German Embassy. 

Dr. Zucker was appointed to the fac- 
ulty in 1923. He holds degrees from the 
University of Illinois and the University 
of Pennsylvania. The author of numer- 
ous publications including Amerika and 
Deutschland, he visited Germany in 
1947 and lectured at six German uni- 
versities. 



DR. Johnson io 1 1 \< h \i Miami 

Dr. Robert D. Johnson, '50, has joined 
the faculty in the Department of Eng- 
lish, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. 
Dr. Johnson earned both his master's 
and Ph.D. degrees at the University of 
Missouri. He has been serving as in- 
structor ol English and journalism and 
Director of Student Publications and 
Public Relations at Washburn Univer- 
sity, Topeka, Kansas. 



Ri ( i ivi Am \N( i.n Di i, i' i i s 

The following alumni have recently re- 
ceived advanced degrees: Robert E. 
Edkin, '53, Doctor of Medicine from 
Howard University; William A. Ncal. 
'56, LL.B., William K. Young, '56, 
M.S., Robert B. Montgomery, '55, 
M.D., Henry C. Cooper, '56, M.A., 
Paul G. Stafford, '56, LL.B., all from 
the George Washington University. 

Historians and Historical Societies 

Members of the Department of History 
assumed a leading role in the affairs of 
local, regional and national historical 
societies during the winter. Regional and 
national associations tend to be primar- 
ily professional organizations, and the 
papers offered are highly specialized. 



1 he local societies, however, are com- 
posed almost entirely of laymen, and 
the papers are designed to offer enter- 
tainment, intellectual stimulation, and 
awareness of the meaning of history. 

Professor Aubrey C. Fand. Head of 
the Department ol History. recently 
spoke to the Maryland Society of 
Colonial Wars on the bench and bar 
in early Maryland. Professor Fand also 
presided at the Annual Meeting of the 
County Historical Societies of Mary- 
land, in Baltimore, and at a session 
of the Southern Historical Association, 
in Atlanta. Professor David Sparks 
spoke on the Civil War at the County 
Societies meeting, and also at the An- 
nual Encampment of the Civil War 
Roundtable, in Hagerstown, Professoi 
Pat Riddleberger spoke on certain as- 
pects of the Negro during Reconstruc- 
tion at the Southern Historical Associa- 
tion meeting, and Professor Donald 
Cordon delivered a paper on Australian 
history at the American Historical Asso- 
ciation meeting in Chicago. 

Taking history to a still more gen- 
eral audience, Professor Verne E. Chate- 
laine recently addressed several service- 
fraternal organizations over the State, 
and Professor Paul Conkin spoke over 
Washington radio station WRC on the 
publication of his recent book, Tumor- 
row a New World. 



Why buy 2 when 1 will do? 

COMBINATION 

SAVES WORK • SAVES SPACE 



Just put a load of wash in your combination, set the 
controls and your work is finished . . . you can forget it's 
washday. Your clothes come out thoroughly washed, 
completely rinsed and Huff dried. 

These machines have all the most wanted features choice 
of washing and drying cycles, water and heat temperature 
selectors, lint filters, bleach dispensers and lighted dials. 




Get a free demonstration from your 



APPLIANCE DEALER 



Be sure to ask about the Free Towel Offer! 






26 



the Mary fand Magazine 



kl I IMNl. UP Willi I Ml Al I MM 

Robert W. Beall, '31, who represents 
the Montgomery Count) Club on ttu- 
Alumni Council, served as Chairman ol 
the Montgomery Count] ruberculosis 
and Heart \ssociation Christmas seal 
campaign, 80,000 letters requesting do- 
aations wore sent to count) residents. 

Ubert I, Benjamin, '33, Ims been 
appointed rechnical Service Represen- 
tative for Monsanto Chemical Com 
pan\\ Plastics Division al Springfield, 
Massachusetts. 

Allied J. Northam, '22. has recently 
retired from the Du Pont Company 
alter a career of 36 years in the rubber 
industry. Mr. Northam has had a major 
share in bringing Du Pont's "Hypalon" 
synthetic rubber to its present stage of 
commercial development. 

Edward C. Mehm, '54, has been ap- 
pointed District manager for Raytheon 
Company's Distributor Products Divi- 
sion in Waltham, Massachusetts. 




Mr. Grier 

Charles P. Grier, '54, has been ap- 
pointed to head the Quality Control 
Laboratory in the Dr. Pepper Com- 
pany's headquarters in Dallas, Texas. 

Michael P. Zell, '59, was recently 
graduated from the Officer Candidate 
Course at the Marine Corps Schools, 
Quantico, Virginia. 

A. Robert Hamilton. '50, and George 
M. Preston, '50, have recently assumed 
new duties with the Boy Scouts of Amer- 
ica. Mr. Hamilton is the Director of 
Special Gifts, Greater New York Coun- 
cils, B.S.A.; Mr. Preston is District 
Scout Executive, Baltimore Area Coun- 
cil. 

(Continued on next page) 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Specialists in Residential and 
Commercial Air Conditioning 

Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

CALL US FOR THE NAME OF YOUR 
NEAREST DEALER 

YORK WHOLESALERS, Inc. 

(Wholesale Distributor) 

501 - 15th ST., SOUTH 
OTis 4-3700 Arlington, Va. 



PLANTATION 



ANGUS BULLS 

IMPORTERS - EXPORTERS - 
BREEDERS, of 
Scotch, and Irish Aberdeen-Angus 
Performance Attested Bulls for Sale 
Request Folder, Data Sheets, Prices 
Address: James B. Lingle, Manager 

(Telephone: TAylor 7-2041) 



WYE PLANTATION, Queenstowtt.Md. 



J. I. WELL! 



CREOSOTE D 
PRODUCTS 

— Telephones — 

PI 2-2144— PI 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



THE 

NATIONAL BANK 
OF CAMBRIDGE 

Complete 
Banking Service 

Organized 1880 

SAFETY DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

Cambridge, Maryland 



SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



~2)prina ^MM 
PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE PI 9-5594 



New! Audio Tape 

RECORDED TAPES 

"Hi-Spirits" or 
"Blood and Thunder" 

Each Bonus Package includes 1-7 inch 
1200 ft. Reel tape and 1-7 inch recorded 
reel of Sparkling Classics. 

Either Package at the low intro- 
ductory price of $5.20 each. 

Specify dual or four track. 

WHOLESALE RADIO PARTS CO., Inc. 

311 W. Baltimore St. 

Baltimore 1, Md. 

Tel. MU 5-2134 



March-April, 1960 



27 



s > v 



v v . V V V 



YOU ASKED FOR IT- 
HERE IT IS! 

Effective Immediately 

DIVIDENDS WILL BE PAID 

QUARTERLY 

MAR ||, JUNE 30. SEP1 30. DEC 31 



I on Savings and Investment Accounts 
in 

FRATERNITY 
FEDERAL 

SAVINGS and LOAN ASSN. 
764-770 Washington Blvd. 



Tins 1^ in keeping with FRATER- 
\ 1 1 ) 'S policj ol .//.,..' i giving you the 
l:l SI possiblt in safety, service, profit 
and conveniem 

Since dividends are compounded tlii-- 
gives you an opportunity t" earn ^t il I 
mor< than Fraternity's alreadj IIKiH- 
ER dividends. 



OPEN: Daily 9 to 2 
FRIDAYS 'til 8:30 P.M. 



Bacon for 
breakfast 

jfap you 




Albert F. Goetze, Inc. 

CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore. Md 




Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Sal 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 




Mr. Say lor 

James H. Saylor, '57. recently attend- 
ed a two-week company training session 
in Clifton, New Jersey. Mr. Savior is a 
professional service representative of 
Pfizer laboratories 

CHAPEI (Hoik lo PERFORM W 

Puerto Run 

I he University Chapel Choir. Fague 
Springmann. Conductor, performed in 
Florida during the semester break. In 
June the Choir will sing tour major 
choral works at the Casals Festival in 
Puerto Rico. They will be conducted by 
Pablo Casals. Alexander Schneider and 
Hugh Ross in performances of the 
Brahms German Requiem and Alio 
Rhapsody, the Haydn Seven Last Wordi 
and the Beethoven Choral fantasy. Mr. 
Springmann will be soloist in the 
Requiem. 

The University Madrigal Singers, con- 
ducted by Rose Marie Cirentzer. were 
very active during the month oi Decem- 
ber, making several appearances on tele- 
vision in Baltimore and singing on 
Campus. 

During the same period the Women's 
Chorus and Men's Glee Club, under the 
direction ol Paul Iraver. sang in Balti- 
more at the University Hospital and at 
the new State Office Building for the 
tirst annual tree lighting ceremony held 
lor the Department bv Governor Tawes. 
1 .iter in this semester the groups will 
tour the state, presenting programs at 
several high schools. 

The University Band, directed bv 
Hubert Henderson, made its annual tour 
through the stale, appearing at Flkton. 
Bel Air. Havre de Grace, and Aberdeen, 
among other cities. 

Homer I Inch. Head ol the Music 
Department, has contracted with Har- 



Edward 

Boker 

Frosted 

Foods, 

Inc. 



J at 



SERVING 

HOSPITALS 

AND 

INSTITUTIONS 



LAwrence 6-8350 

1480 OKIE STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 



The gathering place for 
Marylanders of Good Taste 




I DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 
1730 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 

Open 'til Midnight — Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

1 >< >>< ndable >'< rvit • S 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

M km her Federal Dwuuil Ins. Corp. 



28 



thf. Mar viand Magazine 



court-Brace u> write ;i college texl in 
music. ["his will be Mr. Ulrich's sixth 
hook in the field. 

Herbert Henke and Paul Traver, both 
members of the music faculty, are pre- 
senting classes in Dundaik and Annap- 
olis through the University's extension 
program, 

Hubert Henderson, Director oi Uni- 
versity Bands, will appear as conductor 
or adjudicator at several functions dur- 
ing the semester. He will direct the Yale 
Band at a hand directors convention. 
will conduct a hand clinic in Harford 
County; will be a judge at the Virginia 
District Band Festival in Norfolk and 
the All-County Band at Frederick, Md. 



Department of Art News 

Beginning January 28th. the Bader Gal- 
lery in Washington. D. C, featured a 
one-man exhibition of gouaches, draw- 
ings and oils by Herman Maril. This 
exhibit contained new works, with the 
exception of a casein painting. "Inlet," 
which was awarded a prize last Febru- 
ary at the Riverside Museum in New 
York City. 

Professor M aril's work has been ex- 
hibited in most of the museums through- 
out the country, and he is represented 
in many permanent collections, both 
here and abroad. He has had over 
twenty-five one-man shows, the latest 
being last March, in New York City. 

Among the permanent collections in 
which he is represented are: The 
Phillips Gallery. Baltimore Museum of 
Art, Encyclopedia Britannica collection, 
Corcoran Gallery, Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, Peale Museum, Amherst 
College, American University, Bezalel 
Museum in Jerusalem, Howard Univer- 
sity, University of Minnesota, Delaware 
Fine Arts Center, and the Bernstein 
Memorial collection. 

"Low Tide," a painting by Herman 
Maril, was purchased recently by the 
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington. 
D. C. Mr. Maril served on the jury of 
selection and awards for the Irene 
Leache Memorial Exhibition of the 
works of Virginia and North Carolina 
painters. The Exhibition was held at 
the Norfolk Museum, Virginia, in Jan- 
uary. 

The distinguished American water 
colorist, Eliot O'Hara, gave a painting 
demonstration and lecture at the Student 
Union Auditorium on November 25. 
1959. The program, which included re- 
cent films made by Mr. O'Hara, was 
under the sponsorship of the Depart- 
ment of Art. 



FOR ALL YOUR HOMECOMINGS 

r i 1 iiK-^®|^DIPL.OMAT 

^///n\\# 



WASHINGTON'S 1ARGEST 
AND NEWEST MOTOR HOTEL 



Just 10 minutes from the campus at the intersection of 
Bladensburg Road and New York Ave., N.E. 
TV and Bath in every Room . . . Restaurant and Lounge . . . 
Completely Air Conditioned and Heated . . . Swimming 
Pool . . . Individual Parking . . . Valet Service 

Call LAwrence 6-1400 or write Dept. M, Diplomat Motor Hotel, 
Bladensburg Road and New York Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 





Johnston, Lemon & Co. 

MEMBER PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



SOUTHERN BUILDING 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3130 



115 N. ST. ASAPH 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 



Ovet ^ive-atif l/easti, the Place to- Bay 

CHRYSLER PRODUCTS 




lerj 



LOWEST PRICES 
QUALITY SERVICE 

CHRYSLER • PLYMOUTH • IMPERIAL • VALIANT 

Entire 4800 Block Wisconsin Avenue N.W. 



eeierjnc. 



CHRYSLER CITY 



EMERSON 3-4800 



FREE PARKING 



TH0MSS0N STEEL CO., Inc. 

5106 Baltimore Avenue 
HYATTSVILLE. MD. AP 7-3201 



March- April, 1960 



29 



" 



KOESTER'S 
TWINS 

PLEASE 



THE 

E. A. KAESTNER 

COMPANY 

DAIRY & CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

5401 PULASKI HIGHWAY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING 6 OFFSETTING 

SAratogo 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24. Md. 



College of 




BUSINESS 


AND 


PUBLIC 




ADMINISTRATION 



( oi Drapi r Si rvi b as Privati 

Pn hi in i hi Pri sident 

William G. Draper, '43. is what the 
Evening Star recently called a "headline 
personalis 

( ol. Draper's most recent claim to 
fame, according to the Star, is his ser- 
vice as pilot to President Eisenhower on 
the President's recent good will trip t" 
I I nations. 

Serving as the President's pilot is. 
however, not new to Draper, who has 
been personal pilot and Air Force aide 
to Mr. Eisenhower since 1953. 

His interest in flying began in his 
childhood and continued through his 
teens when, at 16, he and a friend or- 
ganized the Silver Spring Aeronauts' 
Club. As a freshman at the University 
of Maryland, he became the only mem- 
ber of his class to qualify for Civil 
Aeronautics Administration training. As 
a sophomore he learned acrobatic flying. 
He served as a pilot in World War II. 
qualifying in several military planes. 

Col. Draper and his wife, Ruth, live 
with their four children in Silver Spring. 

Sugrue Elected to Board 

Bernard A. Sugrue, '34, has been elect- 
ed a member of the Board of Directors 
of the Automobile Trade Association of 
Maryland. Mr. Sugrue, who is President 
of the Norman Motor Company in Col- 
lege Park, will represent both Prince 
Georges and Montgomery Counties' new 
dealer members in associational matters. 

Whereabouts 

Edward G. Knight, '58, has been ap- 
pointed an Assistant Cashier of the 
Dania Bank. Dania, Florida. 

Edward Heymann. '57. has been ap- 
pointed an Assistant Account Executive 
ol the Y.mSant. Dugdale & Company, 
Inc.. Baltimore. Mr. Heymann was 
formerly with the Caterpillar Tractor 
Company in Peoria, Illinois, and the 
\lban Praetor Company in Baltimore. 

Pvt Larry R. Lackey, '59, recently 
completed the final phase of si\ months 
active military training under the Re- 
serve Forces Act program at Fort Bliss. 
I exas. 



Here is how to get 
the EXACT business 
form you need . . . 




CONTINUOUS 
FOIMS 



MANDTSfl 
ONE. TIME 
CAIBON lOIUS 



Many forms are needed 
in business. But (or 
every situation there is 
only one right type of 
form to use. You can be 
sure of getting this one 
form you need by buy- 
ing from a firm that 
offers a complete line. 
Phone or write for 
samples. 

For an unbiased recom- 
mendation, buy from a 
firm with a COMPLETE 
Line. 




'bo« reQwrcd) 



»■•'_ i C IMS 



Baltimore Business Forms 



»ot[ SMfseccx co««f*N» 



Phone CEnter 3-8000 

Talbot (Tol) T. Speer (Class of 1917) 
Charles F. Ellinger (Class of 1937) 



F. A. Davis & Sons 
WHOLESALERS 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 

Kitchen & Dining Equipment 

Soda Fountain Supplies 

119 S. HOWARD STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 

Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION WITHOUT 

OBLIGATION 

4904 WISCONSIN AVE. N.W. 

EM 3-9660 Washington, D. C. 

4701 YORK ROAD 
ID 5-4535 Baltimore, Md. 



WHOLESALE 


STATIONERY 


The 


"Handy" 

Baltimore, Md. 


Line 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



Pvt. Peter R Owinga, s, ». recent!] 
completed training in the duties ol a 
Nike-Ajax guided missile crewman un 
der the Reserve I orces wt program .it 
itic Aii Defense Center, Fori Bliss, 
I exas. 



School of 
DENTISTRY 

Kyrle W. Frets, D.D.S. 



I lit Heatwole Award 

The University of Maryland Class of 
l l >23 has made possible, by voluntary 
contributions from its members, an an- 
nual student award in memory of Dr. 
Timothy O. Heatwole, Class of 1895, 
who passed away on April 28, 1949. 
Funds accumulated to date have been 
deposited in a restricted account of the 
Endowment Fund of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation and further deposits in the Heat- 
wole Memorial Fund will be made when 
additional contributions are received 
from the 1923 graduates. 

In June, 1960, a University of Mary- 
land chair will be awarded a member 
of the graduating class. The dedication, 
which will be read at the time the award 
is made, is as follows: 



In memory of 

Dr. Timothy O. Heatwole (1865-1949) 

Dean, School of Dentistry of the 

University of Maryland 

As practitioner, teacher, and Dean he 
encouraged, developed, guided, and in- 
spired those affiliated with him to high 
professional achievements. His contri- 
butions enriched not only the School of 
Dentistry but the entire University of 
Maryland. The members of the Class of 
1923 of the Dental School, University of 
Maryland, the last class to graduate 
under Dr. Heatwole as Dean, join in 
acknowledging their debt to this out- 
standing scholar, philosopher, humani- 
tarian, public servant and friend. 



Dr. Chan Pong 

The Alumni Association takes this op- 
portunity to congratulate Dr. Bertrand 
O. Chang Pong, 1939, on the recent 
completion of St. Elizabeth Clinic in 

(Continued on next page) 



MARYLAND MEN WHO KNOW 
FASHION... HAVE THEIR CLOTHES 
MADE-TO-MEASURE BY GRUE! 



Enjoy solid comfort in clothes meticulously 
tailored for you. Hundreds of fabrics to 
choose from. 



Sportcoats from . $39.50 

Suits from .... 65.00 



/ 



GRUE 

TAILORING COMPANY, INC. 

501 EAST PRESTON STREET 

1st floor of the Industrial Bldg. 

Baltimore, Md. 

SAratoga 7-8294 



/ 







ARUNDEL FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 



direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 



Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 



53rd ANNIVERSARY — Organized 1906 

I 




PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. ELgin 5-9300 



Since 1935 



ROADS BY 
DRUMMOND & COMPANY, Inc. 

Phone: Circle 2-3030 Race Road, Baltimore 27, Md. 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 



Phone MUlberry 5-6070 



Baltimore 23, Md. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



MU 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS. Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



March- April, 1960 



31 






^ 






-n 

aa 

n 

11 



HIGH DIVIDENDS plus 
INSURED SAFETY 

Vermont 
I e d e r a I 
Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Fayette at Hanover Streets 

Baltimore 3, Maryland 

All accounts insured up to $10,000 00 
by on agency of the United Slatei Gov't 




CARRYOUT SHOPS at 
Cold Spring Lane & loch 

Raven CH 3 5253 

Mon Dow Min Shopping 

Center IA 3-7766 



QYu'> 




Charles St. below 25th 

BE 5 8744 BALTIMORE, MD. 



1 BETHESDA CINDER BLOCK \ 


■ MANUFACTURING 


CO., Inc. ■ 


Complt U Lint 


: 


; M ISONR1 supplies : 


: BRICK - CINDER 


BLOCK j 


; River Rd. at B & O R.R. 


OL 4-1616 I 


I BETHESDA, 


vii). : 



NORTH 
\\ ASHINGTON PRESS 

Inc. 

II ( Specialize in Printing 
for ( burcbei ./>/</ Schools 

849 Upshur St., N. W. 

WASHINGTON 1 1 , D. C. 

TAylor 9 3932 



the Port-of-Spain, I rinidad. I his mod- 
em, three-story, eighteen-room hospital, 
which accommodates 26 patients, is the 
result ol the planning and sponsoring "I 
.i group i>i four medical and two dental 

specialists, including Dr. ( hang Pont! 
whose life's ambition, it is reported by 

a rrinidad newspaper, is realized b\ 

the activation ol an ultra-modern, tully- 
st.illed hospital in the British West 
Indies 

I Ins loyal alumnus was graduated 

Magna ( urn I aude, was admitted to 
membership in Omicron Kappa (Jpsilon 
fraternity, and was the recipient of the 
Harr\ I Kelse\ Award lor protessional 
demeanor. 

With his charming wile. Anne, a sis- 
ter ol the newl) appointed first native 
Governor of Trinidad and Tobago. Mr. 

Solomon Hochoy, Dr. Chan Pong at- 
tended last June, the reunion ol the 
1939 class. 

Our heartiest wishes lor happiness 
and success go across the miles to Ber- 
trand, his w ife ami familv . 



Rhode Isi and At lmni Section Meets 

I he Rhode Island Alumni Section held 
its annual meeting on Monday. January 
18th, at the Biltmore Hotel in Provi- 
dence. Rhode Island, in conjunction 
with the Rhode Island State Dental Con- 
vention. It was a most successful meet- 
ing with forty-six graduates in attend- 
ance. 

There was a cocktail party, banquet 
and business meeting. It was unfortu- 
nate that the evening was marred by 
bad weather which forced many grad- 
uates to cancel their reser\ations because 
of hazardous driving conditions. Some 
oi the newer members were in attend- 
ance which is a good sign for the future 
oi the organization. 

The social committee under the able 
leadership of Albert C. Picozze, '49. 
turned m a lirst rate job in preparation 
lor the meeting. Main other loyal and 
devoted alumni such as Edgar L. Bes- 
sette. '32, William D'Abbraccio, '47. 
Ferdinand Ashcidla. '47. and Charles 
Heaton. '34, should be congratulated for 
the part the\ played in organizing the 
meeting As usual, under the able lead- 
ership of Edward Morin. '20, and 
w illiam Decesare, '36, the section 

seemed to be moving forward. 

Dr. Morin presented the new banner 
ol the section which he had designed 
lot this occasion. It was very similar to 
the Official banner ol the parent organ- 
ization. 



■ 

The Asphalt Service Co. \ 

Inc. 

1836 Chesapeake Ave. 
Elgin 5-1560-61 

BALTIMORE 26, MD. 



s 


T 1 II L 1 \ i . 

P It O CESS 




BOOKBINDING 


Every 


Type For Every Purpose 


A Com 


alete Printers Finishing Service 




9401 Baltimore Blvd. 




WE 5-6884 




COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



BRIGGS 

Construction Co., Inc. 

CUSTOM HOMES 

Repairs - Remodeling 

BETHESDA, MD. OL 6-4545 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGN 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D C 



i H i Maryland Magazim 



["he Presidenl introduced manj past- 
presidents of the Rhode island State 

Denial Association who arc alumni of 

the school. Among the introductions, he 
presented the new President of the 
Rhode Island State Dental Association. 
Dr. William F. Dcccsarc. who serves the 

section as its secretary. He read a tele 

gram from the oldest li\mg graduate ol 

our school. Dr. E. A. Charhonnel. who 
was unable to he present because Of ill- 
ness. Another old graduate who hon- 
ored the section with his presence was 
Dr. Henry A. Martin. '05, of Newport. 
Rhode Island. A special guest. Dr. 
James E. Colgan, President of the 
Dental Alumni of Tufts Dental College, 
was introduced to the group. 

The highlight of the evening was the 
presentation of the Distinguished Alum- 
ni Award of the Rhode Island Section 
to Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio, '46. A 
number of congratulatory telegrams 
were read. 

The final order of business was the 
election of officers for 1960 — Edward 
C. Morin. '20. President; Eric Waxberg, 
'19. 1st Vice-President; Edward A. 
Lynaugh. 15, 2nd Vice-President; Wil- 
liam F. Decesare, '36, Secretary; Charles 
E. Heaton, '34, Treasurer; Eugene M. 
Nelson, '45, Historian; A. James Ker- 
shaw. '32, Editor. 

The officers and council of the 
Alumni Association congratulate the 
section for its successful year and wish 
them continued success in the future. 



Irving W. Eichenbaum 

The Alumni Association is proud to 
bring to your attention the fact that Dr. 
Irving W. Eichenbaum, '39, is currently 
serving as President of the Connecticut 
State Dental Association. Our best 
wishes to Irving and his good wife, 
Naomi, who is also an honored grad- 
uate of the oldest dental school in the 
world. 



Recognition for Norman 

L. NlEDENTOHL 

A "thank you gathering" was held at 
the Children's Hospital to honor Dr. 
Norman L. Niedentohl, '13, who has 
given free dental care to the patients 
there for more than 32 years. The Alum- 
ni Association also wishes to express its 
appreciation to Dr. Niedentohl. 

(Continued on page 37) 



YORK BUILDING PRODUCTS CO. 

Inc. 

Manufacturers of 
Superior Concrete Masonry Units 



Phone York 8-2818 



NORMAN S. 

EARLEY & SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 



Plants 



Homes 



Stores 



Public Buildings 

435 E. BALTIMORE ST. 
Hagerstown, Maryland 

- CLASS 1947 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 


Distributors 


Shell Petroleum Products 


Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 


FREDERICK. MD. 



^ R ] 



HOTEL 



'PLY CO. 



EST. 



Purveyors of Flno ^27 

MEATS • POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotels. 

Institutions, Ships 

Clubs. Etc 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 

BALTIMORE. MD. 



York, Pa. 




FEEDS 

SEEDS 

FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



I Feed MO 3-3113 

FREDERICK 

/ Petroleum MO 3-5422 
THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 
A Maryland Institution 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

Every kind of Insurance 

110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



March- April, 1960 



33 



Maryland's 
largest 

and oldest 
furrier 




Fabulous selection of 

MINK STOLES 

from $199 

225 N. Howard St., Baltimore 

Prices plus tax 
Furs labeled country of origin 



su i ■> I urn Oodi n 
Spring means: planning vacations. 

Spring means: ( ountrvsidc limes to 

charming Inns. 

Spring inc. ms A ■jooi.i deed tor the 
day bj \ isitmg a "stmt in." 

On a countryside drive we dined at 
Olnej Inn. one ol Maryland's distinc- 
tive COUntrj dining places I ocated in 
one ol the most beautiful areas ol 
Montgomery (omits. Olney Inn is 
perched high atop a hill which com- 
mands a breathtaking view ol the 
Maryland countryside. 

The original Olney Inn had a modest 
beginning in 1926 — three tables in one 
small timing room. Before that it was 

an old farm home, built over 125 years 

ago. where every hand-hewn timber was 
a whole tree cut Irom the beautiful 
gro\e that still shelters the wide lawn. 
The Inn today is manv times its orig- 
inal si/e. brimming with modern con- 
veniences, yet it still retains the elegant 
charm of a Maryland plantation. ()lne> 
Inn is under the personal supervision 
of its owner. Ciertrude Allison Brew- 
ster, who is a charming hostess. She 
welcomes large and small groups for 
luncheon, cocktails or dinner and her 
guests travel for miles to partake of 



4fe* 



XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXJ 
X 

A LITTLE BIT OF NORWAY 
IN MARYLAND 

BERTHA L. K.MDTSEN'S GIFT SHOP 

• Hand made decorative Sweaters and Socks for the Collegian and Sportsman 
• Seal Skin Ski Shoes 

• China and fine Glassware from Norway 

• Native dolls in hand made costumes 



X EVNA ROAD, PARKTON, MD. 



Tel.: FLanders 7-5519 



drive nortl the Harrisburg Expressway to Route 137, turn V 

ritrht to Ml ' ii'M.I road, then left anil drive 2 miles to Evna Road, make a ri^nt turn and ride }{ 
ind the mailbooi "ill -l>"« the name Knudtsen, turn rik'ht. x 

CXXXXXXXXXXJ? 



PRING 6E0RGR I-INE5T MtN'5 WEAR JTORE 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 

Dobbs Hats • Bosronian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

UNion 4-1312 



M<M4flawdl 



her hospitality. 

( lubs find the Inn an ideal place for 
meetings. In spring and summer infor- 
mal gatherings on the patio or on the 
spacious lawn allow time for a friendly 
chat over a glass of punch or a cocktail. 
In fall and w inter there is the warmth 
of meeting friends in the atmosphere 
ol pleasant rooms, each with a glowing 
lire in the fireplace. 

Olney Inn is famous for its fine foods 
and has its finger on the nation's palate 
— a long time favorite with Republicans 
and Democrats alike of the Capital city, 
who forget their differences while din- 
ing at Olney Inn. 

Drive out Route 97 one day soon and 
enjoy Olney Inn's hospitality — you'll be 
glad that you did. 

* * * 

Our good deed for the day was a 
trip to Shaffer's Convalescent Retreat 
in Ellicott City, Maryland, to visit a 
"shut in" and to chat with some of the 
bedridden patients who love having 
company. 

The Shaffer Convalescent Retreat is 
a beautiful colonial mansion in the 
center of a knoll overlooking ten acres 
of lawn. There are towering shade trees 
and landscaped gardens, which symbol- 
izes peace and tranquility. 

v\ e chatted with the staff, which is 
composed of experienced registered and 
trained nurses, carefully selected for 
their kind and sympathetic manner to- 
ward the patients who come under their 
care. 

Mr. Martin W. Shaffer is the owner 
and manager of the Retreat and he 
escorted us on a tour of the building, 
which is a stucco on granite fireproof 
structure. The spacious oak-paneled 
recreation room, extending beyond the 
reception hall, was occupied by a group 
of patients enjoying a television pro- 
gram. They were seated in large com- 
fortable chairs in a homey atmosphere 
which suggested contentment. 

The stairway leading to the upper 
floors is extra w ide. providing ample 
passage room. On the second floor there 
were porches for the patients, with large 
armchairs for their comfort. Many of 
the rooms have adjoining bath and all 
have running water. There are private 
and semi-private rooms as well as large, 
well-equipped wards. 






the Ma ryland Magazine 



Wi 



amen 



The meals are all served in the pa- 
tients' rooms and Mrs. Martin Shaffer 
personal!) supervises the kitchen and 
the food. Ml diets arc carefully adhered 

to and the food is prepared in an im- 
maculately clean, bright stainless steel 
kitchen, which includes its own ice- 
making machine. 

The Retreat is oil Route 2 C > on Mont- 
gomery Road and is easily accessible to 
patients of the greater Baltimore and 
\\ ashington areas. 



I nroute to Hong Kong the lour will 
again enter lokso lor a three -da\ excil 
mg stay. Among the sights will be a visit 
to the Imperial Palace Cnn/a. "The 
Fifth Avenue ol lokso" Nehonbashs' 

Bridge, Marunouchi, I he Meiju Shi inc. 
I he Museums. Tokyo University and 

(he /oo. 

In Hong Kong the busy harbor will 
be visited as well as the beautiful bays 
and magnificent swimming beaches, and 
Victoria Peak, towering over this island 
city. There will be three packed-lull 
days in Hong Kong and on April 26th 
the party will arrive in Macao, which 
is a Portuguese Colony 40 miles from 
Hong Kong by sea. This was the first 
East-West trading post with China. 

(Continued on next pat;e) 





AT STEIN'S 








m 




iifni 
ws 
time. 




Tins well designed populai Pembroke, 
>l solid mahogany, is just one "i ;i large 
issortment oi occasional tables now <>n 
>ur floors. Reasonably priced ;u$54.00 

WM. P. STEIN, INC. 

401 N. CHARLES at Mulberry 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



We called on World-Wide Travel 
Service Corporation and talked to the 
president of the firm. Mr. Kenneth H. 
Carter, who was busily completing ar- 
rangements for a tour to the Far East, 
geared to the Osaka Trade Fair. This 
particular tour should be a fabulous 
experience for those fortunate enough 
to be included. The Far East Trade 
Promotion Tour will start on April 8th 
and extend through May 8th, 1960 — 
and this year there will be a bonus 
attraction as in Osaka at the time of 
the tour the third annual Osaka Inter- 
national Music Festival will be held. 

The tour party will convene in 
Seattle, Washington, at the Hotel Olym- 
pic. Before departure there will be a 
get-together where the members of the 
tour will meet and become acquainted. 

They will board a Japan Airline:, 
flight just before midnight, arriving in 
Tokyo before noon the following morn- 
ing. The day is free for sightseeing 
and the following morning a flight is 
scheduled for Osaka, where the tour 
will visit for five days. Guests will be 
entertained by the City officials and the 
Osaka Fair Board. Osaka is Japan's sec- 
ond largest city and it is a thriving 
industrial center where busy streets in- 
terlace with many canals, emptying into 
the Bay of Osaka. 

A stop is scheduled in Tokyo on the 
way to Nikko, where the Tour will enjoy 
two days of sightseeing. Here they will 
see the tradition of Japanese harmony 
between nature and art at its height in 
vast Nikko National Park. There will 
be a trip to Toshgu Shrine, one of the 
greatest examples of Japanese architec- 
ture — and a trip to Mt. Nantai and the 
famous Kigon Falls, Japan's most 
famous cataract. 



CONVALESCENT RETREAT 

Situated on a knoll in the center of a 10-acre lawn, 
beautiful shade trees and landscape grounds 

ELLICOTT CITY, MARYLAND 

25 minutes to downtown Baltimore — 30 miles to Washington 

Phone Ellicott Citv 206 




Good-bye Campus — Hello EUROPE! 

The greatest Summer Vacation — see the old world, its culture and 
charm, its cities packed with history and architecture, and its 
wonderful opportunities for having FUN. (If you took French, 
try it out — but the Tour Escort handles everything, sees you get 
to the places you yearn to visit. ) 

Brownell College Tours and Popular Tours 

College Tours for ages 18 to 30. Popular Tours have no age limits 
yet many students go along. Choice hotels, 3 meals a day. Frequent 
departures by Sea and by Air. 45 to 66 days. From about $1200, 

inclusive. _ _ , . 

Expansive Travel — Inexpensive 

Passion Play at Oberammergau (tickets included), Holland, Bel- 
gium, England, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Austria, and France. 
Many tours include Scandanavia, some take in Spain, a few to 
Greece, some to Olympic Games. 

Wo-ild Wide *J*auel £eloice Co>ip. 

MERCURY BUILDING, 20th & K Sts. N.W. 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. Phone: FEderal 3-9373 



March- April, 1960 



35 




BLACKIE 



1217- 22nd STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



« 



osi 



IHIOI '111 




• TCRLINC 

• •• I 1 00O 



Ocno 

Vt\ j'fi j"J .M»lfrs 




ompanu inc. 



^Icrlina Uih'erwarv 
Qjrle»*» Pleas.nl Sis 13 JKmore-l.Md 



CAe Shade Shop 

and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Street, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FEderal 71200 

Manufacturers and Distributors 

if Window Shades 

if Venetian Blinds 

if Folding Doors 

if Draperies and Rods 

if Screens 

if Inside Shutters 

if Porch Shades 

if Vertical Blinds 

if Decorative Wood Coverings 



Afa^JaHci Women 



I hen. itn to Manila tor lour dass' 
visit I Ik- lour will be lodged at the 
famous Manila Hotel Honolulu will be 
the final stop, where the parts vmII have 
three days to bask in the sun at Waikiki 
Beach before leaving tor Los Angeles. 
arriving Sunday, Mas Xth. 

What a wonderful experience and 
World-Wide Iras el has mans, mans 
more exciting tours to choose Ironi . . . 
call them for information — they'll be 
happs to help sou. 



No more problems sshen Mom and 
Dad ssant to leave on a trip these dass. 
Ihcs can call the Elizabeth Cooney 
Personnel Service and Miss ( oones ssill 
arrange to ha\e an experienced person 
well-trained in handling children to take 
oser for a das - a sseek - a month -or 
even longer - and no need to fret or 
ssorry. 

A most unusual personality ssorking 
in a most unusual capacity is a Mis 
souri-born Baltimorean by the name of 
Elizabeth Miller Cooney, sshose affec- 
tionate tics ssith her birthplace. Jefferson 
(its. have been supplanted by intimate 
connections ssith the Monument City. 

Self-employed Elizabeth Cooney. a 
graduate of Notre Dame of Mars land. 
is a vivacious brunette sshose startling 
success in business can be attributed to 
a sibrant charm sshich quickly endears 
her to those ssith sshoni she comes in 
contact Osersshelming initiative and a 
deep belief in the operation sshich she 
heads has resulted in success in onls 
tsso short sears. 

The firm's objectives are to furnish 



companions, practical nurses and super- 
sisors along ssith the babs sitters. 

Numerous calls are receised tor su- 
pers isory personnel to take over the 
running ot a home and the care ot the 
children sshen the ossners are ass as on 
business or vacation. This mas entail 
daily duty or indefinite duty, depending 
upon the client's need. Mans steads 
clients of Elizabeth ( oones are thus 
able to enjoy shosss in Ness York C its 
or the sands of Nassau ssith no ssorry 
about the situation at home, sshich is 
in the competent hands of the super- 
sisor. In this manner, the routine of the 
home is followed as closely as possible 
ssith little disruption to schedule in the 
ossners absence. 

Under its present organization, the 
Agency provides practical nurses and 
nurses aid care in the hospital and. it 
the need is such that help is required 
sshen a soung mother brings a ness 
baby home from the hospital, a mater- 
nits practical nurse responds to the call. 
Companions are asailahle for the ailing, 
the elderly and the alone, filling in on 
nights sshen families find it impossible 
to be present. 

Despite the constant ring of the tele- 
phone. Elizabeth (oones rinds time to 
relax ssith her young daughter. Eileen. 
a senior in high school. Both are as id 
sports enthusiasts and share a mutual 
lose o\ sss miming, sailing, badminton 
and riding. Elizabeth C oones is a 
staunch supporter of the Baltimore 
Symphony and the Baltimore Art Mu- 
seum and participates active!) in civic 
affairs, the most recent oi sshich ssere 
the Polio and Cancer drises. 



& 



"Washington's Best Restaurant" 

Holidjs Wjgaziiii ■< nh Consomme Ycarl 

"One of America's Ten Best" 

Katioml Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

Whin Statesmen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 

Irt.tm thr Washington & Willoid Hotels 



Telephone Dl. 7-6467 

Five Beautifully Appointed Rooms Ceterinq To Parties. Me 

E«teblished For Over 100 Years 



4> 



atinq 10 To 250 Persons. 



36 



THE Maryland Magazine 



School of 

DENTISTRY 

i ( 'ontinued from page 1 i • 



I i i i ill) 

\i a recent meeting of the Maryland 

Seel ion of the American College ol 
Dentists, Dr. Max K. Baklor, '!(■>. was 
elected chairman ami Dr. Irving Abram- 
SOn, "32. secretary-treasurer. Governor 
Millard Tawes spoke of future plans for 
the University of Maryland. 



Svt van Sham In i ri<i s 

On January I 1 ). I960, Dr. Sylvan Shane. 
'43, chief of anesthesiology at Doctor's 
Hospital, Baltimore, lectured to the 
Sisterhood of the Woodmoor Hebrew 
Congregation on the topic, "An Inside 
Look at Soviet Russia." 



College of 

EDUCATION 

Joan Bookout 



Dorothy Zeller Heads AF 
Nurse Corps 

Lt. Colonel Dorothy N. Zeller, who re- 
ceived a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Nursing Education in 1952, has been 
named Chief of the United States Air 
Force Nurse Corps. 

A 1935 graduate of the Philadelphia 
General Hospital School of Nursing, Lt. 
Colonel Zeller has been on continuous 
active duty for 23 years. Her first assign- 
ment was to Walter Reed Army General 
Hospital in Washington, D. C. 

In 1952, Lt. Colonel Zeller was as- 
signed to the Office of the Surgeon Gen- 
eral, Hq USAF, as Air Force Nurse 
Corps procurement officer and one year 
later was named Deputy Chief of the 
Air Force Nurse Corps. 

In 1956 Lt. Colonel Zeller was as- 
signed as Chief Nurse at the USAF 
Hospital, Parks Air Force Base. Cali- 
fornia, and the following year she be- 
came Chief Nurse of the Alaskan Air 
Command. In January, 1959, she was 
again named Deputy Chief of the Air 
Force Nurse Corps. 

She is a member of the American 
Nurses Association, the National League 

(Continued on next page) 



CATERING 

---\\ ill. A SPEC I \l Touch 



Party Perk ups for Any Occasion or 
Fully Serviced Affairs 



COCKTAIL PARTIES 



OPEN HOUSE 



RECEPTIONS 



BUFFETS 



TEAS 



PICNICS 



LUNCHEONS 



BANQUETS 




the Casual Gat&tiHXj, service 

7651 Old Georgetown Road BETHESDA, MD. 

Oliver 6-1533-4 



oA 'Well Qlressed £Man 


H&ears a 


Wat 


SOUTHCOMB H 

MEN'S HATS CS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 
Stetson Ties 
109 E. BALTIMORE STREET LExington 
BALTIMORE, MD. 


9-5799 



ELIZABETH COONEY 

PERSONNEL AGENCY 

Town & Country Service 

Practical Nurses, Maternity and Convalescent Care 
Baby Sitters & Companions, Day and Evening Appointments 
I \l " Supervisors, Week-ends and Vacations 

1511 PENTRIDGE ROAD HO 7-8435 

BALTIMORE, MD. TU 9-4772 




VISIT 

Bernie Lee's 

PENN HOTEL 

(Newly renovated) 

OPEN DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 a.m. 
serving 

BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

5 — Spacious Banquet Rooms 
Call VA 3-0300 for reservation 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
PACKAGE GOODS 

15 W. Penn. Avenue 
TOWSON, MARYLAND 

FREE PARKING 



UNIVERSAL ELECTRO 
PLATING COMPANY, Inc. 

In Old Georgetown Since 1929 

SPECIALIST 
in 

ANTIQUE 
SILVER 

Copper and Brass Restoration 
Quality Work — Prompt Service 

Hours: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. doily 

9 a.m. to I p.m. Saturday 

('A block Below M St. N.W.I 

1067 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 
FE 3-2460 Washington, D. C. 




March- April, 1960 



37 



f^ttrif '.i l<l i ' A i rtoomi 

I i, /(lit Si. in ( nillllilf sitli 

Olney inn 

<XNIt,./MD. \^ 

"Old Plantation Recipes" 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 

a v., ted Monday > 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

BRIDGE PARTIES. WEDDINGS. 

BANQUETS. CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

AmpU Parking Space — 
PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

.■ Dl \l l ISON Bri VVSTER, 



Jfullcr & b'Slbcrt 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 
EVERV 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 
Sine. 1920 



Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 





• j* ftXf*^*^ 


f) . In/fl 


\$p&^ 


JLriM 




PW^F* 


SALES 


/ l\s^*^ 


INSURANCE 


PROPERTY 


MANAGEMENT 


\. 


" 


WArfleld ' 


'1010 l 7-0321 


6037 Bolti 


more Boulevard 


RIVERDALE, MD. 



i Nursing, the Graduate Nurses Asso- 
ciation ol l) ( . and the Alumni Asso- 
ciation ol Philadelphia General tins- 
pita! 



Si i<\ k I NEWS 

Preston M Phenix, '59, was recently 
graduated from the 25th Officer ( andi- 

date ( ourse .it Ihc Marine ( orps 
Schools, QuantlCO, \ irginia. 



Ism si ki\i I in ( \i ion Hoi ds 
OPl N Hot si 

The Annual Open House ot the Indus- 
trial Education Department was held 
\lareh IV. I960. I his \ ear's event fea- 
tured the new wind tunnel, the televi- 
sion projeets as well as a wide range ot 
student activities and products. 

Rohert Buxton has recently complet- 
ed all requirements lor the Doctor of 
Education degree with a major in In- 
dustrial Education. Mr. Buxton is Pro- 
fessor of Industrial Education at the 
I .i-t Tennessee State ( ollege at Johnson 
( itv . Tennessee. 

Dr. Donald Males. Protessor and 
Head of the Industrial Education De- 
partment, is serving as a consultant to 
the faculty o! the Maryland State Col- 
lege. Division of the University ot 
Maryland, at Princess Anne. A series 
of workshops are being held dealing 
with the effective use of instructional 
aids. 

Paul Manchak, Graduate Assistant in 
Industrial Education. was reccnth 
awarded the lota Lambda Sigma Grand 
Chapter Scholarship. Mr. Manchak is 
the first person to receive this award. 
I he scholarship was granted Mr. Man- 
chak tor his outstanding paper. "Auto- 
mation and Its Implications for Indus- 
trial Education." 



College of 

ENGINEERING 



R M. Rivcllo 



BA< Ml \l s \PP0IN I 1 I) 

Mr \l Backhauls. ( 1 '38, was recently 
appointed Director o\ the Department 
ol Public Improvement ot the State ot 
Maryland. Mr Backhaus, who was for- 
merlv Deputy Director ol Public Works 
tor the City ot Baltimore, is also Presi- 



Clifton D. Mayhew, 
Inc. 

Painting cs Decorating 
Contractors 







3 06 Lee Highway 
JAckson 5-6131 

Arlington, Va. 



£e^oi*ta iiudenti. and 

abumu o^ the 

llniaeiiUif. o^ 

Ma-uflcutd 

35 Ife&U 

LUSTIilE niCHOLSOn 

Gltzosi&let 
@UUm,o.ULt 

pkd liaise . . . 
bead ol Itatlt a»npa*u&i 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



PURE 

Meat Products 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 



n 



T H E 



Waryi \ \ n Magazin e 



dent of the Baltimore Chapter of the 
Maryland Society of Professional I ngi 
neers. Another Maryland graduate, Mi 
\ithur Van Reuth, C.E. '34, is Secre- 
tary of the Baltimore Chapter. 



Dingm vn Elected V.P. oi 

\ I v\n I . 

Mr James I Dingman, 1.1'. '21. lias 
been elected Vice President of the 
American relephone and Telegraph Co.. 
and appointed Chief Engineer of the 
company, effective December 1st. Mr. 
Dingman has been Director of Opera- 
lions of A. T. and TVs long Lines 
Department lor the last three years. He 
began his career with the Bell System 
in Baltimore as an equipment installer 
lor the Western Electric Co. following 
graduation. Two \ears later he joined 
A. T. and T's long Lines Department 
as an equipment attendant. By D37 he 
was division plant superintendent. He 
has served as Vice President of the Bell 
Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania and as 
Vice President and General Manager of 
the Bell Telephone Laboratories. 



Dr. Ludford and Dr. Reed of 
Faculty Honored 

Two members of the College of Engi- 
neering Faculty have been honored for 
their outstanding contributions to engi- 
neering. Dr. Geoffry Ludford. Professor 
of Aeronautical Engineering, received 
one of the five I960 Awards for Scien- 
tific Achievement given by the Wash- 
ington Academy of Sciences. He was 
presented with the award at a dinner on 
January 21st and was cited "For im- 
portant contributions to fluid flow 
involving viscous, compressible, and hy- 
dromagnetic effects." Another member 
of the Aeronautical Engineering Depart- 
ment, Dr. S. F. Shen. received a similar 
award in 1959 for contributions to the 
field of theoretical aerodynamics. 

Dr. Henry R. Reed, Professor of Elec- 
trical Engineering, has been named a 
Fellow in the Institute of Radio Engi- 
neers. Dr. Reed, who was honored for 
his contributions to engineering educa- 
tion, is one of sixteen radio engineers 
and scientists who recently attained the 
grade of fellow, the highest level of 
membership bestowed by the IRE. He 
is the author or co-author of seven text- 
books in electrical engineering and nu- 
merous publications in engineering 
journals. The Fellow award was effec- 

(Continued on next page) 



STRONG 

as the strongest . . . 



as the safest . . . 

Dividends, computed at 4% per 
annum, paid quarterly on savings. 
79th year of prudent 
management. 



PERPETUAL 

BUILIHIVG ASSOCIATION 

Main Office: 11th and E Sts., N. W. 



Other offices conveniently located in 
Bethesda, Silver Spring and Prince Georges. 

"Washington's $300 Million 
Insured Savings Institution" 




We 
DEVELOP LAND 

for 

its 
HIGHEST, BEST 

and most 
PROFITABLE USE 

for 
LAND OWNERS 

and 
INVESTORS 

HARRY A. BOSWELL CO., 

Inc. 

REALTORS 
3718 Rhode Island Avenue 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 
AP. 7-1 111 



Ottenberg's Bakers. 

Inc. 

Quality Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 
INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



? V\0^ 



.i«»^f*, 



to** 



i»o* 1 



«nw 






\\\v>. 






March-April, 1960 



39 



HARVEY DAIRY 

BRENTWOOD, Ml). 

SERVING PRINCE GEORGES 
ond MONTGOMERY COUNTIES 

your Neighbors 
Buy Our Milk 



• Vitamin D Homogenized Milk 

• Grade A Pasteurized Milk 

• Eitro Rich Homogenized 
Vitamin Milk 

• Cultured Buttermilk 

• Fat Free Milk 

• Chocolate Milk 

• Butter-Sweet Cream 

• Cottage Cheese 

• Eggs — Strictly Fresh 

• Holf and Half 

• Sour Cream 

• Table Cream 

• Whipping Cream 

• Margarine 

• Fresh Orange Juice 



APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 



CHEZ ALBERT 

I I\l \l I Rl \( II FOODS 

6470 ADDISON ROAD. S.E. 

\\ uhington 27, D. C. 

RJSdwood 5-8325 

Proprietor — Albert Bo* 



MIIllllllllllllllllllll 

Bon Ton 

SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON SARATOGA 
CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 
«eor— 1729 D St . S E 
II 3 4848 Washington 




live January 1st and the recipients oi 

the award, \sho represent the I nited 

States and si\ other countries, will be 
honored in March al the annual hanquet 

Ol the IRI in New York. 



I)l< Sill s Sl-I \KS \l I \S 

I )i S I Shen. Professor Ol Aeronau- 
tical Engineering, presented a paper at 

the Annual Meeting ol the Institute ol 
the Aeronautical Sciences m New York 
(it>. I he subject ol his paper was 
"Some ( onsaierations ol the Laminar 
Stability of Incompressible Time-de- 
pendent Basic Flows." Dr. Shen serves 
.is a consultant to the I s Naval 
Ordnance laboratory 



Win ki kjBot is 

George W. Scott. M.H. '52, has been 
appointed stair engineer in Advanced 
Development at the Owego facilit) ->t 
IBM's Federal Systems Division. 




*» ^* 




\fr. Scott 

Mr J. A. Bruce Piney, E.E. '51. is 
now Assistant Chief Engineer of the 
Alan Wood Steel Company of Consho- 
hocken, l'a 

Dr. Raymond R. Bouche, M.S. '54 
and Ph.D. in '59 in Mechanical Engi- 
neering, has been appointed manager. 
Standards and Analysis Department. 
Endevco Corp. Dr. Bouche. an authority 
Oil the calibration ol vibration instru- 
mentation, will be responsible for trans- 
ducer and electronics test procedures, 
maintaining electrical-mechanical stand- 
ards and design of special test equip- 



— — ■ — 




IV I 1 1 M {'}'?! 




ErPAINTSl 




sit '-o\ j/f 




frtf? PAINT IS 




r >V\v Y0UR BEST 

im jU AID TO HOME 




fjUj ^BEAUTY! 








)Y&> cost so 
& lifnMe more! 








Visit any of these 




WINSLOW STORES 




• 977 New York Ave.. NW NA. 8-8610 

• 3754 Minn. Ave.. N E IU. 1-67S6 

• S418 Queens Chapel Rd Hyatts 

WA 7-7777 

• 7514 Wise Ave , Beth , Md OL 4-4160 

• 8211 Go Ave , S. S , Md. JU. 9-2284 

• 5307 Bolto. Ave , Hyatts., Md 

WA 7-1180 

• 3211 10th St.. N., Arl., Vo. JA 5-7878 

• 1239 Wisconsin Ave., NW. FE 3-7667 

• 500 Hungerford Drive, 

Rockville, Md. GA 4 8555 




• FREE PARKING 







PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



Kefauvcr Lumber 
Company, Inc. 

LUMBER, MILL WORK, 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 

BRICK and BLOCKS 

Phone: Jorrettsville 4601, Bel Air 874 
Bel Air Yds. - phone 1777 -Bel Air, Md. 

FOREST HILL. MD 



40 



THE M.\ R V I A ND M \(. \ZINE 



ment. Prior to taking luv new post be 
was with the Nation. il Bureau ol Stand- 
ards, Washington, D. (".. for nine years, 
working in the field ol shock and vibra 
Hon measurement and is recognized for 
his wide range of technical papers pub- 
lished m the past several years. 

Captain Gladstone S. lewis. Jr.. 
USAF, has been assigned as Project 
Officer in the Re-1 ntr\ Vehicle Devel- 
opment Directorate of Air Force Ballis- 
tie Missile Division. Captain lewis also 
holds a master's degree from the Uni- 
versit) of Michigan. The Air Force 
Ballistic Missile Division manages and 
direets the research and development of 
the Air Force's Titan. Atlas, Thor and 
Minutenian weapon systems, a project 
of highest national priority. 



Firmin Heads Baptist Group 

John M. Firmin, '36, was elected Presi- 
dent of the District of Columbia Baptist 
Convention at the 83rd annual session 
November 17. 

Mr. Firmin, who is a member of Beth- 
any Baptist Church in the District, suc- 
ceeds the Reverend S. Lewis Morgan, 
Jr.. pastor of Pentworth-Montgomery 
Hills Baptist Church. 

Mr. Firmin is a construction engineer 
by profession. 



School of 

LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



Hegarty to Head New Section 

Another Law School graduate has as- 
sumed a post within the legal structure 
of Baltimore City. 

He is William A. Hegarty, '53, and 
he has been appointed Chief Assistant 
City Solicitor. In this capacity he will 
head the new trial section of the City's 
Law Department. 

A member of the law firm cf 
O'Doherty, Gallagher and Hegarty, Mr. 
Hegarty now takes on the additional 
responsibility of supervising all trial 
work by various attorneys in the Law 
Department. He plans to conduct a 
training program in trial work for 
members of the Department with an 
eye to discontinuing the hiring of private 
law firms to handle some condemnation 
cases. 



BARBER & ROSS CO 

EST. 1876 

2323 - 4th St. N. E. Washington, D. C. 

DEcatur 2-0501 



FREE DELIVERY 



FREE PARKING 



SUPPLIER & DISTRIBUTOR Of THESE MAJOR ITEMS 

Builders Hardware — Power Tools — Package Homes 

Major Appliances — Structural Steel — Lumber 

Jalousie Doors — Aluminum Windows — Millwork 

Paint — General Hardware — Kitchen Cabinets 

Metal Bucks & Doors 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 
6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







r~ 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Druggist 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHEONS 



CHARCOAL' 



2637 Conn. Ave. N.W.. Washington, D. C. 



TOWER 9-6204r 



RESTORFF MOTORS 

Sales /V Ci -4- J rf' Service 

7323 BALTIMORE BLVD. • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK, M0. 



JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading as 

KIERNANS 

A Complete Line of Beverages 
8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



March-April, 1960 



41 



~N 




&..,r 



L Jioto Lm 



j 



or 2- retinnns 



>inr<i\iiH|< 



— C <»Talo<L 



d J\ )n(\az 



IHCS 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501 509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



MARYLAND CHIEF 

TOMATOES 




Packed 
By 

J. LANGRALL & BRO. INC. 

CANNERS SINCE 1878 



• • 



in Baltimore 
it's the 



for banquets 

parties 

special meetings 



STAFFORD HOTEL 

Visit Our New Mt. Vernon Bar 

CHARLES & MADISON 

BALTIMORE 1, MD. ^^ 

MUlberry 5-0990 







\ 1 < \ / \ R 




: CATHEDRAL and MADISON 


sts. : 


I Phone VErnon 7-8400 




J Boltimorc. Md. 

■ 









School of 

MI.DICINH 



l>: Julm li agner 



Al l MM Nulls 

i)i Abraham S. Rothberg, '26, was re- 
centl) appointed attending orthopedic 

surgeon at the Hume and Hospital ot 
the Daughters ot Israel in New York 
City. 

Dr. Ralph R. Palumho. '58, recentl\ 
completed 24 weeks of intensive post 
graduate training at the Naval School 
ol Aviation Medicine in Pensacola, 
Florida. Before receiving his Flight 
Surgeon Wings. Dr. Palumbo took 
familiarization flight training in single 
and multi-engine aircraft and helicop- 
ters. He has received orders to Carrier 
Air Group Seven at the Oceana Naval 
Air Station. Virginia Beach. Virginia. 



Al'I'olN I Ml NTS IN THU SCHOOL 

of Medicine 

Recently, the Board of Regents an- 
nounced the appointment of Dr. Walter 
R. Hepner oi the University of Mis- 
souri, who will serve as Professor of 
Pediatrics, and Dr. Lorin J. Mullins o\ 
Purdue University as Visiting Professor 
of Biophysics in Pediatric Research. 



Faculty Members Promoted 

Dr. Vernon M. Smith was promoted to 
Professor of Clinical Medicine: Dr. 
James R. Karns was named Associate 
Professor of Medicine, and Dr. Edmund 
S. Rowe was promoted to Research 
Associate Professor of Medical Psychol- 
ogy. 



Grants Boost Research at the 
School of Medicine 

I he Department ol Pediatrics has re- 
ceived two U. S. Public Health Service 
grants tor research in hereditary dis- 
eases. 

Drs. Samuel P. Bessman and Thorn is 
A. Oood. with the aid oi an SIS. 170 
grant, will conduct a stud} o\ mucous 
substances that contribute to the viscos- 
it\ ol saliva in hereditary fibrocystic 
diseases. It is theorized that these sub- 




Signers 

= — -~m*m 0ADne - 



PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



FRANKLIN UNIFORM CO. 

Uniform Satisfaction 

PHYSICIANS DENTISTS NURSES 

MAIDS WAITRESSES BEAUTICIANS 

— Stores Located — 



235 PARK AVENUE 

BALTO. 1, MD. 

MU 5 7222 

712 E. GRACE ST. 

RICHMOND 19, VA 

Ml 4 2685 



900 11th ST N.W. 

WASH. 1, D.C. 

EX 3 8200 

515 BOUSH ST. 

NORFOLK 10, VA. 

MA 7 3639 



If you cannot sell fluid milk, sepa- 
rate it and sell your cream to us. 
We will buy it year round. Write 
for particulars. 

Chesapeake Creameries 

INCORPORATED 
Baltimore 23, Md. 

OR CALL EDmondson 6-5300 



(AJarct-Srvon School 
Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 
805 N. Charles St. YE. 7-1165 

Baltimore, Md. 



42 



the Maryland Magazine 



stances, which are probablj insoluble 
mucoproteins, maj acl to plug the 
respirator] tree, salivary glands, and 

pancreas and so damage them that they 
become susceptible to recurrent infec- 
tion. 

Dr. Bessman will work with Dr. 
Raymond 1 . Qemmens, on a grant of 

$9,258 which will provide for measure- 
ment of various amino acids in the 
urine and plasma of children suffering 
from congenital mental retardation and 
other neurological detects of unknown 
origin. 

A third grant of the USPHS has been 
awarded to the University Hospital for 
preliminary studies in the held of hos- 
pital automation. Edward H. Noroian. 
Director of the Hospital's Department 
of Administrative Research and Devel- 
opment, will be principal investigator 
of the project. He stated its objective 
as an attempt to establish 1 ) existing 
automation techniques that could be ap- 
plied to hospitals; 2) other hospital 
procedures to which automation could 
be applied; 3) means of enlisting sup- 
port of industry and science for devel- 
opment of automated clinics in hospi- 
tals; and 4) cost estimates for the pro- 
posed automation. The grant is in the 
amount of $1,984. 

A grant of $14,861 from the U. S. 
Office of Vocational Rehabilitation will 
enable Dr. Paul F. Richardson to employ 
a physiatrist and other staff members 
to aid in the teaching of physical medi- 
cine and rehabilitation to medical stu- 
dents, physical therapy students, and 
house officers. Dr. Richardson is Head 
of the Division of Physical Medicine 
at the School of Medicine. 



X-Ray Graduates Honored 

Nine graduates of the School of X-Ray 
Technology of the School of Medicine 
were honored at a dinner in the special 
dining room of University Hospital 
December 1 7. They were awarded di- 
plomas and pins by Dr. John M. Dennis, 
Professor of Radiology and Head of 
the Department. 

Lad F. Grapski, Director of Univer- 
sity Hospital, spoke on "The Growth 
and Development of the Baltimore 
Campus with Special Emphasis on the 
Medical School-Hospital Complex." 

Those successfully completing the 18- 
month course were: Carolee Carey, 
Towson; Patricia Hartman, Towson; 

(Continued on next page) 




MASSEY- FERGUSON, INC. 

BALTIMORE BRANCH 

YORK & TIMONIUM ROADS 
TIMONIUM, MARYLAND 

Look For our Local Deafer in Your Community 




TTi-]jnjlLL!3 



OLES 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 

Jjaltimore i Jrioneer (envelope JManufaclurer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. ADams 4-3979 



CALL US 3-4600 

When Planning Your Next 

AIR CONDITIONING, LOW TEMPERATURE 

or REFRIGERATION JOB . . . 

Specialists In Complete Installations 

and Service by our Own Experienced personnel 

PIONEER REFRIGERATION COMPANY, INC. 

LEASING OF COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS AVAILABLE 



2867 W. Franklin St. 

Exclusive ^ 



Cttrrti/k. 



Baltimore 23, Md. 

" Distributor 



I HE Travel Everywhere — 

METROPOLITAN Independent and Conducted Tours 

TOURIST COMPANY Personalized Travel Service Since 1923 

1115 N. Charles Street — Baltimore 1, Maryland * LExington 9-7300 



March-April, 1960 



43 



CARLEA 

BRAND N ami 



Sanitation Chemicals 

AND 

Janitor Supplies 

SIMONIZ 

— Cleaners and Waxes 

BRILLO 

— Steel Wool Floor ond 
Hond Podi 

BLACK & DECKER 

— Commercial 

Vacuum) 

GEN1 HAL 

— Electric — Floor 

Scrubbing & Polishing Machines 

CARLEA JANITOR SUPPLY CO. 

516 W. Franklin St. 
MU 5-5608 Baltimore I, Md. MU 5-5269 



Hendlers 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



Career in Business 

Day <S Evening Classes 
Complete Courses 

Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

Stenographic, Junior Accounting. 

Wrife or Phone for Catalogue 

STRAYER COLLEGE 
18 N. Charles St. LE 9-5626 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

land Planning and Subdivision 

6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PA«K MD 
T.Uphon, JUnip.r 9-7501 



Sail} Ludwig, Dundalk; Kathleen Mar- 
shall. Dundalk; David Murray, Seaford, 
Delaware; Glenda Parks. Rockdale, 
Maryland; Dorothj Snyder, Hagen- 
town; Susan Smith, Catonsville; Caro- 
line strong. Baltimore. 

Most ol the graduates have alread'. 
accepted positions in the Baltimore area. 



School of 

NURSING 



Lillie M. Largey 



NAPNES 

Miss Lee franklin. '54. attended and 
participated in a Regional Workshop 
sponsored by the National Association 
for Practical Nurse Education and Ser- 
vice (NAPNES) in Wilmington. Dela- 
ware, recently. 

The workshop placed emphasis on 
the new role of the practical nurse 
today — recruitment, job satisfaction, 
membership in organizations and edu- 
cation. 

Miss Franklin's speech was titled 
"The Clinical Period" and was con- 
cerned with the period of time student 
practical nurses spend in the actual hos- 
pital area and how head nurses and 
other nursing service personnel help 
make this a valuable learning experi- 
ence. 



Seventieth Anniversary 
Celebration 

The Seventieth Anniversary of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Nursing 
was honored with a program sponsored 
by the faculty of the School and by the 
Nurses' Alumnae Association. It was 
held in Whitehurst Hall on December 
9, 10. II. 1959. 

Mrs. Norma long. President of the 
Alumnae Association, gave the intro- 
ductory speech and some very stimu- 
lating topics were discussed. They were 
as follows: 1 ) Newer Trends oi Nursing 
Education — Dean Florence M. Gipe 
and panel: 2 I Cardiac Nursing — Patri- 
cia Kenealj and panel. Supervisor <•!' the 
Cardiac Team at University Hospital: 
3) Recover) Room Nursing — Alice 
Annuity. Supervisor of Recovery Room 
at Universit) Hospital: 4i Psychiatric 
Nursmg Nancj Anderson: 5) Neuro- 
surgical Nursing — Rita Malek and 



EST 



IKES* 



900 



Quality 
fruits 
Produce 
and 
frozen 
foods 

HERRn-KIRKUJOOD 

MUlberry 5-5111 

28-34 S. FRONT STREET 

BALTIMORE 2, MARYLAND 



Thomas & Thompson Co. 

Established I - 

The Downtown 
Prescription Drug Store 

Have Your Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded by 

PERSCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

at Baltimore and Light Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

— Delivery Service — 

TELEPHONE 

SAratoga 7-2960 



THE 
TOWN 
HOUSE 

"Famous for Food In 
the Maryland Tradition" 

Open Daily 

LUNCHEON, COCKTAILS, 
DINNER 

Howard at 27th HO 7-5191 
Baltimore. Md. 



KIDLUEIL & KIOWEll, Inc. 

Plastering • Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 

WEbster 5-4500 MD. 



44 



i h e Maryland Magazine 



panel, Supervisor of Neuro-Surgic.il 
Nursing at University Hospital; Reha- 
bilitative Nursing — Cecelia /itkus 

The Pi Chapter of Sigma Theta 1 au, 
the National Nursing Honoran Society 
that was installed at the University oJ 
Maryland last June, participated in the 
celebration of the 70th Anniversary of 
the School of Nursing by sponsoring a 
tea tor the freshman nursing students 
at College Park. The tea was held on 
Saturday, December 11. 1959, in the 
recreation room of Whitehurst Hall. 
The students chatted with the members 
of Sigma Theta Tau while enjoying the 
plentiful refreshments, which were com- 
plete with a cake decorated in purple 
and fuschia. the colors of the organiza- 
tion. 

The Society also constructed an ex- 
hibit that was displayed the entire week. 
This was designed to emphasize the 
motto of Sigma Theta Tau — Love, 
Honor, and Courage. Included in the 
exhibit were the key and the newly 
framed charter. The table was also 
adorned with the beautiful flower of the 
organization, the orchid. It is hoped 
that some students might have been 
inspired by these activities and might 
become future candidates for member- 
ship in Sigma Theta Tau. 



Institute on Problems 
on Tuberculosis 

Miss Shirley Harp, graduate student in 
Medical-Surgical Nursing from Univer- 
sity of Maryland, and Miss Virginia C. 
Conley, Assistant Professor at the 
School of Nursing, attended an Institute 
on Problems on Tuberculosis Control 
held at Lake Junaluska, North Carolina. 
The institute was set up to teach the 
latest trends in tuberculosis control and 
ways of working together for the benefit 
of the patient. 



Medico 

It is of interest to the members of the 
alumnae to know that two of our mem- 
bers have shown a very worthwhile 
interest in MEDICO. 

Shirley Wolfe, '56, spent a four- 
month tour of duty in Saigon last year 
assisting other members of MEDICO in 
setting up a chest surgery unit there. 

Shirley Ward, '55, plans to leave in 
the spring for Haiti where she will be 
assisting in setting up a general surgery 
unit. 

(Continued on next page) 



Moving with Care, Everywhere 



by Land 



iod— 'V 



by Sea 



by Air 



DQVIDSOft 

TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. 



• Pre-Planned Moving to take many details off your hands 

• Nation-Wide and World-Wide Service thru United Van Lines 

• Sanitized Vans, protected against germs, insects, odors 

• Saf-T-Pak, cleanest, safest method for fragile goods 

• Palletized Storage, each lot in clean, mobile containers 
BALTIMORE • BRoadway 6-7900 WASHINGTON • LAwrence 9-2700 



WILLIAMS 




CONSTRUCTION 




COMPANY 




INC. 




General Contractors 




Highways — Airports 




Phone MUrdock 


BALTIMORE, 


6-1000 


MD. 



DIRECT FACTORY 
AGENTS FOR 

M. G. 

AUSTIN 

HEALEY 

MAGNETTE 

MORRIS 

HILLMAN 

SUNBEAM 

RAPIER 

ROLLS ROYCE 

TRIUMPH 

SPRITE 

JAGUAR 

ALFA-ROMEO 

PORSCHE 



SALES AND-SERVICE 




1001 CATHEDRAL~TT. BALTIMORE, MD. 

LExington 9-1559 



THE SOUTHERN PLATE GLASS (0. 



gi 



2519 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE 
BALTIMORE 17, MARYLAND 



i and <d\l\z.taL C-onlxacioii. 

LAFAYETTE 3-7200 



March- April, 1960 



45 



m 



WASHINGTON 
WOODWORKING 
CO., INC. 



MANUFACTURERS 

OF 

SPECIAL MILLWORK 



COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS 

912 - 4th STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Phone: NAtional 8-5624 



CRUSTY 
PIE CO. 



Bakers of 




Finest Quality 

PIES — PASTRIES — DONUTS 
CAKES, DECORATED CAKES 

30 - O St., N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

ADams 2-7111 



Murray Hardware Co. 

Your Hardware Department 
Store 

Open Daily 9 to 9 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

UNIVERSITY BLVD. and 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 

LANGLEY PARK, MD. 
HEmlock 4-3000 



WArfield 7-8538 
HEATING 
PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
JOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF, Inc. 

6313 ■ 46th Ave Riverdol*. Md 



CUSTOM MADE 




Bookcases ■ Paneling 




Wordrobes • Partitions 




Store Fixtures • Display Cases 




Built In • Ready Made 




Cabinets Toble Legs 




PARTITIONS 




CABINETS FOR 




HOME OFFICE— INSTITUTIONS 





I wo Workshops Benefii 
State's Ni rsi s 

Maryland nurses recently had an oppor- 
tunity to work with nationally recog- 
nized specialists in nursing administra- 
tion and teaching at two workshops held 
at the School ot Nursing January 25-29 
and February 1-5. 

Head nurses, supervisors, and direc- 
tors ot nursing service were particularly 
interested in the first workshop, on 
"Nursing Service Administration.'' It 
was directed bj Helen G. Graves, k V 
M.S.. Director ot Nursing Service at 
Emory University Hospital. Atlanta. 
Miss Graves was assisted by Miss 
Amelia Willers, Director of Nursing 
Service at University Hospital. Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

The second workshop, on "Clinical 
leaching." was planned to meet the 
needs of those who serve in a dual 
capacity as head nurse and clinical 
instructor. It was directed hy Florence 
M. Cnpe. k.N.. Ed.D.. Dean and Pro- 
lessor of Nursing at the University of 
Maryland School of Nursing. 

The workshops were arranged at 
the request of hospital administrators 
throughout the state who wish to im- 
prove their hospitals' nursing service 
standards and hedside teaching meth- 
odology. 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 



Dr. Whai ey Technical Director 

Dr. Wilson M. Whaley has joined Ar- 
thur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge. Massa- 
chusetts, industrial research consultants, 
as assistant technical director of their 
Midwest Division-Miner Laboratories. 
Formerly he was a section head at the 
kescarch Laboratories of General 
Foods Corporation and prior to that 
was assistant director of research at the 
Pabst Laboratories. Milwaukee. 



1 \( ULTY No i I s 

Dr. Francis M. Miller. Associate Pro- 
fessor oi Chemistry, has returned to 
the School of Pharmacj alter having 
spent one year in German) on sabbatical 
leave from the University. 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

ITS THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 
3°o Interest on Savings 

• 

A d in in uttra t io n Bu ild ing 

6495 New Hampshire Ave., 
Hyattsville, Md. 

HYATTSVILLE — SILVER SPRING 

JUniper 8-5000 Member F.D.I.C 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

15710 Colesville Road 

SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



Thompson Furniture 


Co. 


Furniture of Quality 


• 


at Reasonable Prices 




MODERN & PERIOD 




SIMMONS, KROEHIER, THOMASVILLE, 


BASSETT, GEM CRIB & CRADLE, 


LANE 


1810 Rhode Island Ave.. 


WE. 


Washington. D.C. LA 6-1622 



American 


Disinfectant Co. 


Pes 


t c 


ontrol Service 


928 


EYE 


STREET, N.W. 


Washington 


1, D 


C. NAtional 8-6478 



46 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, Associate 
{Professor of Chemistry, along with Iun 
wife and five children, visited the par- 
ents of Mrs. Doorenbos in Hawaii foi 

SIX weeks during the summer. 

Dr. W. Arthur Purdum. Professor of 
Hospital Pharmaey since 1947, has 
been named Vice President in charge 
of Production and Development of Bur- 
roughs Brothers Manufacturing Com- 
pany. He takes up his new duties imme- 
diately. Dr. Purdum is a graduate of 
the School of Pharmacy, receiving his 
Ph.D. in 1941. He has been Chief 
Pharmacist at The Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital for fourteen \ears and has numer- 
ous publications. 

Joseph Cohen, Ph.G. 1929, Executive 
Secretary of the Maryland Pharmaceu- 
tical Association and Baltimore Metro- 
politan Pharmaceutical Association, was 
re-elected to the Executive Committee 
of the National Conference of State 
Association Secretaries at a meeting in 
Cincinnati in August. He was also 
elected Vice President of the Metropol- 
itan Drug Association Secretaries at a 
meeting in St. Louis in September. More 
recently, he was elected Chairman of 
the Drug Manufacturers Relations Com- 
mittee at St. Louis, representing both 
State and Metropolitan Drug Associa- 
tion Secretaries. 

Henry Seidman, Ph.G. 1929, received 
the Meritorious Award for 1959 of the 
Alpha Zeta Omega Pharmaceutical Fra- 
ternity at their national convention in 
Miami, Florida, this past summer. 



University of Maryland, School of 

Pharmacy Scholarships Awarded 

First Semester 1959-60 

Freshmen: Alan J. Aronson, Sanford 
E. Bias, Yale H. Caplan, Thomas H. 
Keller, Jr., John E. Myers, Gerald M. 
Rachanow, Leon D. Shargel. 

Sophomores and donors: Louis Gu- 
binsky, Carroll Chemical Company; 
Walter P. Mackay, A. M. Lichtenstein 
Fund; Sydney Hamet, Prince Georges- 
Montgomery County Pharmaceutical 
Association; Robert Kantorski, Alumni 
Association, School of Pharmacy; Allan 
S. Pristoop, Alumni Association, School 
of Pharmacy; Sol Rosenstein, Read's 
Drug Stores' Foundation. 

Juniors and donors: June Eng, Nox- 
zema Foundation; William J. Heinrich, 
Read's Drug Stores' Foundation; Harvey 
D. Reisenweber, Alumni Association, 
College Park. 

(Continued on next page) 



POOR, BOWEN, 

BARTLETT & KGNNEI INC 



Insurance & Bonding of every 
description for more than 
half a century 



Policy analysis 
Engineering surveys 
Appraisals 



Phone: LExington 9-6004 

BALTIMORE 3, MD. 

26 S. CALVERT STREET 



PRINTING 




LITHOGRAPHING 



PESTS: 



"Gall 7ke 



TERMITES? 



&<%U Ma* 




PEST Control since 18b 



C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 
SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST.. N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



ESTABLISHED 1871 

For fine picture framing 
REMEMBER... 

VEERHOFF 

• Paintings 

• Reproductions 
• Old Prints 

1512 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 
DUpont 7-2322 



March-April, 1960 



47 




YOU CAN 
DEPEND ON 



MILLER 




HOME GARDEN 

CHEMICALS . . . 

At Leading Garden Supply, Hardware 
and Department Stores 

BULK CHEMICALS . . . 

For Form Use. See Your Miller Dealer. 

MILLER CHEMICAL AND 
FERTILIZER CORP. 

Baltimore 18, Maryland 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 

and ACCESSORIES 

L«t our well-trained staff assist you 

in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 S CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area since 1919 



ACME 
TILE COMPANY 


Terrazzo 
Tile — Marble — Slate 


A. F. Pizza 

PL 2-3554 908 Trinity St. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



MUlberry 5 2823 



Established 1876 



MEMBER ABAA 

OLD, RARE AND OUT OF-PRINT BOOKS 

MARYLAND BOOKS SCHOLARLY BOOKS 

805 N. HOWARD ST. 

Baltimore 1 , Md. 

ALLEN W. SCHULTZ 



Seniors and donors Ronald Goldner, 
Read's Drug Stores' Foundation; M. 

David Kichman. American Foundation 
1 1 >r Pharmaceutical I ducation; Martin 
Sh.ugel. American Inundation lor Phar- 
maceutical I ducation; Albert H. War- 
field, Read's Drug Stores' Foundation. 
I he following Students are recipients 
Ol legislative scholarships: William 
Michael Kennes. Ronald Maggitti. Dan- 
iel Shaner. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College of Special and 
Continuation Studies) 

G. Allen Sager 



Mr. Stotti kr Heads Regional Group 

Mr. Richard H. Stottler. Assistant Dean 
and Director of Institutes, University 
College, has been elected Chairman of 
the Middle Atlantic Region of the As- 
sociation of University Evening Col- 
leges. The appointment was made at the 
fall meeting of the group, held at the 
University of Delaware. 

Mr. Valois Takes New Post 
at Michigan 

Mr. John Valois, for two and one-half 
years assistant to Richard H. Stottler, 
Director of Institutes, resigned recently 
to join the staff of the University of 
Michigan. Mr. Valois will be supervisor 
of the correspondence study department 
of the Extension Service, under Dr. 
Everrctt Soop. Director of Extension. 

Mr. Valois came to the University of 
Maryland in 1957 from the National 
Council of Catholic Men where he had 
served as business manager and man- 
ager of the film department for two 
\ears. 

Holding a master of arts degree in 
educational psychology from Catholic 
University. Mr. Valois expects to com- 
plete the doctorate in the same field 
next June. 

v\ here They Are Now 

Dr. and Mrs. Judson Pearson are 
hack at the University of Colorado 
where he is a Professor in the Depart- 
ment of Sociology Dr. Pearson taught 
last year in the European Division on a 
leave oi absence from Colorado. 



Why $jgl@?$? is 

mnRvipno s FinesT toRn 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is< 
pulled from the 
stalk. 




■ 
' WHITE SWEET CORN I 



GOLDEN 



SWEET 



— Packed by — 

F. 0. miTCHELl & BRO., Inc. 

PERRYMAN, MO. - KENNED Y VI LLE . MD. 
Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen, 621 -J 



• 


Buy Defense Bonds 


Every Payday 


J. H. F. 


• 



furniture 
Interior Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

Homes and Institutions for 

over 64 years 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU 5-4510 Baltimore, Md. 



"A 



SEALTEST FOODS 

Division of 
National Dairy Products Corp. 

For the "Best" in Dairy Products 

Buy Seoltest 

ADams 2-101 1 



48 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Larry Lawson, formerly a lec- 
turer in both the Atlantic and European 
Divisions, is now Head of the Depart- 
ment ol Sociology at Mt. Union College, 
Alliance, Ohio. 

Mr. C. Richard Orr, who is a five- 
year veteran of the European Division, 
is currently teaching speech in the At- 
lantic Division at Pepperrell Air Force 
Base, Newfoundland. 



Conference: Ciiu in 

Members of the University College ad- 
ministrative staff attended annual meet- 
ings of several professional associations 
this fall. 

Attending the National Convention 
of the Land Grant College Association, 
held in St. Louis, Missouri, were the 
following: Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, Uni- 
versity of Maryland President, Univer- 
sity College Dean Ray Ehrensberger, 
and Associate Dean Stanley J. Drazek. 

The national meeting of the Associa- 
tion of University Evening Colleges was 
held this year in Pittsburgh. Represent- 
ing University College were: Dr. Ralph 
J. Klein, Assistant Dean for General 
Studies; Mr. Edward F. Cooper, Direc- 
tor of the Baltimore Division; Mr. John 
Valois, Assistant Director of Institutes; 
and Mr. James Quimper, Coordinator 
of the Campus Evening Division. 

Mr. Donald Deppe, Assistant to the 
Director of Institutes, and Mr. Richard 
H. Stottler attended the annual meeting 
of the Adult Education Association in 
Buffalo. 



Dr. Dickson Visits Campus 

Dr. Paul Dickson, starting his third year 
as a University of Maryland official, re- 
cently visited the campus for the first 
time. Dr. Dickson is Resident Dean of 
the Munich branch of Maryland's Over- 
seas Program, located in Munich, Ger- 
many. 

Since this was Dr. Dickson's first 
opportunity to visit the College Park 
campus he spent much of his time be- 
coming personally acquainted with aca- 
demic deans and department heads in 
the disciplines taught at the Munich 
branch. He also conferred with Uni- 
versity College authorities and with 
Colonel Robert Glafka, newly appointed 
Assistant to the Dean for Administra- 
tion at the Munich branch. 

The Munich branch is a day time 
school offering two years of college to 

(Continued on next page) 



LUM B E R 
• MILL, WORK 

• BUILDER'S II A ROW A R 
• PITTSBURGH PAINTS 

"Silver Spring's First Lumber Yard" 




SILVER ^f.SPRING 
BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 



8226 GEORGIA AVENUE AT RIPLEY ST. 
JUniper 9-2300 SILVER SPRING, MD. 



JUniper 9-4580 



JUniper 9-3340 



A. MYRON COWELL, Inc. 

MASONRY- CONTRACTORS 

8416 Ramsey Ave. Silver Spring, Md 



TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

8135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md. 



WINDOW - ON • THE - KITCHEN 

Kitcltetefua 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food ... All our desserts are 
home-made popular prices 

no tipping . . . air conditioned 



BREAKFAST • LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee 5c 



cup 



Open Daily and Sunday 

11th Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 

11th & E Sts., N.W. Washington, D.C. 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. • 

WHOLESALE ONLY 
1612 FOURTEENTH ST.. N.W. 

Complete 

AIR CONDITIONING. REFRIGERATION. 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 
MARYLAND. VIRGINIA AND 
WEST VIRGINIA 

Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

• WASHINGTON 9. D. C. • 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

2 Miles North — University of Maryland 

AAA — Duncan Hines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phones WE 5-6291 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

ROOM 1100 
501 St. Paul St. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExington 9-0020 



March-April, 1960 



49 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 




. \l ii mil i 

Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



C/ojj 1928 
insurance of all Kinds 

UNion 4-1 100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



ZSSKAV 

Wquality*# 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
18 cart-fully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
gure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
Win. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDLE CO. 

THE ^========= 

LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

(Jour ^jrrienc/lij ^hroili 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
mar the University of Maryland. 
>'>u'll find complete comfort and 

rnrr ■ 

Phoac AP 7-4493 
For Bmi tBtiom 

• ■ Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 
7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



dependents oi IS military and ci- 
vilian governmental personnel in Eu- 
rope. I his tall 370 students are en- 
rolled in the school which has facilities 
at McOraw kaserne. a L S. Army in- 
stallation in Munich. 

Mrs. Dickson accompanied her hus- 
band to College Park, and visited 
friends and family in New York and 
Arkansas before their return to Munich. 



I WO Hi CBIV1 Am v\( ED Degrees 

Joseph N. Pamplin, '59, received the 
Master oi Arts degree and Lt Col. 
Julian R. Abernathy. Jr., "57, the Mas- 
ter of Business Administration degree at 
the fall convocation of the George 
Washington University. 



Cooke to Bai ustics 

Captain Gerald E. Cooke, '59, of the 
U. S. Air Force, has been assigned to 
the Air Force Ballistic Missile Division 
as Executive Officer. 



Colonel Glafka Appointed 

Colonel Alvin R. Glafka. U. S. Army 
(ret.), has been named Assistant to the 
Dean of Administration in the Munich 
branch of the European Division of the 
Overseas Program. He will serve under 
Dr. Paul Dickson. Resident Dean of the 
Munich branch. 

A former public school educator, Col. 
Glafka was a high school coach and sci- 
ence teacher in the State of Pennsyl- 
vania for 10 years before entering the 
military service. He holds a Bachelor 
of Science degree from Eureka College 
and Master of Education degree from 
the University of Pittsburgh. 



Fish Appointment 

I be first full-time University College 
stateside off-campus lecturer in educa- 
tion travels more than 275 miles each 
week to meet her classes. Yes. she's a 
lady, too! 

Mrs. Alphorctta S. Fish travels on 
Monday nights to Accokeek, where she 
leaches Education 153. The Feaching 
ol Reading. It is a 72-mile round trip 
from her home in College Park to Ac- 
cokeek. 

On Wednesdays, Mrs. Fish teaches 
Science Education 105, Workshop in 



Garden, Farm and Flower Seeds 
Fertilizer and Garden Supplies 

Power and Hand Mowers 
Plants and Bulbs — Insecticides 



F. W. Bolgiano & Company 



1220 H Street, N.W. 
NAtional 8-0091 

411 New York Ave., N.E. 
Lincoln 7-4800 























md'JlMMfg 


RETAIL & WHOLESALE 

1400 PRINCE ST. 

ALEXANDRIA, 
VA. 

TE 6-3260 




CHINESE-AMERICAN RESTURANT 

Chinese Food at Its Beet 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Excellent Carry-out Service 

320 PARK AVE. MU 5-6790 

Baltimore, Md. 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



50 



the Maryland Magazine 



Science Education for the Blementar) 
School, in Cambridge in the late after- 
noon. Then, she rushes, literally with- 
out time for dinner, to Centreville to 

teach a class m Education l- ; . I he 
Child and the Curriculum. The round 

trip from her home to the two 1 astern 
Shore communities totals about 200 
miles. 

On fhursdays Mrs. Fish meets an- 
other section of Science Education 105 
at the Highland View Elementary 
School, only six miles from the campus, 
and her week of educational "circuit- 
riding" draws to a close. 

Holding the Bachelor of Science in 
Education at Edinboro State Teachers, 
Pennsylvania, and a master's degree in 
elementary education from Western 
Michigan University, at Kalamazoo, 
Mrs. Fish came to the University of 
Maryland in the fall of 1958 as a grad- 
uate assistant to Dr. Glen Blough with 
whom she is working toward her educa- 
tion doctorate. 

Mrs. Fish taught elementary school 
in Pennsylvania for two years. She 
taught a year at Bowling Green State 
University and a year at Western Michi- 
gan University before coming to Mary- 
land. 

This year, Mrs. Fish was one of a 
highly selected group which spent the 
summer at San Jose State College on a 
National Science Foundation Workshop 
for Elementary School Teachers. 

Mrs. Fish is a frequent contributor to 
science education periodicals. Her latest 
article, in the February 1959 issue of 
The Science Teacher, is "Viewpoint on 
a Basic Problem in Elementary School 
Science." 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Births 

Dr. Ralph Shangraw, of the School of 
Pharmacy, became the father of a baby- 
son, Ralph Frederick, Jr., on August 
17, 1959. 

"Have given the world another fresh- 
man." writes Mrs. Pat Connors, former 
secretary in the Office of Alumni Rela- 
tions and wife of an engineering alum- 
nus. Michael Paul was born December 
8, 1959, and is the second son to be 
born to the Connors family. They now 
make their home in Greenbelt, Mary- 
land. 



, 



March- April, 1960 



J. 


H 


. De VEAU & SON, 

General Contractors 

ROADS EXCAVATION 
DRIVEWAYS BUILDINGS 
PIPE CONCRETE 
CONCRETE SAWS 


Inc. 


4100 J 


ones Bridge Road 








North Chevy Chase, Md. 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SUGRUE — PRES. 



NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY. Inc. 



SALES 



<J<ml 



8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. 



SERVICE 



COLLEGE PARK. MD. 




MAM ACRES 
NURSERIES 



COMPLETE LINE OF 

NURSERY STOCK IN WIDE VARIETY 

LANDSCAPE SERVICE 

DORMANT SPRAYING 

TRANSPLANTING 

TREE MOVING 

PRUNING 



H. W. "Phoebe' 
Quaintance 
Class of '27 



COLESVILLE PIKE 

(U. S. 29) 

5 MILES FROM 

GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING, 

MARYLAND 

MA 2-1234 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St., S.E. 

Lincoln 3-8151 

Virg : nia residents . JEfferson 4-1110 

Northwest and suburban LOckwood 5-3556 

Baltimore MEdford 3-6590 

Towson VAIley 5-7133 

Glen Burnie SOuthfield 1-0550 

Annapolis COIonial 8-3451 

OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 

MARYLAND 



SmiTH UJELDII1C 

COMPANY 



PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

Phone UNion 4-1611 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 

Hyattsville. Md. 



57 



Directory of Advertisers 



A H fcll ' XL — I , 

•Auuc 





A l l", II f Mnn/ p )v l inn til n, . 



AmmiiijiTI Ui>iniri'laiit I irlll|unw _ 

•Atrrtmr 1'uil Products (AinNUr Pri- 

V\\ VnEBF-^mp-, 3 4 , T|l[ II , ,,, , , ! | ,| u ^ 

31 

- 




~ l f r — m I , i m i ' I i I |h |i > 




sup] 
1 — CI — r- n -»<iirr 

♦— . — < .t.. .. . 




-i in. in..- r. i n 

-* '" '.■ ' 'i * — 1 1 . ii i \ 

'**"'"• I ■ ■ " I T". ' ' I \ i ., Tl~»— 




^-ii — Ir 



^4wi i nn. I n i n ~t— it. 
,- IsYhr E. A I. 

"hiiln n" ' ' ' " ' 
I i n , 4. 



i^ls rispj K i ■ 



II Hi ' mi 



. i n ii li l n « 



\Sk Little Bit ol Norwaj 

i d M issiles .\ Space Dn isi n 




^-^Ut 



j/^1 lit- Martin Companj 

< j i i 1 1 in ■' i 'i 1 1 in 



" ' lllllllllll I III I I ^MHII|| III 

_ L-' Milln Chemical A Fertilizer Company 




33 b'Qtuinl Aim- Nursery 

31 

i . ti ni i "i i| i| i|i I .. 

II ,i 1 T I II in 

30 




Safewaj 'I railwaj - 

4'/ mM.tin ii i 




•!<. ^/^ I Ii rural 

II I II 






30 lllll ill ll I H I 

44 * - 

. ii mi I ha. — . 



-^t— -ft'll , i. Hi 
|f/Sufford Hotel 

' ^,/rViii. P. Stein, Inc 

47 




_ij I 1 urn . 

i i II. il l Tuu. i i 

4.; 

* 8 l/fh, I i. it.'! Claj 
18 

4j< **veerhofl Galleries 

4, ""tv ir •'' '■'■■'' ' ^ '■ ' ' ' * 



j I W wi l i , ' ( I . Ill ■ 

., ; yp- ' • •- • ' " '■' '" ■ 




" 'I ''' | ■ '" 
I "•■■ 



^t^n^H""*^ 



- i n _ — g=^s agw 




. msq- . I 1 .. i .i' r . i .i i ; > ' — 



^Tht n i£ 



49 
41 
39 

41 
47 

24 
28 
31 
36 
50 
38 
36 
35 
41 
49 
49 
4fl 
51 
37 
45 
27 
42 
35 

44 

34 



44 
29 

44 

37 



2) 
41 



27 






the Maryland Magazine 




A 



Spring Reunions 

Alumni-Varsity Football 

MAY 7, 1960 
College Park Campus 



LUMNI FROM ALL SECTIONS OF THE COUNTRY WILL BE RETURNING TO THE 

College Park campus on Saturday, May 7 for Class Reunions, business meetings, 
a barbecue luncheon, track and football. 

All alumni, their families and friends are both invited and encouraged to attend. 
Special emphasis is being placed on the classes which fall in the five year category. The 
spotlight is focused on the classes of 1910, and 1935. These will be the Golden and 
Silver reunions. Also receiving attention will be the classes of 1915, 1920, 1925, 1930, 
1940, 1945. 1950 and 1955. 

The football game will present a preview of our 1960 team and will recall to 
the campus many of the greats of years gone by. The game will start at 2:30 P.M. 

A triangular track-meet will bring together Georgetown, the Naval Academy 
and Maryland. The first event is slated for 12:30 P.M. 

Tickets for the Athletic Events are $1 .50 for reserved seats and $1 .25 for general 
admission. Additional information is available through the Alumni Office at College 
Park. Plan now to be present for 

SPRING REUNIONS 





EXPANDING THE FRONTIERS 
OF SPACE TECHNOLOGY 



1 ockheed Missiles and Space Division is prime contractor 
for the Vi\\ poi akis Fleet Ballistic Missile; the Air Force 
AG] v\ Satellite in the DISCOVERER program; MIDAS 
infrared detection satellite system; samos satellite pro- 
gram; An Force X-7; and Army kingi isher. 

I hese programs include: celestial mechanics; com- 
puter research and development; electromagnetic wave 
propagation and radiation; electronics; the flight sciences; 
human engineering; magnetohydrodynamics; man in 
space, materials and processes; applied mathematics; 
operations research and analysis; ionic, nuclear and 
plasma propulsion and exotic fuels; sonics; space com- 
munications; space medicine; space navigation; and space 
physics. 

Headquarters for the Division are at Sunnyvale, Cali- 
fornia, on the San Francisco Peninsula, and research and 
development facilities are in the Stanford Industrial Park 
in Palo Alto and at Van Nuys in the San Fernando Valley. 



Facilities are new and modern and include the latest in 
technical equipment. A 4,000 acre Division-owned static 
test base in the Ben Lomond mountains near Santa Cruz 
provides for all phases of static field test. In addition, 
Might test facilities are provided at Cape Canaveral, 
Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, Santa Maria, California. 

ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS 

Such programs reach into the future and deal with 
unknown and stimulating environments. It is a rewarding 
future with a company that has an outstanding record 
of progress and achievement. If you are experienced in 
any of the above areas, or in related work, we invite your 
inquiry. Please write: Research and Development Staff. 
Dept. C-52WW, 962 W. El Camino Real. Sunnyvale, 
California. U.S. citizenship or existing Department of 
Defense clearance required. 



Lockheed 



MISSILES AND SPACE DIVISION 



SUNNYVALE. PALO ALTO. VAN NUYS. SANTA CRUZ. SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA • CAPE CANAVERAL. FLORIDA • ALAMOGORDO. NEW MEXICO ■ HAWAII 




\lumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 




Volume XXXI Number Four • May-June 1960 



Decisive Issues in Higher Education • Research at Maryland Aids Growth of South 




EXPANDING THE FRONTIERS 
OF SPACE TECHNOLOGY 



Lockheed Missiles and Space Division is prime contractor 
lor the Nfavj POl aris Fleet Ballistic Missile;the Air Force 
aci n.\ Satellite in the discoverer program; midas 
infrared detection satellite system; samos satellite pro- 
gram; Air Force X-7; and Army kingfisher. 

These programs include: celestial mechanics; com- 
puter research and development; electromagnetic wave 
propagation and radiation; electronics; the (light sciences; 
human engineering; magnetohydrodynamics; man in 
space: materials and processes; applied mathematics; 
operations research and analysis; ionic, nuclear and 
plasma propulsion and exotic fuels; sonics; space com- 
munications; space medicine; space navigation; and space 
physics. 

Headquarters tor the Division are at Sunnyvale, Cali- 
fornia. Oil the San Francisco Peninsula, and research and 
development facilities are in the Stanford Industrial Park 
in Palo Alto and at Van Nuvs in the San Fernando Yallev. 



Facilities are new and modern and include the latest in 
technical equipment. A 4,000 acre Division-owned static 
test base in the Ben Lomond mountains near Santa Cruz 
provides for all phases of static field test. In addition, 
llight test facilities are provided at Cape Canaveral, 
Florida, and Vandenberg AFB, Santa Maria, California. 

ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS 

Such programs reach into the future and deal with 
unknown and stimulating environments. It is a rewarding 
future with a company that has an outstanding record 
of progress and achievement. If you are experienced in 
any of the above areas, or in related work, we invite your 
inquiry. Please write: Research and Development Staff. 
Dept. E-52WW, 962 W. El Camino Real, Sunnyvale, 
California. U.S. citizenship or existing Department of 
Defense clearance required. 



Lockheed 



MISSILES AND SPACE DIVISION 



SUNNYVALE. PALO ALTO. VAN NUYS, SANTA CRUZ. SANTA MARIA. CALIFORNIA • CAPE CANAVERAL. FLORIDA • ALAMOGORDO. NEW MEXICO • HAWAII 




M. 


ll'V'li I IK J 


. ^HT*a9 


■n* 


k — ^ftMfl 





The Cover: rhe South h.i^ the ra^n materials foi pi id th< South- 

ern universities are aiding tins progress in means ol expanding bash research 
programs Important research projects carried <>ut al the University >>t M 

land and other Southern universities are described in .in article beginning 
on page 14. 



the 






] 


MAY JUNE • 1960 


Marylanc 

magazine 


1 


Volume XXXI Number 4 


Alumni Publication of 


OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 


the University of Maryland 


HARRY A. BOSWELL JR., '42 President 

MRS. ELIZABETH ROHR SINGLETON, '47, Vice-President 


BOARD OF REGENTS 


DR. WILSON H. ELKINS DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 


CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 
B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 


President of the University 


DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 


OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 


OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 


ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 


ENOS S. STOCKBRIDGE, Assistant Treasurer 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 


CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 

JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 


THOMAS B. SYMONS 
C. EWING TUTTLE 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 


AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer SALLY L. OGDEN 

i ft 1 A f iril "1 1 OPflrt lAflrr rt-n M \M 


18 W. <:btn street zyju wise. hvo., n. w. 
OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS Baltimore 18 Md. Washinaton. D. C. 


MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 


C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director (HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113. 


In This Issue — 




FEATURES 




2 


The Alumni Diary 


3 


Alumni and Campus Notes 


8 


Decisive Issues in Higher Education 


13 


Far East Division Graduates 62 


14 


Research at Maryland Aids Growth of South 


18 


Dr. Opik Awarded Medal 


19 


Maryland Books and Authors 


20 


Do You Remember? 


21 


1960 Football Outlook 


22 


Sports Summary 1959-60 


NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 




23 


Agriculture 


27 


Arts and Sciences 


32 


Business and Public Administration 


33 


Dentistry 


38 


Education 


40 


Engineering 


43 


Law 


45 


Medicine 


47 


Nursing 


51 


Pharmacy 


54 
58 


University College 




Completed Careers 


60 


Directory of Advertisers 




Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 




College Park, Md.. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 




1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member 


of American Alumni Council. 



\l t MM COl St II- 

.•Ill <■! 

. i ii n i s 

ton 

M Gulbreatfa 
Arihui H Hamilloi 
i luyton Reynold! 

\s Gilbert Dent, Ii 

( harlea I I llingei 

I). Reginald V rruitt, '14 

IDMIHIITIHTION 

Ham \ Boswell, ii '42 
Ralph w I rey, lr. a "41 

( iii-Nii i \\ I awney, "3 I 

I.I MHIIII 

Di Samuel Bryanl 

Di ii. H rj Lev in, 

Di i ugene n l yon, '38 

I ..I I l I I UN 

G Wnlson Algire. '30 
( l. ii. i Dixon, ! i 
Harrj Hasslinger, "3 I 

I N .. I V. I I HIM, 

l iniiKii I oane, 
Dudley n Hiylor, '51 
\iilini c ■ \ imReuth, '3 i 

HO Ml BCOHOMICH 

Mis Miriam Bead, '31 

Mi - I m. i R. ( hapman, ; I 

M i - Agnes \liNiin Kricker, "31 

l \ H 

Mai y Arabian, '44 
I ,i\ m. in J. Redden, '34 
(, Kenneth Reiblich, '2 l > 
mi nn ini 

Dr. I Illusion K Ail. mis, ' \ 1 

Di Daniel I. Pessagno, 70 
IV William II rriplett, 'I 1 

«. I IIMSI, 

\lis Dorolh) K Herbert, '24 

Mis Norma S I ong, '49 

Mis i liznbelli R. Singleton, '47 

1 1\ man l>.i\ idov, "20 
Samuel I Raichlen, "25 
I rank I Slama, 74 



I \ 1)1 I H III Ml Mill lis 

Di Wilson II I Ik ins 

/•/, nWi '// a) the Unlvei tity 
David I Brighum, '38 

s, i relm y I reasnn i 
\ k |oi I lolm, '57, I.v.v'/ Vei relai ) 
I i. mk Block, '24. Past President 
loseph II Dcckmun, '31, Past President 
I Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
I Homei Rcmsberg, 18, Past President 
Col < » II Saunders, '10, Past President 
Di Wherl l Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
I I Sneer, 'I '. Past Pn \ident 
i \ Koon • ' "'. Past President 
|)i \iilini I lull. '19, Past President 



hi uni < 1 1 ii in PR I si \ i mils 

Bal ore David W. Bien, '2 l > 

< .H roll < ounly — 

Di I awreiicc I I eggelt, '30 
( ceil < oiuilj I i. mi is X. ( hapman, '50 
( iiiiil'iil.uul Refortl Aldridge, 75 
I asleru slum- Otis I w illej . '2 l 
I redci it k ( ounty — 

i.HiH . I Zimmei man, '37 
M ( liih < ieorge Kneplej . '38 
Mom i ounly — 

Robert W Beall, '31 

: id Geoi ge Kei lejza 
\ orl Harold McG ly, '50 
Nui ili I aslei ii Shoi 

Robert \\ Dov nes, li . '46 

( ..I Ralph I Willi. mis "33, ii 
Pillshui :ii I )i loseph I inegold, ; i 
Pin i ounty — 

I ill hi' 

Rk hmond Paul Mullinix, 
Schenectadj Mn lanice Mackej s i 
1 1 1 rnpin lami a w Stevens, ' 19 
i s Depl ol Agriculture 

William ll l van< 
ington < ounl 

ii i Vollmer, III. '40 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



Tin si \iu RESTLESS AND UNCERTAIN DAYS. We hear the timid speak of floating 
islands upon which we rest in ease, apathy and luxury. There is talk of man 
reaching beyond those hounds and barriers which have been established for him. 
All are a part ol the ageless search for additional knowledge and truth. 

Those who are timid have forgotten the great challenge of Theodore Roosevelt 
when he said. "In the battle of life, it is not the critic who counts: not the man 
who points out how the strong man stumbled or where the doer of a deed could 
have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena. . . ." 

The Alumni Association is dedicated to the objective of continuing and improv- 
ing education. Its members recall the days when men travelled by horse and buggy, 
when the radio was unknown, television a fantastic dream, air travel in the realm 
ol ridiculous and the outer reaches of space the exclusive properly of the Creator. 
I hen as now. the educated led the way and reached toward new plateaus of 
comfort, understanding and opportunity. Each succeeding generation has been 
fortified with the knowledge that again and again human freedom has died in its 
sleep and has awakened under the heel of the oppressor. Here then is our reason 
for existence, our hope for the future. We speak of both the educated and of 
those who reach for the unknown with a confidence and the courage which will 
guarantee a better tomorrow. 

Again and again headlines tell of student unrest, demonstrations and rioting. 
I he educated mind would be dangerous were it not tempered by history and the 
conviction that an explosive crusading youth holds the key to the liberty o\ man. 
Today, both education and the student of the world are in the arena. There will 
be mistakes and scars but the parade will go on and new minds and ambitions 
will fill the ranks of the fallen. 

Change is as certain as the sunrise and surely new vistas of hope lie ahead. 
Our University may well take heart as its alumni of all ages pledge their assistance 
in the arena for in the words of Victor Risel. blinded by acid from the hands of a 
racketeer. "The hammers of history are beating out a new world close to the 
hearts of the blacksmiths." Individually and collectively we shall strike the anvil. 

America must keep pace. The University at Maryland has contributed its 
shire. You cannot speak of probes into outer space, of freedoms in our American 
civilization or of service to mankind without in the same breath recalling both the 
heritage and present effort of the University of Maryland. We who are graduates 
>mi.\ former students represent many diversified interests and desires. To us a 
formal education is a vital thing to remember, to use and to wish for others. \- 
we associate, cooperate and participate, we conclude that University research 
touches most of us only indirectly, many services are not apparent on the surface 
and the future direction of education may conceivably be altered overnight. Of 
one thing we are sure, the mind of man must continue to be nourished if man is 
to exist. 

As ever, 



u 



&**—^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



MAY 

19 

29 

JUNE 

2 



Shipley Testimonial Dinner — Pres- 
idential Ballroom. Statler Hilton 
Hotel, Washington, D. C. 
Baccalaureate Exercises, Memorial 
Chapel — College Park. 



Alumni Day — School of Medicine, 
Baltimore. 

Annual Banquet honoring gradu- 
ates and class reunions, School of 
Pharmacy — Baltimore. 



2-4 June week — Alumni Association 
of the School of Dentistry — Balti- 
more. 

3 Banquet and Dance, School of 
Nursing — Emerson Hotel, Balti- 
more. 

4 Commencement Exercises. 

20-25 College Week for Women, 34th 
annual Rural Women's Short 
Course — College Park. 

20- 

July 1 Nursing institute "Cardiovascular 
Nursing" — Baltimore. 



22-24 4th Annual Adult Education Insti- 
tute — Student Union, College Park. 

24-26 Liberal Arts Institute, Student 
Union — College Park. 

27 Registration for the Summer Ses- 
sion — College Park. 

28 Summer Session begins — College 
Park. 

29- 

July 1 Summer Theater — College Park. 

JULY 

6-8 Summer Theater — College Park. 
13-15 Summer Theater — College Park. 




marking the first time an American President has appeared at 
the University of Maryland, President Eisenhower delivered an 
address opening the White House Conference on Children and 
Youth, March 27, in the William P. Cole, Jr. Student Activities 
Building. President Eisenhower said to the 5,000 delegates: "From 
the play pen to the campus our task is not to provide the condi- 



tions of an affluent equilibrium for the young, hut rather to teach 
them that such things have real value only as they are earned. 
We must see to it that our children grow up in a climate that 
encourages response to intellectual challenge, self-reliance, initia- 
tive, and a healthy regard for hard work and the dignity of man. 
To do otherwise is to do a disservice to the young.' 



May-June, 1960 




Huh Boucher 

"iVT Club Elects Boucher 

( Robert (Bob) Boucher, class ol 
1935, has just been elected to the "M" 

( liib Board ol Governors, according to 
Hots\ Alperstein, outgoing President 
and former Maryland boxing great. 

Boh was an outstanding track man 
Starring in the hurdles, high and broad 
jumps, pole vault and javelin. He set a 
University record in the high jump in 

A real estate appraiser and councilor 
now. Boh is nevertheless very active in 
i Diversity and "M" Club work. 



I se of Closed Circuit TV 

I he Zoology Department last tall pion- 
eered with lectures delivered through 

the medium Ol Closed circuit television. 

Hundreds of students each semester 
register lor Zoology I General Zool- 
ogy ["hey were formerly divided into 

two lecture sessions which were held in 
the auditorium ol the Skinner Building 
sections which numbered over lour 
hundred each 

I he si/e ol the lecture class was felt 
lo he a deterrent to effective learning 
and when the Speech Department pro- 
posed the I V idea, the /oology Depart- 
ment decided to trv it. 

(lasses were limited to 4X students. 
Dr. George W. Wharton. Head of 
Zoology, appeared before the television 
cameras at nine and again at ten on 
fuesdays and Thursdays to present the 
course material. Each class was super- 
vised by a graduate assistant and at 
the end of each lecture ten minutes 
was provided lor discussion and ques- 
tions. 

The 960 students enrolled in the 
course were divided into 20 lecture sec- 
tions, each of which was divided into 
two laboratory sections. Four well- 
equipped laboratories were used con- 
currently to fit in the 40 laboratory 
sections. 




schedi iip (ok compli nos i vri v in 1461. th, I niversity'i newest building will he 
''" <■ M "/./ run ol the campus. It will home the CoUegt <■' Business and 

Public Administration and will he complete with such conveniences as an elevator 
(the building rises in, stories above the ground floor) and air conditioning. $121,000 
has been appropriated to equip tuch mod lies as thi punch ear, I and elec- 

mputing classroom i large lecture hall will accommodate 506 persons, 
will be nearly thirty classrooms and more than \i\t\ offices in the completed 
bulldii II as numerous i rooms, seminars and laboratories. Total 

■'. Booth 'del , a\,di and 

William I l< ■ ■■ of Salisi ittei \4i Booth is himself a graduate of the 

B r I colli .-. i las 




Mr. Lappin 



Lappin Now Consultant 

Robinson Lappin, University Manager 
or Food Services and Director of the 
Washington. D. C, Restaurant Asso- 
ciation, has been appointed to a newly- 
created administrative post at Maryland. 
His new position is consultant on food 
service development. 

In this post, Lappin will direct food 
facilities expansion on the College Park 
and Baltimore campuses. The newly 
appointed food consultant will have ad- 
ministrative responsibilities in which 
the broad overview of operating effi- 
ciency and effectiveness will be the 
primary concern. 

Lappin has been associated w ith the 
University for the past 1 2 years. Before 
coming to College Park, he directed 
the housing and feeding of the Armed 
Forces in the Washington Metropolitan 
area. In addition, he served for 18 years 
as manager of a hotel operated by the 
Union Trust Company. 

A native of Washington. D. < 
Lappin has lived in the State of Mary- 
land for the past 30 years. 

He holds memberships in many pro- 
fessional, civic and service organiza- 
tions. A public relations Director for 
the Chef's Society of Washington, he is 
also Vice President of the National 
Association of College and Universitv 
Food Services. He is a member of the 
Stewards and Caterers, Hotel Grecters 
and Hotel Sales Managers Associations; 
and Rotary. In addition, he is a mem- 
ber of the retirement committee of the 
Maryland Classified Employees Associa- 
tion. 



the Mar viand Magazine 



During World War II, Lappin was 
Manager ol ihc United Nations Service 
Center in Washington, an establishment 
tor the uniformed personnel ol all 
branches ol the military service ol the 
U. S. and its allies Ihree and one-hall 
million servicemen and women knew bj 
experience the hospitality ol this world 
famous institution. 



New Bibliography Published 

A bibliography containing 1,71)7 entries 
00 plasma physics and magnelohydro- 
dynamics, the first hook to be compiled 
00 the subject, has been published by 
the University ol Maryland. 

The new bibliography contains, in 
addition to subject titles, an authors 
index, a numerical index to internation- 
al atomic energy reports, and a list of 
journals referred to in the bibliography. 
It was compiled by James D. Ramer 
who was the librarian of the University 
of Maryland Engineering and Physical 
Sciences Library until his appointment 
to a similar post at Columbia Univer- 
sity last year. 

According to Professor Johannes M. 
Burgers, Acting Head of the Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Math- 
ematics, experiments in magnetohydro- 
dynamics, the motion of electrically 
conducted fluids subjected to magnetic 
forces, were conducted in the 19th cen- 
tury. It has been, however, only in the 
last two decades that the field has 
attracted wide attention. 



PG Alumni Get Together 

More than 200 Prince Georges County 
alumni, including husbands, wives and 
sweethearts, attended a dessert and cof- 
fee hour on March 18 at the Student 
Union. 

The program featured a premier 
showing of a new film of Terrapin 1959 
football highlights, followed by Coach 
Tom Nugent's prognostications for the 
I960 season. The mentor's first appear- 
ance before the county group was en- 
thusiastically received and, no doubt, 
few of the PG alumni will be absent 
as the season unfolds. 

Another highlight of the two-hour 
meeting was an exhibit of Hawaiian art 
by Earnest Cory, Jr., until his retirement 
State Entomologist and Head of the 
University's Department of Entomology. 
Dr. and Mrs. Cory have just returned 
from Hawaii and, on the basis of the 
beautiful color and scenes from the new 



slate depicted skilllulls l>\ the artist, a 
tew alumni are known to have consult- 
ed travel folders the next day 

In addition to man) well-known 

laces, on hand tO greet the lormci grads 

were Alumni Executive Secretary Dave 
Brigham, Alumni Field Secretary Vic 

Holm. Alumni Council President Harry 
Boswell and their wives. 

Preceding the program, the following 
County alumni were re-elected to the 
Prince Georges County Alumni Board: 
Bill Hoff, Chairman, and Nick Nicholas. 
Si Perkins, "Doc" Cronin, Louise Sud- 
low Hoyert, Frank Claggett, Hazel 
Temmler, Egbert F. Tingley and Tom 
Orpwood, all Directors. 




Dr. Darkis 

Alumnus Elected V. P. 

Dr. F. R. Darkis, A & S '24, has been 
elected a Vice President of the Liggett 
& Myers Tobacco Company. 

Dr. Darkis, Director of Research, was 
elected a Director of the Company in 
1956. He originally came to Liggett & 
Myers in 1928. In 1933, he went to 
Duke University as Tobacco Research 
Associate in the Chemistry Department, 
and he returned to Liggett & Myers in 
1947 as Director of Research. Today, he 
directs a staff of highly specialized sci- 
entific personnel in the Company's Re- 
search Laboratories in Durham, North 
Carolina. Dr. Darkis, who comes from 
Frederick, Maryland, received his B.S., 
M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. He is married to the 
former Mildred Morris of Salisbury, 
Maryland. They have two sons, Fred- 
erick R. Darkis, Jr., and Thomas M. 
Darkis and one daughter, Barbara 
Darkis Blake. 



Research on Strontium-90 

\ s.iic. effective and inexpensive 
method foi reduc ing Strontium 90 • re 
suiting from radiation fall > -ut i in milk 
has been developed by Di loseph SM 
verman, Associate Professoi >>i < hem 
ical i ngineering al the I Diversity, 

I )i . Silverman carried out research 
on the process as ,i membei ol Radia 

turn Applications, Inc ., a technical In in 
that specializes in chemical, plastics, 
and nuclear research for industrial uses 
In the new process, excess calcium 
phosphate, to which Strontium-90 can 

be caused to attach itself, is introduced 

into the milk. The mixture is heated to 
pasteurizing temperatures which makes 
the excess calcium compound more sol- 
uble. This, in turn, causes the Stronti- 
um- 1 )!) to be distributed in the new 
calcium as well as in the normal cal- 
cium content of the milk. When the 
solution is cooled, the excess calcium 
is precipitated out and automatically 
carries with it the unwanted Strontium- 
90. 

Dr. Silverman explains that the pro- 
cess is economical "primarily because 
it can be easily applied to a dairy's 
normal pasteurization process in a 
number of ways that are consistent with 
current milk-processing practice." In 
addition, the cost of calcium phosphate 
is low. 

Radiation Applications, Inc. is now 
working on plans to conduct pilot plant 
work for the new process. 



Byrus wins Service Award 

Robert C. Byrus, Director of the 
Fire Service Extension, has been pre- 
sented the distinguished service award 
of the National Fire Protection Asso- 
ciation. 

The award is made by the officers, 
directors and staff of NFPA to express 
appreciation to those who have ren- 
dered outstanding service to the asso- 
ciation. 



Miss Coleman is Princess 

Virginia Anne Coleman was the Prin- 
cess from the University of Maryland 
for the Apple Blossom Festival in Win- 
chester, Virginia, April 28-30. Miss 
Coleman, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Tracy Coleman, of Silver Spring. 
Maryland, is a sophomore at the Uni- 
versity. Her mother was graduated from 
the University of Maryland and her 
father is also a graduate. 



May-June, 1960 




Dr. Pennington 

Pennington Elected by ASM 

Dr. William A. Pennington. Professor 
ol Metallurgy, has been elected National 
\ ice-President of the American Society 
tor Metals and will serve in this capacity 
lor one year. Metallurgy at the Univer- 
sity is part of the Department of Chem- 
ical Engineering. 

Alter graduating from Union Univer- 
sity. Jackson. Tennessee, with a B.S. 
degree with a major in chemistry. Dr. 
Pennington served tour years as prin- 
cipal of Spring Hill High School. Tren- 
ton, Tennessee. He then started graduate 
work at Iowa State College, receiving 
the Ph.D. in physical chemistry and 
metallurgy. 

He returned to his former alma mater 
as Head of the Department of Mathe- 
matics for a period of one year. At this 
time he started a period of 20 years of 
service in industrial research — as re- 
search engineer for Armco Steel Cor- 
poration in Middletown. Ohio, as an 
industrial fellow at Mellon Institute of 
Industrial Research. Pittsburgh. Pa., and 
as chief chemist and metallurgist at the 
Carrier Corporation. Syracuse. New 
York. 

It was in the last position that he 
invented the first commercial azeotropic 
(constant boiling mixture) refrigerant. 
Carrene 7. now known generally as 
Refrigerant 500. It is believed to be 
still the only commercial azeotropic 
refrigerant used in this country, and 
perhaps in the world. 

In 1954 he returned to leaching as 
professor of metallurgy at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. One of his recent 
Ph.D. graduates. Dr. Henr\ I rankel of 
the National Bureau of Standards pre- 
sented a paper "Fatigue Properties of 



High Strength Steel' at the recent an- 
nual meeting ot the American Society 
foi Met. ils in ( KicagO. 

One ot the editors ol the maga/me 
Iron Age has said (hat he regards this 
work as ihe metallurgical contribution 
ot the year; the paper was taken from 
the doctoral thesis which was done 
under l)r Pennington's direction. 



Scholarship Gift 



A gilt ol $1,000 lor agricultural schol- 
arships has been given to the Um\er- 
sity by the Christian R. and Mary F. 
Lindback Foundation. 

Ihe $1,000 gift is the second to be 
received by the University under the 
will of Christian R. Lindback. late Pres- 
ident of Abbott Dairies. Inc. The foun- 
dation, established to help college stu- 
dents through scholarships, gave a sim- 
ilar gift in 1958. 



Dr. Dewey Takes New Post 

Dr. Charles S. Dewey. Assistant Pro- 
lessor of Chemistry from 1946-1959, 
retired this year from his position at 
Maryland to accept a post at Dakota 
Wesleyan University. Mitchell, South 
Dakota. Dr. Dewey, who now heads the 
Chemistry Department at Dakota Wes- 
leyan, writes that he has "the expecta- 
tion (and challenge) of a substantial 
and sound growth of its scope of opera- 
tions during the immediate future. It is 
a fascinating and demanding job." 



University College Students 
do Better on Campus 
Than off 

A survey of students who have studied 
on and off campus with the University 
of Maryland revealed that their on 
campus grades were slightly higher. 
This study, just recently concluded 
under the direction of Brig. Gen. T. D. 
Stamps. USA. Ret.. University College 
Assistant Dean for Military Studies, in- 
cluded 144 cases — all of them on 
campus "Bootstrap" graduates who had 
previously taken work off campus with 
the University o\ Maryland. 

The over-all average for courses taken 
on campus was 3.201 (above a B) com- 
pared to the 3.055 grade average made 
oil campus by the same students. 

Bootstrap students are military per- 
sonnel who are sent to the campus on 
a temporary duty basis for the purpose 



ol completing college degrees Most of 
them are officers, are married, and have 
families. The a\erage rank is Major. A 
bootstrap student recedes his regular 
salar\ while attending school, but each 
pa\s his own tuition and fees 



Scholarly Work Published 

A book published recently by the Uni- 
versity ol Wisconsin Press contains con- 
tributions by 19 scholars of international 
importance. 

Entitled "Boundary Problems in Dif- 
ferential Equations." the work contains 
papers delivered at a symposium under 
the same title. Dr. Joaquin B. Diaz, Re- 
search Professor in the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, is one of the contributors. 



New Library Collections 

Scrapbooks containing newspaper clip- 
pings compiled by the League of Wo- 
men Voters of Maryland were recently 
presented to the McKeldin Library by 
League President Mrs. Edward J. Sat- 
terthwaite. The scrapbooks contain clip- 
pings on the suffrage movement in the 
1917-1920 period, with information 
about women who worked for the 19th 
amendment in Maryland: the Pan 
American Conference of Women, in 
which Carrie Chapman Cad was prom- 
inent; pre-election activities for the 
1928 election, and league activities up 
to 1940. 

A complete set of the histories of 25 
Chinese dynasties was presented to the 
Library by the Government of the 
Republic of China. The presentation 
was made by Dr. George K. C. Yeh. 
Chinese ambassador to the United 
States. The gift was accepted on behalf 
of the University by President Elkins. 
The histories comprise 934 volumes 
and are the only standard general his- 
tory of China. 



GED Test Limit Announced 

University College officials have an- 
nounced that after April 30. 1960. no 
credit will be allowed for students who 
take the college level General Educa- 
tion Development tests within one cal- 
endar year of their graduation. 

In hardship cases, students taking 
GED tests during the final calendar year 
may petition to have a maximum ot six 
hours of that credit awarded. However, 
this permission would automatically 
preclude any other waiver allowances 



the Mar viand Magazine 



wm 




total contributions to the Greater University of Maryland Fund keep climbing — in 
April the Fund reached $364,000. Mrs. Elsie Martin, research assistant in the Office of 
Endowment and Development, records the rising line. 



for correspondence courses, working at 
other colleges, and special examinations. 
Education advisers have been re- 
quested to urge all students to take the 
GED tests as soon as possible after 
entering the Maryland program. 



Grants for Research 

A partial list of recent grants to the 
University which aid in continuing re- 
search and special programs include: 

From the National Science Founda- 
tion: $9,630 for scholarships to students 
participating in research programs; $11,- 
550 to the Physics Department for sum- 
mer science training for secondary 
school students and research participa- 
tion for teacher training program; 
$30,000 to support a summer institute 
of the University during which ten for- 
eign biologists will lecture at colleges 
and universities throughout the nation. 



A grant of $22,388 from the Atomic 
Energy Commission to the Physics De- 
partment will purchase equipment to 
train senior students in a one-year 
atomic and nuclear energy course. 

The National Academy of Sciences 
has made a grant of $8,428 to the De- 
partment of Microbiology for the clas- 
sification of compounds effective in the 
destruction of molds. 



Dr. Benarde Honored 

Dr. Melvin A. Benarde, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Zoology at the University's 
Seafood Processing Laboratory in Cris- 
field, was elected a fellow of the Ameri- 
can Public Health Association at that 
body's annual meeting in October. Dr. 
Benarde is well known through the pub- 
lication in scientific journals of his re- 
search findings at the Seafood Labora- 
tory. 



Alumni ( ommencement 
1 vents 

( ommencemenl will soon in.uk ih< 
end of anothei i diversity yeai Man) 
pre commencemenl activities are crowd 
mg the warm spring weeks marked by 
nostalgic reunions oi formei students 
who return again briefly to well remem- 
bered (though perhaps greatly changed) 
campus In -vi ass 

As this issue goes to press, .ilumni 
reunions on the College Park campus 

have already occurred (a lull report 
will be carried in the July- August issue). 
Uusmess meetings, a barbecue lunclieon. 
athletic events, anil class reunions oc- 
cupied returning "old grads" lor the 
entire day, May 7. 

May 19, alumni honored a favorite 
figure on the Maryland scene lor the 
past 36 years: H. Burton Shipley, the 
colorful baseball coach who this year 
is retiring. A reception and dinner ssere 
held in the Statler Hilton Hotel in 
Washington, D. ('. 

A look into activities planned for 
the immediate future reveals that the 
professional schools have scheduled 
programs for their graduates beginning 
on or after the first of June. Scientific 
programs and banquets will keynote the 
activities. It is expected that a great 
deal of interest will be generated by 
the many changes in the physical plant 
on the Baltimore campus. 

The Medical School Alumni Day is 
planned for June 2. A new faculty, 
many new academic innovations, and 
a most interesting research program 
await alumni inspection. The afternoon 
is reserved for class reunions and the 
banquet and dance in the Lord Balti- 
more Hotel will climax the events of 
the day. 

June week for Dental alumni begins 
June 1 with an Omicron Kappa Upsilon 
convocation and banquet at the Lord 
Baltimore Hotel. A business meeting, 
scientific program and academic pro- 
gram fill out the serious side of the 
program. In addition there will be din- 
ing and dancing and an afternoon of 
golfing and swimming. 

A banquet, dance and reunion are 
scheduled for alumnae of the Nursing 
School, with senior students as invited 
guests at the festivities. Nurses and 
nurses-to-be will assemble the evening 
of June 3 at the Emerson Hotel. 

One of the first functions to be held 
in the new Baltimore Student Union 
will be the Alumni Banquet and Dance 
of the School of Pharmacy. A convo- 
cation June 2 will precede the banquet 
and members of senior class will join 
in the activities of the evening. 



May-June, 1960 







DECISIVE ISSUES II 



Spring Convocation Address to the Students and Faculty 
of the University by President Wilson H. Elkins. 



Last spring when plans were being made for convoca- 
tions, there was an optimistic outlook by members of 
the Public Functions Committee. They envisioned the 
national political candidates seeking a platform from which 
to announce their versions of how the world could be saved 
lor posterity ioi which you are a part), and whv youth 
should take up the banners for liberal conservatism or con- 
servative-liberalism. To the dismav of our convocation plan- 
ners, the Republicans decided to enter the race with only one 
horse in the starting gate, and the Democrats have been so 
bus) jockeying tor position that they have not got on to the 
track. In an) event, you have been spared the clarion calls 
ot those openh aspiring to the highest office, and the beguil- 
ing tones of those who, tor obvious reasons, prefer a draft 
at next sumnicr's convention. 

So the Convocation Committee has called upon the avail- 
able reserve. I thank you tor responding so generously, and 
I hope thai you will not be disappointed bj a plain and 
frank talk on some ot the issues m higher education which 

relate 10 your welfare and thai ot future generations. 



Since talking to you last year, nothing of a revolutionary 
nature has happened at the University of Marvland — except 
the size of the crop of freshmen, the Kingston Trio, the 
victory over Clemson. and the burning of the Music Hall. 
And I do not anticipate anything very startling during the 
coming year. Obviously, there have been some changes and 
innovations, and it seems to me that they have been im- 
provements. Students from elementarv school through col- 
lege are studying more and quite naturally the> are com- 
plaining more. Some oi them even are beginning to analvze 
thoughtfully their teachers and administrators, and if there 
wasn't such a shortage in the educational field many ot us 
might be getting quite nervous. But this hasn't reached anv 
significant proportions, and education goes on what some 
call its complacent way. Actually, it would be tragic if edu- 
cation were to tremble and shake with everv distant rumble. 
tor this would result in changes poorly conceived, inade- 
quatelv planned, and often harmful. The very nature of 
education necessitates an evolutionary process, responding to 
the fundamental needs of man and his environment. 



s 



the Maryland Magazine 






IIGHER EDUCATION 



Surely, the physical changes that are taking place call for 
a continuous study of the educational system and its various 
divisions and programs. The flight of the Soviet Russian Bear 
into space gave us pause to look at the condition of our 
society and, for the moment at least, more and better scientific 
education appeared to be the answer for our deficiencies. 
This was a tribute to the importance of education, but it 
was not a careful analysis of the situation. If, eventually, it 
causes the people to devote their attention to the value of 
hard work, honesty, and quality, American education will 
be strengthened immeasurably as a part of a virile society. 
Some of the signs are encouraging, but some of them are 
beginning to nicker after a little contact with the sterner 
elements which enhance the quality of education or any 
worthwhile enterprise. 

The people want education, and more education they will 
get either from the local community, the State or the Federal 
government, but the unanswered question is what kind of 
education will the people demand, support and defend. 

During the past two years, thousands of speeches and 



articles have been heard and written on the subject of educa- 
tion. The authors have been as heterogeneous as the enroll- 
ment of a public university. They have agreed on only one 
point, namely, that there are more students today than ten 
years ago, and that the present number in the colleges will 
double in the next ten years. Committees have been appointed 
at all levels to enlighten and frighten the public. These groups 
have discussed curricula, facilities, instruction, research, 
admissions, performance, standards, cheating, football and 
finance. The resulting reports have had a good effect on 
education for, if nothing else, they have enabled the schools 
and colleges to require a higher level of performance without 
being crucified by the parents and by influential friends. It 
would seem from many reports and comments that the public 
has just awakened to the realization that education is the 
foundation of a free and prosperous society. The task before 
us is to strengthen and perpetuate this revival of interest in 
intellectual and spiritual growth, and to prove by action that 
the cry for quality and the fulfillment of democratic ideals 
is not just a shallow response to the Russian menace. 



May-June, 1960 



M 



ssi oi mi mi isim ism is which .ire being discussed 
•i immediate concern to all ol us. and thev will have a 
lasting effect upon tins University '"ton the students, who 
toon will entei the intricate, competitive, and demanding 
economic and social order, arc directly involved. Despite 
this obvious fact, the voice ol the students on matters ol 
greal import have been, lor the most part, unheard and 
unsolicited It the students have an opinion on the present 
and future ol higher education. thev should express it. even 
though it may be vetoed by the faculty or the administration 
Vetoes are powerful deterrents but the> are not always 
sustained. In improving the quality ol higher education and 
making it available to all who are qualified, is it too much 
to ask university students to think about the meaning ol 
excellence, the need lor standards, the means ol financing 
puhhc higher education, curricula tor the international citi- 
zens, and the values which have sustained humanity through 
the ages. I do not propose th.it you alone should decide the 
issues which are so important to your welfare. I do believe, 
however, that you should form opinions and that you should 
express them so that they may he considered along with the 
reports and recommendations of others interested in higher 
education. In this connection, it is encouraging to read recent 
issues ot the Diamondback which contain articles on im- 
portant educational subjects, lor example, the proposal of 
the Student dov eminent Association to restudy the examina- 
tion schedule in an effort to avoid too many examinations in 
a two- or three-day period is a problem which should elicit 
student opinion. 

In the voluminous educational literature of recent months, 
the word "excellence" appears over and over again. Every- 
body is pursuing ■excellence."' which reminds me of a meet- 
ing several nights ago when one of the participants got up. 
alter a protracted discussion of the gifted student, and said 
that he would like to say a few words for the "ungifted." All 
ot us know that the word excellence was not coined after 
Sputnik, but it has assumed, since Sputnik, a more general 
meaning. The exhortations to excellence may be a bit con- 
tusing to those who had thought of it in terms of something 
superior or far above the average. This common definition 
ot the term could he discouraging to the average student who 
has httle hope of achieving superiority. For that reason, the 
term needs clarification. In the context of recent statements, 
the speakers and writers are saving that excellence means 
performance in accordance with capacity and that an institu- 
tion which requires a reasonable level oi performance and 
provides the kind of environment, personnel, and facilities 
which are conducive to performance on a high level is in 
pursuit ot excellence. The Academic Probation Plan is a case 
in point. It has contributed to the betterment of this institu- 
tion: it has stimulated effort; it has encouraged the serious 
and qualified students who have given it enthusiastic support: 
hut it is onlv ont: factor in the character of the University. 

1 here are many factors which contribute to an excellent 
educational program. Perhaps the most important is self- 
discipline. Ihis is a basic requirement, and it is .1 verv real 
issue where freedom ot choice prevails. The lack of sell- 



discipline is a major handicap in college. It is often the cause 
ol failure, and. to a verv considerable extent, it deprives the 
student ot realizing his full potentiality. Self-discipline is 
developed under conditions that require the full use of 
individual talents, and the institution — home or school or 
college — which fails to demand the application of talent is 
doing a disservice to the individual and to societv. In assisting 
the student to develop selt-disciplme. the institution must 
define its objectives in a manner that indicates dearly who 
it intends to serve. I he University cannot serve evervone. 
regardless of capacity or interest. In fairness to those who 
have ability to do college work and who are willing to disci- 
pline themselves, the unfit and unwilling must be encouraged 
to find more compatible quarters. 

In order for anyone to measure the achievement of the 
principal university product — its students — standards are 
essential. Unfortunately, the quantitv of work and specific 
grade requirements are often mistaken as standards for aca- 
demic courses. When the University adopted the Probation 
Plan, it was not adopting a standard of instruction, but a 
minimum grade requirement within the standards set and 
maintained by the faculty. It this has led to higher standards 
of instruction, it has been a by-product which is relative to 
the standards which were existing when the Probation Plan 
was adopted. It is not logical to assume that there was a need 
to set higher standards. The determination of any measure- 
ment should be related to the end in view. As the pressure 
has mounted for better education. I have observed a notice- 
able increase in the amount of work expected of the students. 
in elementarv grades, high school, and college. In some *. 
the amount has had little, if any. relation to an adequate 
standard and has compounded the difficulties instead of 
helping the students. Fxtraneous and useless material has 
been added on the apparent assumption that quantity would 
result in quality. There is an urgent need to avoid this unde- 
sirable action, lest we get further from the goal of excellence. 
There is an urgent need to maintain identifiable standards 
which can be justified and clarified. 

In some courses of study, it is relatively easv to determine 
what should be learned and to set objective measurements: 
in others it is more difficult. There is no excuse, however, 
for any course to be a guessing game or to depend upon 
the mood of the instructor at examination time. Naturally, 
there will always be a wide range in the effectiveness of 
instructors — even administrators — but the standard for a 
specific course should be the same, or approximate^ the 
same, for all instructors. Only in this way is it possible to 
measure fairly and reliably the knowledge of the students 
and the effectiveness of teaching. Only in this way can we 
determine whether a student in elementary, high school, or 
college is ready for advancement. 



T 



HE MAINTENANCE OF PROPER STANDARDS will go a long 

wav in correcting the weaknesses in American education. We 
do not need to copy the ways of other countries: we need 
simply to straighten out some oi the kinks so that we can 
go down a straight road toward a recognizable goal. Standards 
will not take the place of good teachers, but they will enable 
the teachers and the students to do a better job: and they will 
help the parents and the public to understand what we are 
doing. 

Another issue which is being debated vigorously is: who 
should pav the cost oi education' The participants are not 
entirely unbiased (including the educators 1. nor do they 



10 



1111 M \r\ 1 wn M \gazim 



m 



include a fair representation ol those who pay the bills 
Sonic are uninformed and others have nol analyzed the 
economic status ol the students, although I suspect thai 
some ol those who argue for substantially higher tuitions 
ha\o been looking enviously at the automobiles which crowd 
iIk- campuses V fevi proponents of higher tuition represent 
the old school which holds to the belie! that only .1 high!) 
selected group should be allowed to go to college, rhe vast 
majority, however, subscribe overtly to the generally accepted 
philosophy that ever) person should be given an opportunity 
to develop his capacity regardless of financial stains. Now. 
We all know that complete equality of opportunity is a myth. 
I here are too many uncontrollable factors. Hut we should 
attempt to approach the ideal; and it is strange to hear men 
Of the Iwentieth Century suggesting that the ideal can be 
attained by requiring the student to make lull payment for 
instruction. If the scholarship proposal were accepted for 
those unable to pay their way. there would be a majority of 
scholarship students. Eventually, as others quit work to live 
oil the bounty, most of the students would be getting help. 
As a practical solution to the financing of higher education, 
the full-pay-scholarship plan is a specious argument. Actually, 
it would result in the denial of opportunity to hundreds of 
thousands of students and would deny society the benefits 
of a citizenry educated to meet the demands of 1960 or of 
the year 2000. 

As a public institution, the University is obligated to pro- 
vide education to all who are qualified and seek admission. 



lo carry out tins obligation, the governing Board 

attempted to keep the COSt within reach ol most ol the 
people I he Hoard ol Regents is well aw.ue ol the l.iel that 
at least one-hall ol llie Students help to support themselves 

Some work part time and some try to work full-time and 

carry a full academic load. (A lew ol the latter group are 
no longer with us. I Under the circumstances, any majoi 
change in the lees policy would deny education lo some. 
delay graduation tor others, and probably weaken the pel 

formance of many who might seek to earn more money 

The Board of Regents is well aware ol these problems. While 
avoiding increases that would be penalizing and detriinent.il 
the members have been cognizant ol the increasing cost ol 
education and changing economic conditions. Small increases 
have been approved periodically. I am reasonably sure that 
you can expect some modest increases in the future which 
are consistent with the increase in real family income — 
and the length of the cars which you drive to school. I hope, 
however, that they will not be excessive. 

As in the past, the State government will be asked to provide 
the main support of the University, with, perhaps, an increas- 
ing amount coming from the Federal government for research 
and physical facilities. In the last analysis, the outcome ol 
this important issue will be determined by the people. If suffi- 
cient funds are provided by the legislatures, the individual 
student will not have to bear the main burden. In view of 
this fact, the voice of the parents — present and future — is 
of crucial significance. Others, who do not represent the 




ne .'i the working itudent, arc pro- 
: i,,.ii tuition for public colleges and 
, .,ii increase could happen h> default it 
lirectly involved fail to express their convic 

In regard I ppropriations, we are encouraged by 

mmendationa ol the Governor and b> a Legislature 

istently supported a Greater University. It the 

lature does no major damage to the current budget 

test, the University vmII operate with approximate!) 

00,000 more in 1960-1961 than in the current year. 

More than one-hall Oi this increase uill gi) to faCUlt) salaries 

ami foi neu positions to take care oi an estimated 8-10 
percent increase in enrollment Regardless oi the outcome. 

it is comforting to know that highest priority has been given 
to teaching and research which loom so large in the degree 
ot excellence oi the University and which affect you so vitally. 

With respect to capital improvements, the University will 
need approximately $45,000,000 during the next ten >ears 
to provide lor enrollment increases and improvements. I Ins 
docs not include additional programs which may ho needed 
in a rapidly changing period. For the next fiscal year, 1961, 
the Governor has recommended approximately S3. 700,000, 
ol which $2,000,000 is allocated to the redevelopment of the 
Baltimore campus. At College Park, the recommendation 
would provide money to turnish the new Business and Public 
Administration Building, renovate the old BPA Building. 
furnish a new foreign language facility on which construction 
is scheduled for April or May. add an additional floor to the 
I'lnsics Building, provide planning funds for a new Infirmary, 
and planning funds for a ( lassroom-Auditorium Building to 
accommodate Speech. Art, Dramatics and Music. The latter 
has been badly needed for several years and now is on the 
emergency list. There is also $200,000 for improvement of 
the lire Service Extension area — no connection with the 
burning of the old Music Hall. 

In addition to the State appropriations, the University has 
extended credit to the students — secured by compulsory col- 
lateral — for the enlargement of the Union Building. If plans 
progress on schedule, construction should begin in May on 
a SI. 500.000 addition. This should be welcomed by the 
thousands of "Day Dodgers" and others for whom crowded 
conditions in the Snack Bar have created a minor crisis. 



A 



t this TIME, which is just the beginning of the bulge 
in enrollment, we are in pretty good condition excepting the 
need lor dormitory accommodations. But we are apprehen- 
sive about the future. Dean Borreson. with his flair for the 
dramatic, has said that conditions will be chaotic in 1961. 
I am not sure of what he means by chaotic, but one might 
envision a mad scramble for rooms in September without 
regard to class or sex Indeed, this would be chaos, and it 
would be exciting. Howe\er true the Dean"s picturesque 
description may be. the condition is going to be unsatisfac- 
tory. We shall not have any additional accommodations for 
girls in 1960 and places lor only about 400 more men by 
the end of the year. And unless there is an immediate change 
m State planning, there will not be a single room added for 

1961. This means that the University must severely restrict 
OUt-of-State enrollment Mam will be required to commute 
who would preler to live on campus. Worst of all. rooms will 



have to be denied to some Maryland residents who cannot 
commute. The University is exploring all possibilities tor 
linancing construction ol additional dormitories with State. 
I ederal or private kinds, but the prospects are not good. 
Although the issue is serious, do not get hysterical; your 
rooms will not be taken. 

I here is some sunshine in the midst of these dark fore- 
bodings. Alter long and tedious planning, followed by bids 
in excess ol the monev available, a contract will be let to 
begin the first ol a new group of men*s dormitories on the 
north side ol the campus. In this agricultural setting, tar 
Irom the influence of women, we expect a large number ot 
men to find contentment. The dormitories will be broken 
into small units and there will be a separate dining facility 
for each fifteen hundred students living in a quadrangle ot 
tour- and eight-story buildings. (Elevators may pros ide 
another excuse lor getting to class later or not getting there 
at all.) In order to avoid some ot the disadvantages of mass 
feeding, the plan calls for dining units accommodating seventy 
students. Formal dress will be optional. This will be the new 
look for the future in dormitory accommodations, and it is 
a good example of how the University is trying to create a 
favorable climate for living and learning. It is a recognition 
of the fact that education on a high level must concern itself 
with the social and physical as well as the intellectual develop- 
ment of the individual. 

The welfare of the individual demands that the Universitv 
continue to pursue endlessly the building of an institution 
with all of the resources to provide the best in teaching, 
research, and service. Anything short of this goal during a 
period when an increasing percentage of high school grad- 
uates will enter the State University will impair the progress 
oi the State. Additions and changes will take place from time 
to time, but to be meaningful they must fit into the whole 
plan. The plan cannot be drawn as a picture, for it contains 
many intangibles. Actually, it is more like a bright horizon 
which continues to recede as we approach it. It is made up 
of students, teachers, scholars, administrators, staff, alumni, 
buildings, equipment, standards, requirements, regulations, 
courses, programs, curricula, organizations, activities, honestv . 
integrity, and spirit. And. in the quest for clarity, each element 
must contribute to the fulfillment of the central purpose. 

Spirit is the soul of the institution. It is the cohesive element 
and it is the strongest force behind the conduct of the partici- 
pants. It is born of attitude. In the history class, as in football 
or any sport, attitude is often the determining factor. Abilitv 
and background are primarv essentials, but given the founda- 
tion, achievement depends upon the will to do. It involves .< 
sense of belonging, a feeling that it is important for the 
individual to contribute to the group as well as to serve 
self. It forbids the individual to cheat his classmates or his 
opponent as it decries dishonest) wherever it may be found. 
It is something which transcends the excitement of an athletic 
contest, and extends to all competition where it is a binding, 
rousing and sustaining force through adversity and sue. 
It is often called "morale" which, if effective, pervades the 
whole community. It is nourished by understanding, coopera- 
tion, and friendly relations between all who have a part 
to play . 

It is this elusive, tantalizing, intangible spirit, along with 
people, programs and physical facilities which make up a great 
universitv. If I am asked. "Where are we going at the Uni- 
versitv of Maryland," 1 answer that we are always moving 
toward the goal of putting all of the pieces together which 
contribute to an ideal climate oi learning. It is an exciting, 
rewarding and never-ending journey. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



^kflLaU 



t fr I * * * •- ? * 



' .-' ... A 1 






it is no longer unusual /<; photograph University of Maryland 
graduates against a background of Japanese architecture. Only 
those graduates present for the commencement exercises are shown; 
the graduating class totaled 62. 



Far East Division Graduates 62 



SIXTY-TWO PERSONS JOINED THE BODY OF MARYLAND 
alumni March 27, but all of them were miles from their 
alma mater. 

Thirty-nine of them (the rest previously transferred) were 
gathered in Kudan Kaikan Auditorium, Tokyo, Japan, to 
receive bachelor's degrees culminating years of effort. One man 
— M/Sgt. Thomas C. McGary of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa 
— began his college work 23 years ago. Of the 23 degrees 
awarded in absentia, one was a master's degree, awarded to 
Air Force Col. John O. Moench. Col. Moench received a 
bachelor's degree in 1957. 

The occasion was that of the third annual commencement 
of the Far East Division. Candidates for degrees gathered 
from Japan, Taiwan, Okinawa and Korea. There were, in 
addition, about 1,000 persons present who witnessed the con- 
ferring of degrees by Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the 
University. Presiding over the program was Dr. Ray Ehrens- 
berger, Dean of the University College which administers the 
Overseas Programs. Assisting Dr. Elkins in conferring degrees 
were Dr. Mason G. Daly, Director of the Far East Division, 
who also brought greetings to the assembly; Dr. Leslie R. 
Bundgaard, Associate Director; and Gene H. Bundgaard of 
Admissions and Registrations. 

Appropriate to the Japanese-American setting for the 
occasion, the audience sang the national anthems of both 
Japan and the United States. His Excellency, Kotaro Tanaka, 

MRS. JOSEPHINE andreozzi, mother of four children, was first in 
line to receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts from President 
Elkins. 



Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Japan, was presented 
an honorary Doctor of Law degree. Dr. Tanaka spoke briefly 
to the gathering, following an introduction by United States 
Ambassador to Japan, Douglas MacArthur, II. 

Commencement speaker was General Emmett O'Donnell, 
Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Air Forces. General O'Donnell 
charged University of Maryland graduates with a vital respon- 
sibility in the further development of good U. S.-Far East 
ties. He went on to call on Maryland graduates to aid in 
convincing friends of the U. S. that America is a "worthwhile, 
reliable and helpful partner." 

He also said: "We seek a free world. The Communists 
want us out of Asia. And militarily speaking we want to be 
out of Asia. But . . . the United States seeks freedom for its 
friends . . . 

"Collective U. S. efforts have assisted the people of the 
Far East in their labors to rebuild war-torn economies and 
to attain improvements in their standard of living. The U. S. 
purpose in Asia is based on the concept that every human 
being possesses a dignity which must be respected and rights 
which must not be ignored." 

Graduation music was provided by the U. S. Navy Fleet 
Activities Band conducted by Herbert E. C. Weber, with 
choral music by the Nihon Women's University Chorus. 

A reception for the graduates, their families, invited guests, 
and dignitaries followed. 




Research at Maryland 



Aids Growth of South 




RESEARCH LABORATORIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MARY- 
land are helping produce the basic, raw material of 
progress which spells growth for the Southern United States 
in the decade of the Sixties. 

This research has attracted national attention. 

President Eisenhower wrote a personal letter of commen- 
dation to the University tor its work on instrumentation used 
in the nose cone ot the "Project Farside" rocket. That rocket 
put the first U. S. satellite in orbit. 

Research projects like those at the University of Maryland 
should inspire pride ot achievement in the region.'' said 
Governor Cecil H. Underwood of West Virginia, Chairman 
ol the Southern Regional Education Board. "Since research 
affects us all. we must see that all important fields of inquiry 
receive sufficient attention." 



This and other examples of successful university research 
are included in the Southern Regional Education Board's 
publication. "University Research — What It Means to the 
South.*" 

"I think research does mean a better Southern region. It 
could mean a position of leadership." said Governor Under- 
w ood . 

His conjecture is backed up by facts from a past decade of 
research in the area. 

Research has provided from 50 to 75 percent of the 250 
percent increase in per capita income in the 1 6-state SREB 
region since l^: -1 '. 

Basic research on long-chain polymers has resulted in the 
development of nylon, the manufacture of which is located 
almost exclusively in the South. 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



University research into the electrical behavior ol solids 
resulted in the development ol transistors, oi which .1 single 
Southern firm now provides one-third oi the nation's supply. 

More than halt oi the nation's chemical plants have located 
South of the Mason Dixon 1 mc in the last lew years a tad 
DOtewOrth) Since the chemical industry is one ol the most 

research-minded of all industries 

1 here are three major sources ol support lor research 
in the South government (national and state), industry and 
universities, 

Here we are primanK concerned with university research, 
tor universities ^o as much basic research (research without 
an immediate practical application) as industry and the Fed- 
eral government combined. As a matter of tact, the Federal 
government contracts with universities lor between 50 percent 
and 60 percent of its basic research work. 




It means many things to the people ol the region. It means 
more dollars in the economy. It means better health lor the 
present generations and those to follow. It means scientific 
advances in the fields ol nuclear energy and in the control 
of nature's elements. 

Reports from laboratories all over the South witness the 
diversified successes ol basic research. 




Universities, then, lead in the discovery of principles and 
processes which may be adapted to technological and economic 
purposes. 

"Our region needs the basic research our universities pro- 
duce," said Dr. Robert Anderson, Director of the SREB. 
"Without fundamental knowledge, and new breakthroughs 
into the unknown, all the applied research of our industries 
will become stymied before long. Without the new scientific 
talent which our universities produce, our whole way of 
life would come to a standstill." 

Research becomes increasingly important after a look at 
the region's potential. 

According to Dr. Harold C. Clark, an economist from 
Columbia University, the Southern United States is poten- 
tially the nation's richest region. Even a superficial survey of 
its geography and people shows vast, untapped resources. 

Expenditures for organized research in the South's publicly- 
supported universities have risen from $23 million to $58 
million in six years — from 8.5 percent to 12.6 percent of the 
educational and general budget. The national average is now 

16 percent. 

In spite of recent progress, however, the total amount spent 
for research in the South is still low in comparison with other 
regions. 

Though it holds 30 percent of the nation's population and 
23 percent of the nation's income, the South provides only 

17 percent of the nation's research. 

Or, from another angle, for every $100 of personal income 
in the South, seven cents is being expended on university 
research. This is less than the amount spent in the region 
for memberships in golf and country clubs. 

Research has a part in every area of modern day living. 
Dramatic examples of successful research are found in the 
areas of economics, sociology, the biological sciences and the 
physical sciences. 



More Dollars in the Economy 

BASK RESEARCH At WAYS PAYS Oil- IN ADDITIONS VO Mil 
general store of knowledge. Often it pays off in a dollars 
and cents profit many times bigger than the initial investment. 

The Municipal Technical Advisory Service in the Bureau 
of Governmental Research, College of Business and Public 
Administration of the University of Maryland, has made a 
number of studies which have been of real financial assist- 
ance to the taxpayers of Maryland communities. 

An outstanding example is a land-use study of the City 
of Laurel. In this project the Department of Geography 
cooperated with the Service in making a detailed study of 
present uses of all land within the City. On the basis of this 
study and other assistance provided, the City has been able 
to apply for a Federal planning assistance grant to develop 
a comprehensive plan for the future development of the 
community. 

In another significant case, the Town of District Heights 
obtained through the Service a study of land values, site 
planning, and cost studies for a Municipal Center. With this 
information the Town is now able to purchase land, project 
its financial planning, and develop architectural drawings 
for the Center at substantial savings. 

At the request of the City of Cumberland, the Service 
made a detailed study of salaries and wages for over 400 
municipal employees in order to develop a pay classification 
system, and job description for all city employees. Amend- 
ments to the City's Civil Service Code were drafted in order 
to implement the study. 

These services of the Municipal Technical Advisory Service 
are advisory in character and are available to all municipalities 
in the State on request. Since its organization in the Bureau 
in July 1959, the Service has undertaken 95 projects, includ- 
ing: codification of ordinances and charters, annexation 
studies, ordinance drafting, traffic studies, utility rate analyses, 
purchasing practices, salary surveys, municipal administrative 
reorganizations, accounting practices, municipal reporting 
techniques, and numerous other projects relating to municipal 
government. 

At the University of North Carolina's Fisheries Institute, 
research has uncovered techniques for oyster rehabilitation 
and has produced changes in shrimp fishing regulations, to 
name only two projects of the ten-year-old Institute. Its pro- 
gram of conservation and development of natural resources 
has been a boon to those who make their living from the sea. 



May-June, 1960 



75 



the shrimp fishing regulation* alone have to- 
ol North Carolina shrimp fishermen by 

; million ovei the p.>si eight yean 
uhsis .it Georgia lech mixed tome sand, lire and a 
new idea to come up with ■ ceramic material now being 
fashioned into the re-entry nose cone for missiles ["hey esti- 
mate that production Ol the material will produce a new 

(100 million a seal industry 

I he Ceramic is fused Silica made in a new. cheap (20 

cents a pound) way It can be used as exhaust nozzles lor 

lockets, as the casing fot an entire solid-fuel rocket or as 

the end ol a giant telescope 



Research Means Better Health 



Rl si VIU II IN llll BIOLOOICA1 VM> I'HYSK \I SCIENCES IS 
securing a hiture ol better health for the people ol the 
legion. Much ol this research has drawn national attention 
to the universities ol its origin. 

A researcher in the College of Agriculture at the Univer- 
sit\ ol Maryland, Dr. Mary S. Shorb. made the first isolation 
and crystallization of Vitamin B-12. This research led to 
the extensive development and use of plant ration growth 
promotants in humans to the alleviation of pernicious anemia. 
It has also resulted indirectly in the widespread use of anti- 
biotics in animal production. 

During World War II the Department of Chemistry at the 
University of Maryland cooperated with many governmental 
agencies in the conduct of research concerning chemical 
warfare, insect repellants and insecticides, and antimalarial 
drugs. 

The preparation of Pentaquine culminated one phase of 
work on anti-malarials. The drug was the forerunner of 
others now available which are truly curative drugs for 
malaria, not suppressives as are quinine and atebrine. 

For his achievements in the synthesis of this and many 
other anti-malarials. the late Dr. Nathan L. Drake received 
the Hillebrand prize of the Chemical Society of Washington. 

At Vanderbilt University a scientist working in anatomy 
and pediatrics received international acclaim a short time 
ago when he presented a paper on an electronically-controlled 
respirator to the International Conference on Medical Elec- 
tronics. 

That research resulted in an iron lung which breathes 
according to the patient's need for air, instead of an arbi- 
trarily determined rhythm. 

In 1952 researchers at the Medical College of Virginia 
found a reliable method of minimizing shock in the severelv 
burned patient. They devised the Evans formula which pre- 
dicts the type and amount of fluid a severely burned person 
needs during the first 48 hours of treatment. 

This. too. attracted national attention to the region. 



Nuclear Research 



Nl ( I I VR KIM-ARCH HAS BECOM1 \ VITA1 PART OF THE 
total research program in a number ol Southern uni- 
versities. It figures prominently in the areas oi medical 
research, space research, armaments and power production. 
Much promising research is now underway under the 
direction of Dr. S. Fred Singer, of the University ol Maryland. 



leader of the Upper Atmosphere and Cosmic Ray Research 
Croup, who is credited with development of a specific un- 
manned earth satellite proposal, called the '"MOUSE." 

When a one-and-a-half billion dollar atomic installation 
was constructed on a 3 1 5-square-mile tract along the Savan- 
nah River, the Atomic Energy Commission recognized that 
this would have serious effects on the natural life of the area 

For this reason, the University ol Georgia and the Univer- 
sity ot South Carolina were asked to study the plants and 
wild life in the area. They observed first-hand the effect of 
the Savannah River Project on nature's delicate balance of 
plants and animals, and kept a warv eve out for signs ot 
river pollution which would affect all forms of life, including 
man. 

Researchers have already noticed that the large quantities 
of hot water discharged into the creeks drive away fish, but 
at the same time, the warmer water further downstream pro- 
vides a Florida climate which increases fish food and makes 
fish multiply. 

Research into the use and development of atomic energv 
is being incorporated into the fields of medicine, agriculture, 
physics, engineering, chemistry and even art at Louisiana 
State University. 

Researchers there are following radioactive "tracers"' 
through the blood in cattle searching for the cause of ana- 
plasmosis, a dread livestock disease; following minerals 
through soils, plants and animals to analyze the effectiveness 
of fertilizer ingredients, and an LSUNO researcher is using 
tracers in an attempt to develop improved methods of sepa- 
rating fission product materials and impurities in uranium 
and thorium operations. 

At the University of Tennessee, a physics professor and 
one of his students have constructed a giant microscope to 
track tiny particles of nuclear explosions. 




Research Means Better 
Universities 

EIUCATORS HVVt HI IN VI VRMID FOR SOME TIME BY THE 
fact that such a large proportion of top students — those 
who win scholarships and fellowships in national competitions 
— choose to attend universities outside the Southern region. 
For example, in l l >56. from a total oi 556 National Merit 
Scholarship winners, only 16 percent went to Southern Insti- 
tutions. Some 157 Southern students, or 28 percent of the 
total, received scholarships. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 




After these students graduate, some of them will not return 
to the South to work, and in this way the region loses some 
of its most promising young people. This is even more true 
of superior faculty members, whose preference for a univer- 
sity depends heavily on an institution's research vitality. 
Whether or not they remain will often be decided by the 
richness and variety of research opportunities. 

There are numerous examples of outstanding research 
specialties in Southern universities. 

As was mentioned earlier, the outstanding success of 
"Project Farside" brought personal congratulations from Pres- 
ident Eisenhower to the University of Maryland physicist 
responsible for the design of the rocket's delicate instrument 
pay load. 

At Maryland, expenditures for pure and applied research 
climbed steadily from $897,484.14 in fiscal year 1949-50, to 
$5,194,335.08 in fiscal year 1958-59. 

Some examples of gifts and grants made available to the 
University within the first few months of 1960 are: 

$100,000 to the Agricultural Experiment Station from the 
Wye Plantation, Queenstown. Maryland, to conduct basic 
research related to beef cattle. 

$52,000 grant to the School of Pharmacy from the Cancer 
Institute, National Institutes of Health, to support a two-year 
steroid research program. 

$303,000 grant to the Department of Physics from the U. S. 
Signal Corps to support fundamental studies of the processes 
which occur in solid materials, including the interaction of 
electrons, sound waves and nuclei. 

$11,500 to the School of Medicine from the U. S. Public 
Health Service to study fungus infections of the yeastlike 
variety. 

$18,295 to Dr. Adalbert F. Schubart, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine and Head of the Division of Arthritis of the 
School of Medicine, for the study of abnormal serum factors 
in the blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 

Oklahoma State University's College of Engineering has 
achieved an international reputation for work on the mathe- 
matics of electromagnetic relay operations. 



The University of Virginia is one of several Southern 
institutions whose atomic research has attracted a great deal 
of attention from industry, the armed forces and the general 
public. Besides the Atomic Information Center for the public, 
the university is conducting research on nuclear agriculture, 
nuclear medicine and nuclear engineering. 

Programs of this kind tend to attract to university faculties, 
the men who are specialists in their fields and whose enthu- 
siasm for their work is a vital tool for teaching of future 
scientists and researchers. 

Industrial and scientific leaders across the nation are con- 
cerned with the question of research in American universities. 

"Years ago basic research was done largely in European 
laboratories; here we often implemented those findings with 
goods to be made and used," said Crawford Greenwalt, chem- 
ical engineer and President of DuPont, in a recent discussion 
of American research. "We can't rely on other countries to 
turn up such basic research for us. We must do this as well 
as applied research. Remember, new ideas are the things on 
which industrial science builds." 

DuPont spends some $70 million a year on research. Of 
that, probably 15-20 percent goes to basic research. But like 
other industrial concerns, much of its research must be in the 
fields directly related to industrial potential. That leaves the 
real task for the universities. 

But universities are not doing all they could because they 
don't have the money, Greenwalt said. 

The solution, he suggests, is that government and industry 
recognize the extraordinary merit in the unrestricted grant 
for research — that is, a grant to be used in any way chosen 
by the researcher. 

"You back a man you have confidence in and let him go 
to work. The organic chemist who discovered nylon didn't 
start out with any goal," said Mr. Greenwalt. 

"Fortunately the South has the raw materials for progress: 
students, faculty, and schools to help replenish the nation's 
dwindling supply of basic knowledge." said Dr. Robert Ander- 
son, director of the SREB. "It is up to us to determine how 
much of this raw material will be mined and used to fashion 
the plowshares of progress." 



May-June, 1960 



17 



Dr. Opik Awarded Medal by 
National Academy of Sciences 



* 



Di< i knsi I. oimk. VISITING RESI IRCH PROI i ssim II \< H- 
mg astrophysics and geophysics at the University, has 

been awarded the J. Laurence Smith Medal by the National 
Academy ol Sciences. The award, made in recognition of Dr. 
Opik's outstanding investigations oi meteoric bodies, was 
presented during the annual meeting of the Academy in 
Washington. D. C, in April. 

In the study of meteors and their fiery trace through the 
earth's atmosphere. Dr. Opik is a pioneer. On the basis ol 
research performed in the earlv 1920s, he worked out a 
theory for the interaction of high-speed bodies with the upper 
atmosphere. Opik's investigations were fundamental to an 
understanding of the ablation phenomenon — the peeling back 
of a meteor's surface as it vaporizes from the heat ol 
atmospheric friction. 

Since the nose cone of a rocket plunging back into the 
earth's atmosphere encounters the same destructive heat. 
Opik's original principles and observations were of incalcula- 
ble value to the designers of space vehicles in their success! ul 
search for solutions to the re-entrv problem. 

Dr. Opik's meteor studies have also contributed to a better 
understanding of comets and asteroids. A colleague noted. 
"Dr. Opik has certainly contributed the greatest amount of 
ingenuity and originality to the problem of any one living." 

In addition. Dr. Opik has made noteworthy contributions 
to other fields of astronomy and geophysics, among them 
studies of the planetary atmospheres of Mars. Venus and 
Jupiter, from which he has drawn conclusions about their 
surface properties. 

Considered by many to be his most significant is Dr. Opik's 
theory of the interior structure of stars. He analyzed the 
role of mixing of the material inside a star and showed that 
in most stars mixing is confined to a central region or "core." 
The outside layers do not mix. Therefore, the stellar furnace 
burns mainly at the expense of the hydrogen fuel of the core, 
and the lifetime of a star is many times shorter than it could 
be if all the fuel were available. The theory of unmixed 
stars offers a solution to the riddle ot giant stars. When the 
hydrogen in the core has been exhausted, the star expands 
to many times its former size and becomes a giant, with a 
superdense core and an inflated envelope. Dr. Opik has also 
applied the theory of unmixed stars to the sun. pointing out 
that resulting fluctuations of solar radiation may be the 
cause oi the earth's ice ages. 

Born on October 23. 1893 in Port Kunda. Estonia. Dr. 
Opik studied astrophysics at Moscow Imperial University, 
graduating with First Honors in 1916. He began his astro- 
nomical studies at Turkestan University in eastern Russu. 
He then served as astronomer and lecturer at the Tartu 
(Dorpat) Observatorv in Estonia from 1921 to 1944. earn- 
ing his doctorate in 1923 at the National UniversitJ ot 
Estonia. From 1930 until 1934. Dr. Opik was research 

(Continual on /></;•<• 23 I 

the Maryland Magazini 



Maryland Books and Authors 



Edited by Mrs. Harold Hayes, Head, Maryland and Rare Hooks Department 



Reviewed by Geoffrey Bruun 

NEW YORK 111 KM 1) TRIBUNE 

Aldridge, Alfred Owen. Man of 
Reason: The Life of Thomas 
PAINE. Philadelphia: J. B. Lip- 
pincott Company. 1959. 348 pp. 
$6. 

The only means of understanding 
Paine is through his ideas, Profes- 
sor Aldridge observed at the conclusion 
oi this detailed and objective study. The 
statement is true if by "understanding" 
Paine one means understanding his in- 
fluence on the American and French 
Revolutions, his controversy with Burke. 
and the religious views that exposed him 
to the unwarranted charge of atheism. 
But Paine, the "Man of Reason," had 
other qualities besides a logical mind: 
he had his full share of human frailties. 
He was a vain, self-taught dogmatist, 
uncleanly in his dress and habits, ad- 
dicted to drink, an incurable polemicist, 
and at times the casuist of his anti- 
pathies. 

The chief value of this latest biog- 
raphy lies in its clear and consistent 
analysis of Paine's thinking. As a popu- 
larizer of new ideas he has had few 
equals and time has vindicated most of 
the conclusions he reached on political 
fundamentals. His failures — as an en- 
gineer, a businessman, an aspiring diplo- 
mat, and a legislator (in the French 
National Convention) — stemmed partly 
from his personal limitations, partly 
from the accidents of fortune. His suc- 
cesses — "Common Sense," the "Crisis" 
articles, "The Rights of Man" and "The 
Age of Reason" — depended on his abil- 
ity to express the revolutionary princi- 
ples and the concept of natural rights 
that won such wide support in the later 
eighteenth century. 

How and where Paine imbibed these 
ideas is not important. They were in 
the air his generation breathed, winds 




Dr. Aldridge 



of doctrine fanned by "one great move- 
ment," as Robert R. Palmer has cur- 
rently demonstrated in the first volume 
of his "Age of Democratic Revolution." 
Paine's egotism led him to deny any 
indebtedness to other thinkers and Mr. 
Aldridge wastes no time trying to iden- 
tify which books or articles influenced 
him most. It was not the originality of 
his concepts that accounted for his 
strong influence but the independent, 
lucid and persuasive style in which he 
clarified and justified the new ideas. 

How Paine perfected his singularly 
effective style is therefore a matter of 
prime interest. His manuscripts contain 
remarkably few corrections, a fact that 
seems to bear out the testimony of sev- 
eral observers that (especially after some 
glasses of brandy) "he wrote with great 
rapidity, intelligence and precision; and 
his ideas appeared to flow faster than 
he could commit them to paper." Yet 
it is all but inconceivable that much 
of his best writing, musical, memor- 
able and imaginative, could have been 
composed and polished at such speed 
and in such circumstances. Mr. Al- 
dridge, who has weighed everything that 



survives with exceptional care, is con- 
vinced that "most of Paine's works were 
the product of solitary concentration." 

There is an obvious explanation In 
which these contrary conclusions ma\ 
be reconciled, but it is one that many 
people today, when learning by rote is 
out of fashion, find implausible. Paine's 
lazy interludes, his periods of "indo- 
lence and vacuity of thought" as one 
observer styled them, must have been 
hours of intense literary composition. 
He phrased, polished, and memorized 
whole paragraphs and even essays which 
he could then write out at high speed, 
when drink relaxed his critical hesita- 
tion sufficiently to release them. 

Support for such an explanation may 
be found in his ability to recite long 
passages of poetry. Joel Barlow was by 
no means the only acquaintance who 
commented on his "surprising mem- 
ory" — others who lacked Barlow's ad- 
miration for Paine mentioned his 
remarkable talent for verbal recapitu- 
lation. But the strongest evidence is 
that, even in later life, although he could 
recall little of others' writing, "he could 
recite all his own works by heart." 

A biography written with such in- 
sight, balance, and scholarly care as 
this one is a tribute to the subject and 
the author. The chapter notes at the 
close, which constitute at the same time 
a useful bibliography, are a proof 
of patient and diligent research. Mr. 
Aldridge, who is a Professor of English 
at the University of Maryland, has used 
the new letters and essays by Paine 
which have come to light in recent 
years, and has uncovered relevant docu- 
ments and papers in American and 
European archives that had remained 
unknown to Paine's earlier editors and 
biographers. 

REPRINTED FROM THE AUGUST 16. [959 

NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE 

BY PERMISSION 



May-June, I960 



19 




Do You Remember? 



THE ABOVE PICTURE IS ONE OF I. B. S\ MONS WITH HIS FIRS I C 1 ASS IN I N IOMOI - 
og\. The year was 1903 and the students from left to right were: Thornton 
Deaner; E. R. Sasscer. deceased: Rodger D. Nicolls. 14 Hutton Street. Ciaithersburg: 
Stuart B. Shaw. 4704 Calvert Road. College Park: J. G. Elisor, and E. Brown 
Sasscer. 

The Mckeldin Library is looking tor various kinds of materials on the Univer- 
sity and the State of Maryland. Already, it has received copies of a $500 Confed- 
erate bill, a hook on Oaths of Fidelity in Prince George's County, and a stock 
certificate tor the Silver Bell Mining Company. Garrett Count). 

Anyone having materials to add to the Library's collection should contact 
Howard Rovelstad, Director of Libraries. Mckeldin Library, University ot Mary- 
land, College Park, Md. or call WArfield 7-3800, \34l. 



20 



i ii i; Marvi and Magazine 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 




football coach tom Nugent addresses his spring crop of hopefuls. 



1 960 Football Outlook 



Coach tom nugent opened spring 
football practice March 29. His 
1960 varsity's first test was against var- 
sity alumni May 7 — the main attraction 
of this year's alumni spring reunion. 

Nugent has a small squad again this 
year. But he and his staff feel that the 
returning lettermen and a group of tal- 
ented freshmen can be molded into a 
representative team and one that can 
win. 

Nugent and his Terps surprised the 
experts last fall as the Terps broke even 
with a rugged schedule, winning their 
last three games, largely on the great 



performances of quarterback Dale 
Betty and end Gary Collins, an out- 
standing combination that returns this 
fall. 

The Terps' schedule calls for games 
with each conference school along with 
intersectional games with West Virginia, 
Texas, and Penn State. 

Nugent has 22 lettermen returning, 
10 juniors and 12 sophomores from the 
'59 team. He lost 10 lettermen, eight 
of them linemen along with fullback 
Jim Joyce, the Conference leading 
ground gainer and star of the Blue- 
Gray and Senior Bowl games. Among 



the eight linemen graduated are the 
star tackle to tackle fivesome, which is 
Nugent's top problem for this fall. Gone 
are veteran tackles Joe Gardi and Kurt 
Schwarz, guards Rodney Breedlove and 
Tom Gunderman, and center Vic 
Schwartz. They were considered the 
best interior line in the league last fall. 
This is a mammoth and most important 
job for the Terrapins. 

There are fine backs in quarterbacks 
Betty. Dick Novak, and Jim Davidson, 
a first team halfback last fall; and half- 
backs Everett Cloud, Dwayne Fletcher, 
(Continued on next page) 



May-June, 1960 



21 



I Mona, Don Van 

Oph loin 

appears to be tin. 

• outstanding hard 

Ken I louser and 

Johi i returning alter being out 

last fall. 

d position is anothei strong 
tion. in illina and Vinnie 

•! the rerps have two ol the host. 
ollins Maryland has one ol its im- 
csi all-around end and pass receivers ol 
.ill time He is .1 genuine all-America 
candidate Scott, too. is an exceptional 
all-around end and is one ol the nation's 
finest place kickers I he\ .ire backed 
up In .1 line pair m Henr\ Poniatowskj 
and Norman Kaufman. I hev will be 
aided bj a group ol ends considered the 
best to enroll in the same class: Harrv 
Butsko, Dick ( orbin, Ed Rog, Wall 
Rock, loin Rae, Mike Wing, and Andv 
I erifaj 

In Irving to soke the critical tackle 
to tackle problem, Nugent will use some 
veterans and mix in some of the new- 
comers that show so much promise. The 
two top returnees are junior tackle Bill 
Kirchiro and senior guard Pete Boinis. 
I bej should keep their starting assign- 
ments. Behind Kirchiro is letterman 
Dick Barlund and upcoming sophs 
( hester Detko, Norman Hatfield, and 
John Boinis. At the other tackle is 
letterman Lou Ingram with three new- 
comers working behind him: Roger 
Shoals. Gordon Bennett and Dick Jones. 
Behind Pete Boinis is junior Tom 
Sankovicb who lettered as a tackle last 
tall and two fine sophs in Tom Broumel 
and Cieorge Oatcha. The left guard spot 
is the one that has had all new faces 
Irving out this spring. Holding the inside 
track is upcoming soph Joe Hre/.o who 
is the finest prospect o\ all the freshmen 
linemen ot last fall. Behind him is 
another standout prospect. Bob Moore. 
With them are Garj Jankowski, a red- 
shirt last fall, and Tom laird, who 
didn't play last year because o\ illness. 
At center, there are two veteran let- 
termen m Leroy Dietrich and Bob 
Hacker and a trio ot freshmen. Dave 
( rossan, Bill Neveling and Ed Gilmore. 



Sept 

Sept 

Oct 

(Kl 

Oct. 

<>,! 

Oct 

Nov 

Nos i: 

Nov I'' 



17 

24 

I 

8 

15 
22 

s 



l^Mi Sera Di 1 1 

West Virginia at Morgantown 
I exas ai ( ollege Park 
Duke at ( ollege Park 
N< State at Raleigh iN) 
( lemson at ( ollege Park 
Wake Forest .a Winston Salem 
South ( arolina at College Park 
Penn Slate at Lnivcrsitv Park 

North Carolina ..t ( hapel Hill 
\ irginia at ( harlottesville 



Sports Summary 
1959-60 



Tin t m\ i asm ot m \kii wo on( i 
again dominated the winter sports 
picture in the Atlantic (oast Confer- 
ence. Of the four sports, basketball. 
swimming, wrestling, and indoor track. 
Maryland won three (onlerence titles: 
swimming, wrestling and indoor track. 
The basketball team had a successful 
season, winning fifteen and losing seven 
during the regular season schedule. 
I hey lost to North Carolina State in the 
opening round of the Atlantic (oast 
(onlerence Tournament. Their record 
in the Conference was nine wins and 
five losses which placed them third in 
the final Conference standings. The 
season was a success since it must he 
considered that Coach Millikan and his 
team received a severe setback with the 
loss of Charles McNeil and Bob Mc- 
Donald during the Christmas holidays. 
McNeil had been the leading scorer in 
his sophomore and junior years and a 
leading candidate for All-America hon- 
ors. Following the loss of these two 
boys Maryland was not considered to 
have a chance to have a good season, 
but the team jelled behind veterans Al 
Bunge and Jerry Bechtle and Sopho- 
mores Paul Jelus and Bruce Kelleher. 
Bunge won honorable mention All- 
America by the Associated Press. 
United International and Look Maga- 
zine. He was selected to the first team 
All-Conference on all selections and 
represented the University in the annual 
last-West All-Star dame in Madison 
Square Garden in March. 

Coach Bill Campbell's swimming 
team had a verv successful season. Their 
record was eleven wins and one loss. In 
the Conference thev were undefeated in 
seven league meets. Individual cham- 
pions in the Atlantic (oast Conference 
Meet held in the Maryland pool were 
Bob Kohl. Diving: and Ray Qstrander. 
Individual Medle) and 100 yard back- 
stroke, the 400 free stroke and 401) 



yard Medle) Relav. In the Atlantic 

( oast ( onlerence Meet. Maryland won 
six gold medals. The Championship was 
most significant for Coach Campbell 
and the swimming team inasmuch as 
this is only the fourth year that Mary- 
land had had a varsitv swimming team. 
Coach Sully Krouse's Wrestling 
Team once again dominated the Con- 
ference as thev were undefeated in 
five league matches to win the title lor 
the sixth consecutive year. Maryland 
continues to remain undefeated in ( on- 
lerence wrestling since the league was 
founded six years ago. In the Atlantic 
( oast Conference Championships held 
at the University of Virginia. Maryland 
won nine of the ten individual titles. 
The season was highlighted with the 
appearance of the great University ot 
Oklahoma team at Cole Activities 
Building in December. 

Coach Jim Kehoe's indoor track team 
once again had a brilliant record and 
some brilliant individual performances. 
The indoor track team won the Confer- 
ence title for the fifth year out of six. 
The Terps won the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference title with eight first place win- 
ners and a tie for first place and set 
three records in the meet. New records 
were set by Dick Estes in the high 
jump, and Bjorn Andersen in the pole 
vault and the two-mile relay team. In 
the only dual meet of the season. Marv- 
land beat their arch rival Navy 51 5 6 
to 48 1 6. Kehoe's team competed in 
the various Garden indoor meets 
throughout the East and represented 
the UniversitJ very well. In the 1( - \ 
Meet. Bill Johnson, the Terp outstand- 
ing hurdler, won the event and set a 
new record. Andersen tied for the pole 
vault title. In the VMI relav s. Maryland 
won handily. In this meet Johnson tied 
a national record for the high hurdles 
with the time ot 8.3 seconds. 

The outdoor track team is expected 
to have an outstanding season. 



"> ■> 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Opik Awarded Medal 
{Continued from page 18) 
ciate and lecturer at Harvard college 
and Observatory. Following World War 
II, he was professor of astronomj and 
Estonian rector at Baltic University, 
Hamburg, Germany. In l l >4,x. he was 
appointed research associate and astron 
omei ol the Armagh Observatory in 
Northern Ireland and has since become 
its director. 

Dr. Opik is a Fellow ol the Royal 
Astronomical Society, and a membei 
ol the Royal lush Academy, ami the 
American, the German, ami the lush 
Astronomical Societies. Before us dis 
solution m I'M i. Dr. Opik was a mem- 
ber of the Estonian Academy of 
Sciences. 



"Of interest from the Maryland point 
ol view is that I have a recreation centei 

in m\ area which includes an education 
center conducting courses ol instruction 
under the l fniversitj oi Maryland Ovei 
seas Educational Program." 

while Col. Schutz is in Korea, Mis 
SchutZ is residing in I ulhemlle. \l.n\ 
land, with then children at the home ol 

her parents. 

BURDE III in Pi ki 
Roger Burdette, '33, wrote a long 

Christmas letter from the interior ol 
Peru. As a member of a team from the 
United Nations, he is on a marketing 
project to several countries ol South 
America. Rotier invites the alumni to 



travel with him ii sou want to gel in 
land, imi bring a sleeping hag as there 
ma) not he anj hotels where you 

travel." He also claims the lish ,ue I 
large ami willing to he caught i I Ii 

address is I spinar 875 B, Mirafli 

I una. Peru. ) 

Vosloh Government] Econ< >misi 

(ail I. Vosloh, '50, is an Agricultural 
I conomisl in the Marketing I conomic: 

Research Division ol the Department ol 
Agriculture. His most recent article was 

entitled "Price Spreads for Formulated 
Poultry Feeds in Illinois." and appeared 
in the government publication Agricul- 
tural Marketing for December, l l ' Sl >. 
(Continued on next page) 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 




trooping the line of his men for the first 
time is Col. J. Logan Schutz, Agriculture 
'38, new commander of First Btl. Gp., 
Eighth Cavalry. He holds saber of com- 
mand received from Col. James E. Lan- 
drum. Jr., in a ceremony on Libhy Ridge 
in the First Cavalry Division area of Korea. 



Letter From Korea 

Colonel J. Logan Schutz, '38, recently 
assumed command of the 1st Battle 
Group, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Divi- 
sion, Korea. 

Col. Schutz writes: "My new com- 
mand is one of the finest in the United 
States Army. The 8th Cavalry is the 
foremost unit of the 1st Cavalry Divi- 
sion, which, in turn, is the only U. S. 
Division on-the-line in Korea. My troops 
are disposed along the Demilitarized 
Zone (DMZ). In fact, I can look into 
North Korea from my observation posts. 




They're prepared— 
how about you? 

They're learning to do the things that will make them well-rounded 
and useful citizens. In the meantime, they're depending on you . 
Now is the time to safeguard the future of your youngsters, and 
the rest of your family as well. We will be pleased to discuss with 
you and your attorney the many advantages of creating a First 
National Trust Fund either during your lifetime or by your will. 

FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK of Baltimore 

Main Office: Light & Redwood • Offices throughout Baltimore area • Member FDIC 



May-June, 1960 



23 






TOWSON PRACTICAL 
NURSING AGENCY 

di .1 \ l p. eased 

M \ I I KSII V ( IIKc.SK 

POB1 OP1 it v i iv t . lg] 

( ilMI' kNION 1*1 I 

ll(M \ < . i iERM IN 
DRexel 7-9138 BALTIMORE, MD. 



B. & B. 

EXTERMINATORS, INC. 

SANITATION and PEST 

CONTROL SERVICE 

TERMITE SPECIALISTS 

Phones: LExington 9-2140 — 9-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 




CHINESE-AMERICAN RESTURANT 
Chinese Food at Its Best 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Excellent Carry-out Service 

320 PARK AVE. MU 5-6790 

Baltimore, Md. 



Cloverland 
?arms 
T)airy 

* 

Quality 
Products 
Matched 

by 

Quality 
Service 



vmk Values 

I he values we hold help us shape our 
goals ami determine our behavior in 
attaining them, according to Jeanne S. 
\lnchn. Ol the ( ollege ol Agriculture 

We make choices according to our 
values Some choices are based on 
rather Standard values -like choosing 
Clothes that .ire durable and well made. 

We Understand material values easier 
than the psychological ones that societv 
has set tor us and we have set lor our- 
selves as individuals. I here are values 
which a societv holds lor the group 
while each individual in that society has 
Other values equally important to him. 

For instance, societv places a value 
on honestv while each individual places 
a different degree of value on this vir- 
tue. Even though hungry, one person 
may feel he must not take food that 
doesn*t belong to him. Another indi- 
vidual may think it permissible, if he 
fails to obtain it in the "society ap- 
proved" manner. 

An individual may strive hard to 
attain the goal of higher education be- 
cause he attaches a strong value to it. 

Children begin to learn at an early 
age certain values that parents directly 
or indirectly pass on to them. The set 
of values parents have are a result of 
those society approves and others 
they've learned to live by as individuals 
and part of a family group. 

Individuals may attach importance to 
other values like truthfulness and the 
value of good health. Today, a value 
in focus is that individuals are of equal 
worth. 




CLOVERLAND--THE DAIRY WITH COWS (Calves, too) 

► Visit Cloverland's Golden Guernsey Farm — Dulaney Valley A 
Road — 8 miles north of Towson. Milking starts at 4 P.M. ^ 



"There are many contributing fac- 
tors toward shaping one's set of values. 
1 ven for an individual, they change 
with age. opportunities, education and 

experience." concludes Mrs. Moehn. 



4-H WisM ks 



Maryland's delegates to National 4-H 
Conference in Washington -ire Carlton 
Ernst. Jr.. Washington County; Sarah 
King. Frederick County; Marlene Clark. 
Alleganj County; and Francis E. (jar- 
diner. Jr.. Anne Arundel County. Ernst 
is a junior in the College of Agriculture, 
and Miss King is a freshman in Home 
Economics 

I he conference, held at the National 
4-H Center. Washington, brings togeth- 
er representatives from each state and 
are selected because of their leadership 
activities on community, county, state 
and national levels. The program is 
planned to help young people gain a 
clearer perspective of the multiple in- 
fluences affecting their lives in these 
rapidly changing times 



BOUMA AND I.LNDQLIST AUTHORS 

John C. Bouma. '48. and Arnold L. 
Lundquist. '50. are authors of an article 
by the U. S. Department of Agriculture 
entitled "An Efficient Grocery Ware- 
house Layout." 

The authors graduated in Agricultural 
Economics and are marketing specialists 
in the Transportation and Facilities Re- 
search Division of the Agricultural 
Marketing Service. 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. H ui Sim ii i) ro Si k\ i 
POl H "i ( oMMI I IEE 

Dr. lrvin C. Haul. Director of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Experiment Sta 
tion, w.in selected as an alternate for 
the Committee on Organization and 
Policy for the northeasl region of the 
American Association of Land Grant 
Colleges and State Universities during 
recent meetings ol the Association. 



\l \ jor I w orj ii i>> Armi 1 \n 

Major Frank G. Favorite (Ph.D. '60, 
entomology ) has been assigned to the 
United States Army Environmental 

Health I aboratory. 

Major Favorite is a native of Wash- 
ington. D. C. He received his Bachelor 
of Science degree at American Univer- 
sity Washington. D. ('.. and his Master 
of Public Health degree at the Univer- 
sit\ of North Carolina. He entered the 
military service in 1940. Before his 
assignment to USAEHL he was sta- 
tioned at the Third U. S. Army Medical 
Laboratory in Atlanta, Georgia. 



Ditman Shoots Bull 

Dr. Lewis Ditman, Entomology Depart- 
ment, had the good fortune to shoot a 
bull moose while on a hunting trip in 
Canada. A few fortunate friends re- 
ceived morsels of mooseburger. Lewie 
invites all alumni to see his moose 
antlers and hear his experiences. 



National 4-H Award to Gottwals 

Abram Z. Gottwals, '38, has been named 
a national 4-H Alumni winner. This dis- 
tinction is made annually to eight 
persons from all parts of the United 
States. Gottwals is a bank executive 
from Upper Marlboro. Md., and has 
continued his interest in 4-H work by 
launching the first 4-H Federation cam- 
paign among Maryland bankers. 

The objective of the award is "to 
honor former 4-H members whose ac- 
complishments, following 4-H Club 
membership, exemplify effective com- 
munity leadership, public service to 4-H 
club work and success in their chosen 
careers." 

Congratulations to "Abe" from the 
University of Maryland Alumni Asso- 
ciation which he has also served with 
distinction. 



Borden Award to Dr. Speck 

Dr. Marvin L. Speck, '35, was awarded 
the 1959 Borden Award in Dairy Man- 

(Continued on next page) 

May-June, 1960 




CUSTOM BUILT ORTHOPAEDIC APPLIANCES 

(by prescription) 




ORTHOPAEDIC APPLIANCE CORPORATION 

220 W. 28th STREET Phone BEImont 5-9645 BALTIMORE 11, MD. 



Howard W. Jackson 



Carle A. Jackson 



H. Riall Jackson 



RIALL JACKSON COMPANY 

INSURANCE — ESTABLISHED 1904 

MUlberry 5-4700 — Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

It is important to know what your insurance policies do not cover. 

DRIVE CAREFULLY — AVOID ACCIDENTS 

Most Fires Result From Permitting Fire Hazards To Exist Or 
Other Forms Of Carelessness 



WILLIAMS 




CONSTRUCTION 




COMPANY 




INC. 




General Contractors 




Highways — Airports 




Phone MUrdock 


BALTIMORE, 


6-1000 


MD. 



OLSEN EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Engineered Equipment, Casters, Trucks, 
Conveyors and Fiberglas Products 

Portable Commercial Kitchen Equipment 

961 North Hill Rd. CH 3-6793 

Baltimore 18, Md. SA 7-8666 

Branch Office: Washington, D. C. Sterling 3-3480 



25 




CAREER 
OPPOR- 
TUNITIES 




WESTINGHOUSE-BALTIMORE 

has the challenging projects 
and advanced research on 
which engineering careers 
thrive . . . combined with the 
finest of facilities and an 
engineer-oriented manage- 
ment policy. Technological 
breakthroughs in Molec- 
tronics, 3-dimensional radar, 
Missile Guidance and other 
spaceageelectronic programs 
have created outstanding 
openings for creative en- 
gineers at Westinghouse- 
Baltimore. 



SEND YOUR RESUME TO 

Mr. A. M. Johnston, 
Dept. 258 



Westinghouse 

BALTIMORE 

P O Boi 748 Baltimore 3. Maryland 

AIR ARM . H.ECTHOWC* . OROWANCI 



ufacturing His fundamental research 
contribution! have been in the field ol 
nutrition ot bacteria, particularly the 
isolation and amino acid composition 
ni peptides stimulator) to the growth ol 
the lactic group ol streptococci. These 
studies have led to the development ol 
a starter culture stimulant lor improv- 
ing cottage cheese manufacture. 

I he Borden Awards are given each 
year to scientists ot the United States 
and ( anada in nine different fields. The 
award consists ot $1,000 and a gold 
medal to each u inner. 

Dr. Speck was horn in Middle town, 
Md., and received two degrees from the 
University ol Maryland and a Ph.D. 
from Cornell. He served as bacteriolo- 
gist tor Western Maryland Dairy, the 
United States Department ot Agricul- 
ture. University ol Maryland, National 
Dairy Research Laboratories and is now 
on the stall' of North Carolina State 
College 



Meeting At t mni 

A pleasure of traveling is suddenlv to 
meet an old friend, a former student or 
an alumnus. As I. Art Hamilton, en- 
tered the dining room at Michigan State 
University, East Lansing. Michigan. I 
was pleasantly surprised to meet Bill 
Taylor. "47. "Reds'" is married and has 
two daughters. They reside at Blanchard. 
Michigan. 



A. F. Vierhei t er Retires 

Alhert F. Vierheller has retired after 39 
years of duty, as Extension Horticultur- 
ist at the Universin of Maryland. 

Following military service in the First 
World War. Professor Vierheller estab- 
lished the horticultural study courses 
and field projects at the University for 
disabled ex-service men under a GI 
Bill. He later assumed extension field 
work with fruit growers throughout the 
State. 

As secretary o\ the Maryland State 
Horticultural Society he has been close- 
Iv associated with the formation of the 
Maryland Section oi Appalachian Apple 
Service, a four-state growers" organiza- 
tion for apple promotion. He also assist- 
ed in the setup of the Maryland State 
Apple Tax Commission to administer a 
grower tax for apple publicity. He 
helped inaugurate the Maryland Fruit 
Marketers Cooperative to enter collec- 
tive bargaining with fruit processors. 

He has been active in church, fra- 
ternal and civic affairs, and served on 
the College Park City Council. He is 
a native of Parkersburg. West Virginia, 
where he graduated from high school in 
1911. He and Mrs Vierheller will reside 
in College Park where several interests 
will occupy their time. 



( ) 



So Good in GLASS! 

Milk and other beverages 
YOUR family taste better — f 
and wholesome — when served in 



GLASS BOTTLES 

You can SEE the Quality and 
Quantity you are receiving. 



INSIST ON GLASS BOTTLES 

No Loss or Contamination of 
Flavor 



LEAKPROOF — SPARKLING 
TRANSPARENT 

I III BUCK GLASS 
COMPANY 

FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 
Baltimore 30. Md. 

Originators of the Squa 
Milk Bottle 





Look for the Sign 






MARIA'S 
300 






5( rving Baltimore's Fh ■ 

Italian Cuisine 

Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Monday 

300 Albermarle St. Mil 5-2811 

Baltimore 2. Md. MU 5-2812 


I 



26 



i h i: Maryi \ \ d Magazine 



( 'ollege of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



HlGH St HOOl Cii km \\ ( o\ 1 1 si 

Professor Cristophe Hering, Chairman 
of (Ik- Maryland Section of the Amer- 
ican Association of reachers ot Ger- 
man, was state supervisor for their Na- 
tional Contest for high school students 
ol German. Forty-eight Maryland stu- 
dents took the test this past March. 



German-Ami Rk w Cui ruRAJ 
History 

At the annual meeting of the Society 

lor the History of the Germans in 
Maryland, Assistant Dean Augustus J. 
Prahl. Professor in the Department of 
Foreign Languages, spoke on "Alexan- 
der von Humboldt" to honor the cen- 
tenary of the death of the noted German 
scientist, explorer and natural philoso- 
pher. His talk, delivered on February 
26th. emphasized von Humboldt's con- 
nections with the United States. 



Student's Sculpture Exhibited 

A life-size head in granite, entitled 
"Cossack." was among the entries se- 
lected by the jury for the 1960 Mary- 
land Artists Exhibition at the Baltimore 
Museum of Art. The work was sculp- 
tured by Wasyl Palijczuk, a junior at 
the University. 

Palijczuk, a graduate of Baltimore 
City College, is an art major and in- 
tends to follow a teaching career in art. 

The stone used in this work was a 
discarded piece of granite lying near 
his dormitory. Wasyl said he had no- 
ticed it for some time and became 
intrigued with the potential sculptural 
possibilities suggested by the odd shape 
of the granite. 



General Research Board Grants 

Professor Alfred Bingham has just been 
awarded a grant from the Graduate 
School's General Research Board to 
complete an article on the Recueil phi- 
losophique et litteraire and the Encyclo- 
pedic His research was initiated at the 
Bibliotheque Nationale. 

Professor Marguerite Rand has also 
been awarded a graduate grant for fur- 
ther research on Azorin. He is consid- 
ered the dean of Spanish letters today. 
Mrs. Rand went to Madrid to interview 
him in connection with the book on him 
she published in 1956. 

{Continued on next page) 



Be Really 
itefreshed! 

Have A 

Cote 




Coca Cola Bottling Co. o£ Silver Spring 



FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT CO., Inc. 

— Since 1931 — 

Designers & Manufacturers of 

COMPLETE RESTAURANT, COMMERCIAL 

and INSTITUTIONAL KITCHENS 

Fabricators of Stainless Steel 
Service and Repair 

4908 Lawrence St. Hyattsville, Md. 

APpleton 7-3765 



Ottenbergs Bakers 

Inc. 

Quality Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 
INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



~ 



Jfullcr $c b'^lbcrt 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 



Since 



1920 



Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



May-June, 1960 



27 



HAVE YOU 
SEEN THE NEW 
SITE FOR SAVERS? 




Generous Quarterly 

Dividends Will Be 

Paid in 1959 

District 7-2370 

Th E FlRSTpEDERAL 
I X WvSHI \GTO\ 

FIRST H 111 H \l S W INCS \M> In W 
ASSOCIATION! 01 WASHINGTON 

610 — 13th Street, N.W. 

Bethesda Branch 
8216 Wisconsin Avenue 



r~ 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Druggist 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



L_ 



MUlberry 5-2823 Established 1876 

Dmitri i j&ook J^toxs 

MEMBER ABAA 

; OLD, RARE AND OUT-OF-PRINT BOOKS 

MARYLAND BOOKS - SCHOLARLY BOOKS 

805 N. HOWARD ST. 

Baltimore 1, Md. 

ALLEN W. SCHULTZ 



1)1 PARI MINI ill Akl Nl US 

A one-man show ol paintings by Don- 
.ild Montano, a 1956 graduate in Fine 
Arts, wraj held lasi I ebruarv in the 
Student L nion Mr Montano KTVed as 
a |et pilot in Japan and Korea, and the 
paintings were the result ol his experi- 
ences there. He plans to continue his 
art studv in graduate school this tall. 
Six ol the fourteen paintings were 
stolen by thieves who broke into the 
locked exhibition area. I he paintings 
have not been recovered. 

Gouaches, drawings and oils bv 
Associate Professor Herman Maril were 
featured in a one-man show held at 
the Bader Gallery, Washington, D I 
during February . 

Mr. Mitchell Jamieson of the De- 
partment of Fine Arts spoke on "As- 
pects ol Painting: Qualities ol Painting 
Today and In the Past" at the third 
coffee hour sponsored by the AWS 
Cultural Committee, on March 23. 



New Fa< un Mi mber 

Dr. Gilbert Gordon will join the fac- 
ulty in September as Assistant Profes- 
sor of Chemistry. Dr. Gordon has been 
at Michigan State University, where he 
has completed his graduate work. 

Iinih [nter-American Conference 
on the Caribbean 

The L'niversitv oi Maryland was repre- 
sented by Mr. Richard F. Allen at the 
recent Tenth Annual Conference on The 
Caribbean held at the University of 
Florida. Gainesville. The conference 
was organized by the School of Inter- 
American Studies. University of Flor- 
ida, in cooperation with the Interna- 
tional Petroleum Company. Ltd. The 
theme of the meeting was Education in 
the Caribbean. Mr. Allen's contribution 
to a round table discussion dealt with 
the significance of St. Augustine in the 
historv oi Spanish Florida. 



Dr. BiiAikiN Awarded 
Fl i bright Grant 

Dr. Eleanor Bulatkin, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Foreign Languages, has been 
awarded a Fulbright grant for lecturing 
and research abroad included in the 
Fulbright program for the academic 
year 1960-61. 

Dr. Bulatkin obtained an M.A. de- 
gree in 1951, and a Ph.D. degree in 
1952 in Romance philology from Johns 
Hopkins University . 

She has been a member oi the Uni- 
versity o\ Maryland faculty since 144S. 
except for the summer oi 14-W when 
she taught at Johns Hopkins. 



HARVEY DAIRY 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 

SERVING PRINCE GEORGES 
ond MONTGOMERY COUNTIES 

Your Neighbors 
Buy Our Milk 



Vitamin Homogenized Milk 
Grade A Pasteurized Milk 
Eitra Rich Homogenized 
Vitamin D Milk 

Cultured Buttermilk 
Pat Pree Milk 
Chocolate Milk 
Butter-Sweet Cream 
Cottage Cheese 
Eggs — Strictly Fresh 
Half and Half 
Sour Cream 
Table Cream 
Whipping Cream 
Margarine 
Fresh Orange Juice 



APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 






See and Drive the 1960 Ford 



SALCS 



5&Ft£ 



SERVICE 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

31 10 Hamilton Street 
HYATTSVILLE MD. 

Phone AP 7-0110 



Thompson Furniture Co. 

Y uniit urt of Quality 

.it Reasonable Prices 

MODERN & PERIOD 

SIMMONS. KROEHLER, THOMASVILLE, 

BASSETT, GEM CRIB & CRADLE, LANE 

1810 Rhode Island Ave.. X.E. 
Washington, D.C. LA 6-1622 



28 



i ii 1 Maryland M \c. \zi ne 



Musk i>i pah i mi m Summi r 

\\ 0RKSHOP9 

I his summer the Musn.- Department will 
present its (hud annual workshop in 
Band and Chorus, [he workshops will 
hri iiii together students from all over 
the state for a week of intensive work 
under two outstanding directors in the 

held ol hand and ehoral music. 

I he Band Workshop will once again 
be under the direction of Mr. James 
Neilson. of Oklahoma City University, 
who was so successful as the director 
ol last year's group. Dr. Elaine Brown, 
founder of Philadelphia's "Singing City"' 
and one of today's great choral conduc- 
tors, will be director of the Choral 
Workshop. 

A new feature of the l l )6() series of 
Workshops will be a String Ensemble, 
conducted by Mr. Joel Berman, Assist- 
ant Professor of Music at the Univer- 
sity. 

The workshop will culminate in a 
joint concert of all participating groups 
to be held on July 15th, at which time 
the groups will perform the music pre- 
pared during the previous week. 



Microbiology Notes 

The third lecture in the 1959-60 series 
on "Theoretical and Applied Aspects 
of Modern Microbiology" was presented 
March 9, 1960 by Dr. Ned B. Williams, 
Professor of Microbiology at the School 
of Dentistry, University of Pennsyl- 
vania. The talk was entitled "Microbial 
Ecology of the Oral Cavity." It is felt 
that the first year for this new series of 
lectures has been a very successful one. 
The three events were well attended 
by university personnel and by guests 
from N.I.H., Walter Reed, U.S.D.A., 
Fort Detrick, and neighboring universi- 
ties. Approximately 500 copies of each 
lecture are being mailed to individuals 
and departments throughout the United 
States. 

Dr. Raymond N. Doetsch, Associate 
Professor of Microbiology, has been ap- 
pointed to the editorial board of Applied 
Microbiology, an official publication of 
the Society of American Bacteriologists. 

Several members of the Department 
of Microbiology spoke at the 60th Gen- 
eral Meeting of the Society of American 
Bacteriologists held in Philadelphia May 
2-6. Included on the program were Mr. 
E. C. S. Chan, Mr. Noel R. Krieg, Mr. 
Charles E. Buckler, Mr. Gerald L. 
Gilardi, Professor Michael J. Pelczar, 
Jr., Professor P. Arne Hansen, and 
Professor Raymond N. Doetsch. Re- 
ports of various departmental research 
projects constituted the subject of the 
talks. Professor Pelczar also served as 
convener for one of the general sessions 
during the course of this convention. 

(Continued on next page) 



A Salute to the Class of 1960 

Dietrich Brothers looks forword each year to extending congratulations to another 
University graduating class. For us it has become a pleasant tradition. 




DIETRICH BROTHERS, INC. 

BALTIMORE 18, MARYLAND 
HOpkins 7-9700 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

INSURANCE BUILDING 
TEmple 2-5623 



• The Student Activities Building is 
part of another University tradition 
campus buildings containing 
steel fabricated by Dietrich Brothers 



DIETRICH 
BROTHERS 



Steel Warehousing 
Steel Fabricating 




OLES 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 

Jjaltimore $ 1 ioneer (envelope ^Manufacturer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory : 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. ADams 4-3979 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 



direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 



Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 



53rd ANNIVERSARY — Organized 1906 







PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. ELgin 5-9300 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS. Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located In the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE. MD. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



May-June, 1960 



29 



JAMES POSEY 

and 
ASSOCIATES 

Consulting 

Engineer 

10 E. Pleasant St. 
Baltimore, Md. 




1 «nHfiifll rg H : Wa 



HIGH DIVIDENDS plus 
INSURED SAFETY 

Vermont 
Federal 
Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Fayette at Hanover Streets 

Baltimore 3, Maryland 

All accounts insured up to $10,000 00 
by an agency of the United States Gov't 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 

and ACCESSORIES 

Lei our well-trained staff aiiitt you 

in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 S CHARLES ST MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

tag this area fine* I 



Attend Mi i hng 

Di I His K. Lippincott, Dr. William C. 
Purdy and Dr. Derek Steele ol the De- 
partment ol ( hemistr) attended the 
Pittsburgh ( onference on Analytical 
( hemistr) and Applied Spectroscopy 
February 29-March 4. 



A Spanish Poi r's Wn i 

l Ik- late Zenobia Jimenez, like her hus- 
band, the Nobel Prize winning poet 
Jimene/. taught Spanish at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. A writer herself, she 
played a unique role in her husband's 
life and work. Professor Graciela 
Nemes' lecture "Zenobia on the Life 
and Works o\ Juan Ramon Jimenez*' 
was delivered on February 21st at 
George Washington University tor the 
American Association of Teachers ol 
Spanish and Portuguese. The lecture, 
accompanied by Mrs. Nemes' bibliogra- 
phy on Mrs. Jimene/. is scheduled for 
July publication in the Inter-American 
Review of Bibliography. As a sequel to 
the biography of the husband. Mrs. 
Nemes is preparing a study of the wife 
from unpublished sources in Puerto 
Rico and personal acquaintance. 



Chinese Cultural Center 

The University Library has been re- 
cently presented by the Government of 
the Republic of China a complete set 
of the Histories of Twenty-Five Dynas- 
ties (Erh-Shih-Wu Shin) and 6 volumes 
of Three Hundred Master Paintings Re- 
productions, as a token of appreciation 
of the University's effort in promoting 
cultural relations between China and 
America. This set of 934 volumes is the 
only standard history of China, covering 
a period of more than 3,000 years, be- 
ginning with remote years of antiquity 
before Christ to the year of 1643 A.D. 
The volumes of Chinese paintings are 
exquisitely reproduced from the palace 
collections, covering the period of 650- 
1715 A.D. The donation was made pos- 
sible through the suggestion of Mr. C. C. 
Chen of the Foreign Language Depart- 
ment to the Chinese Ministry of Edu- 
cation. Mr. (hen was the first Chinese 
alumnus of the University and joined 
the faculty in 1954 to teach Chinese 
language and Chinese civilization cours- 
es. He has also been promoting an 
annual conference on Chinese-American 
Cultural Relations on campus, and this 
year the sixth Conference was scheduled 
on May 13. Recently, Mr. Chen has 
assisted the editorial committee of the 
American Historical Association on the 
new edition ol a Guide to Historical 
literature by compiling Chinese and 
Japanese materials. 




X J10T0 did ravin ft 

Tor JL roarams 

— -^jilaloa 
a J\ jtinazi 



oas 



an 



\zincs 



n« 



ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



The Asphalt Service Co. 

Inc. 

1836 Chesapeake Ave. 
Elgin 5-1560-61 

BALTIMORE 26, MD. 






Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

ROOM 1100 
501 St. Paul St. 
Baltimore 1. Md. 
LExington 9-0070 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



30 



i 1 1 1- Maryland Magazine 



Sociology oi Jewish Students 

Rabbi Meyer Greenberg, Director of 
the University's B'nai Brith-Hillel Foun- 
dation and teacher oi Hebrew in the 
Department ol Foreign I anguages, is 
the author of "Social Characteristics 
of the Jew i>h Students at the Univer- 
sity of Mars land" in Jewish Social 
Studies, April. I960. The stiul> is based 
on his doctoral dissertation for the De- 
partment of Sociology. 



Pioniik Sociot oc;v Work 
Distributed ro Communis! Libraries 

(her 100 copies of The Sociology of 
American Life by Dr. Harold Hoffsom- 
nier. Chairman of the Department of 
Sociology, have been received by jour- 
nalists, universities, and libraries in such 
countries behind the Iron Curtain as 
Rumania. Czechoslovakia, Poland. Hun- 
gary, and Bulgaria. 

The work was one of the earliest 
books to be selected for such foreign 
distribution by the International Advis- 
ory Council, Inc.. working with the 
Free Europe Committee to provide 
satellite countries with literary and edu- 
cational materials. Used campus-wide 
and overseas for the university's Amer- 
ican Civilization Program, the new text 
(Prentice Hall, 1958, 628 pp.) holds a 
unique position as an authoritative 
exposition of American society. Dr. 
Hoffsommer has published some 45 
other titles, was the national President 
of the Rural Sociological Society in 
1959. 

A number of letters from university 
officials, particularly in Poland and 
Hungary, expressed warm thanks for 
the book. 

From Bratislavia, Poland, came the 
message: "Please accept our warmest 
expression of gratitude for your gen- 
erosity in making it possible for us to 
have your publication. The volume has 
been passed on to our scientists who 
specialize in the field of sociology and 
if a commentary be published in one 
of our reviews we certainly not hesitate 
to let you know it. The book, as a 
whole, seems to be indispensable for any 
scholar interested in the sociology of 
America." 

Not all of the copies were so enthu- 
siastically received. One was swiftly sent 
back from the Karl Marx Institute in 
Budapest, Hungary, marked "Retour!" 
However, some professors have already 
sent scientific publications in exchange. 

The Free Europe Committee has se- 
lected works from university presses of 
Harvard, Princeton, Stanford and Yale, 
a book by Mrs. F. D. Roosevelt, and 
publications of the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, 
among others. 

(Continued on next page) 



Moving with 
by Land [ 



Care, 

by Sea 



Everywhere 
by Air 



DflVIDSOIX 

TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. 



• Pre-Planned Moving to take many details off your hands 

• Nation-Wide and World-Wide Service thru United Van Lines 

• Sanitized Vans, protected against germs, insects, odors 

• Saf-T-Pak, cleanest, safest method for fragile goods 

• Palletized Storage, each lot in clean, mobile containers 
BALTIMORE • BRoadway 6-7900 WASHINGTON • LAwrence 9-2700 



immmm, 




WASHINGTON 




U. OF 
MARYLAND 



SILVER 
SPRING 



BETHESDA 



viom; HOUSE 
I INN 



. . . visit the Maryland Room 

where smart people gather 

for dining at it3 hist 

FOUR CORNERS HIWAY 29 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JUniper 8-9700 



DEEP SOUTH BAR-B-Q 

7553 New Hampshire Ave. 

LANGLEY PARK, Washington, D. C. 

HEmlock 4-1818 



^batter's; 

CONVALESCENT RETREAT 

Situated on a knoll in the center of a 10-acre lawn, 
beautiful shade trees and landscape grounds 

ELLICOTT CITY, MARYLAND 

25 minutes to downtown Baltimore — 30 miles to Washington 
Phone Ellicott City 206 



ELIZABETH COONEY 

PERSONNEL AGENCY 

Town & Country Service 

Practical Nurses, Maternity and Convalescent Care 
Baby Sitters & Companions, Day and Evening Appointments 
Supervisors, Week-ends and Vacations 
1511 PENTRIDGE ROAD HO 7-8435 
BALTIMORE, MD, TU 9-4772 




May-June, 1 960 



31 



» 


• **•*•••• 


* 


THE GIFT 


* 


THAT 


* 


GROWS 


• 


For the 


* 


GRADUATE 




and 


• 


for YOU 


* 


\n 1 -1 U LN8I RED 4 


• 


I [MBS \ ^ BAB DIVIDEND- 


• 


- \\ [NGS \« ( «»l M' at 


• 


FRATERNITY 




FEDl RAL 


• 


Savings Ami Loan A 


• 


764-770 Washington Blvd. 


Baltimore 3, Maryland 


• 




• 


•to $10,000 In Gov'1 Agency 




HIGHER I'll Q\ All 1 1 RLY 


• 


BY MAIL 




THREE DRIVE UP WINDOWS 


• 


V I'AHK . 




Dependability and Service 

MORRISON & FIFER 

— Disjx iixiiiy ('hi mista — 

Paul Abchambault, Prop. 

3109 ST. PAUL ST. BE 5-3579 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Career in Business 

Day & Evening Classes 
Complete Courses 

Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

Stenographic, Junior Accounting. 

Write or Phone for Catalogue 

STRAYER COLLEGE 
18 N. Charles St. LE 9-5626 



?" 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL ond MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 



nun 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Dk Frederick Honored b\ Alumni 

A group ol Maryland alumni recentl) 
gathered for a luncheon in honor of 
Dr. John H. Frederick, Professor of 

Transportation and Head of the De- 
partment of Business Organization. 
Work in transportation as a major field 
in the College of Business and Public 
Administration began when Dr. Fred- 
erick joined the faculty in 1946. 

The chairman of the group was 
Frank Smith of the Transportation 
Association of America. It is thought 
the group may enlarge by the addition 
of 10 or more others in the Washington 
area and become a permanent organ- 
ization of transportation alumni. Thirty- 
eight attended the luncheon. 

Shull Outstanding Agent 

Frank T. Shull. 58. who led the Wash- 
ington agency of the New England Life 
Insurance Company in both volume and 
lives for the year 1959. was presented 
the Most Valuable Associate Award 
recently. Mr. Shull is the youngest man 
in the history of the agenc\ to win this 
honor. 

Ireland Elected 

Alfred W. Ireland. Jr.. '37, has been 
elected President of the Association for 
Corporate Growth and Diversification. 
The organization serves as a forum for 
exchange of information among lead- 
ing corporations on new products de- 
velopment, innovations, corporate di- 
versification and corporate acquisition. 

Bureau Studies Published 

The Bureau of Business and Economic 
Research has recently published studies 
concerning two wideh separated geo- 
graphic areas. 

A stud) ol the European economic 
community, in two parts, was released 
late last year. 

A stud) o\ non-agricultural employ- 
ment in Maryland for the period 1939- 
1958 was published earl) in April. In 
addition to changes in total employment 
from year to year tor the whole period. 





CARLEA 




The House of 






BRAND NAME 






Sanitation Chemicals 






AND 






Janitor Supplies 






SLMON1Z 






— Cleaners ond Waxes 






BR1LLO 






— Sleel Wool Floor and 






Hand Pads 






BLACK & DECKER 






— Commercial 






Vocuums 






GENERAL 






— Electric — Floor 






Scrubbing & Polishing Machines 




CARLEA JANITOR SUPPLY CO. 






516 W. Franklin St. 






MU 5-5608 Baltimore 1, Md. MU 5-5269 





KNOW 
HOW 




WANT 



THE MAURICE LEESER CO. 



VICTOR P. SKRUCK, 



Creative Printers and Lithographers 



536 W. MATT ST. 



BAIT1MOM 1, MD. 



SARATOGA 7-444* 



King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



fJ^arci-sHvon ^cliool 

itarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 

805 X. Charles St. YE. 7-1155 

Baltimore, Md. 



32 



i ii i Maryland Magazini 



fluctuations in the proportion ol United 
States employment attributable to Marj 
land are recorded as well. For the more 
recent ten year period ending ill 1958, 

inatheniatie.il trends ami patterns ol 

seasonal variation have been calculated. 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S. 



Alumni Breakfast in Washington 

The annual alumni breakfast held Tues- 
day. March 15, during the District of 
Columbia post-graduate meeting at the 
Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D. G, 
was quite successful. Approximately 80 
attended. 

President Harry W. F. Dressel wel- 
comed the members and guests and 
spoke about plans for the coming June 
Week, also the Endowment Fund pro- 
gram. Dean Myron Aisenberg thanked 
the Alumni Association for their gift 
of $2,500 toward purchasing television 
facilities for the Dental School. He in- 
formed us that the School is now en- 
gaging in important research activities 
and invited the alumni to visit and in- 
spect the expanded facilities. He ex- 
pressed appreciation of the ample cov- 
erage which the Alumni Association, 
through its "Alma Mater," gave to 
faculty news and to student matters. 
He announced that a "Katharine 
Toomey Award" will be given annually 
beginning June, 1960. Lewis C. Toomey, 
'42. and his wife Jane Boswell Toomey 
will sponsor the award. 

Dr. Samuel A. Leishear, President 
of the District of Columbia Dental So- 
ciety, was our guest and responded to 
recognition as did Dr. Israel Schulman, 
his General Arrangements Chairman. 

Again we thank Ben Williamowsky, 
'48, Chairman, and Ashur Chavoor, '48, 
Co-Chairman, for arranging this excel- 
lent breakfast in the beautiful Palladian 
Room. 



Alumni and Guests Attending 
Washington Breakfast 



Class 
1907 



1910 



1915 



R. H. Mills, Washington, D. C. 

Richard F. Simmons, Norfolk, 
Virginia 

S. Vernon Strickler, Charlottes- 
ville, Virginia 

T. D. Webb, Washington, D. C. 

James H. Ferguson, Jr., Balti- 
more, Maryland 

(Continued on next page) 



CONGRATULATIONS-— 

(?ICU4, o£ 60 

To you, the new alumni of the University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry, we extend our very best wishes for 
a successful career in the practice of your chosen pro- 
fession. 

We cordially invite you to come in and inspect the 
facilities of one of America's largest laboratories. 




o-operaffive 

Dental Laboratories 

Arllttnt ol D.nl.i Proithtltcs 
12 W.il Mod, ion StrMt 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



SERVING THE DENTAL PROFESSION 
WITH DISTINCTION SINCE 1910 



I 



*7Ue tJlauAe. 9*t ^lUe Pinal 

Nursing and Convalescent Home 

AFFORDING REST & CARE TO THE AGED, INFIRM, PARALYTICS, 
CONVALESCENTS AND THE CHRONICALLY ILL. 

DESIGNED FOR THOSE WHO SEEK CARE AND THE PERSONAL ATTENTION OF 
AN INTELLIGENT NURSING SERVICE IN A QUIET HOME-LIKE ATMOSPHERE 



Nellie Clough Dorsey, R.N. 
Nursing Supervisor 



16 FUSTING AVENUE 
Catonsville, Md. 



Rldgeway 
7-1800 







THE 


BALTIMORE ENVELOPE 


CO. 












MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 














1020 WEST PRATT STREET 










Phone 


MUlbcrry 


5-6070 




Bolt 


more 


23. 


Md. 



ACME 
TILE COMPANY 

Terrazzo 
Tile — Marble — Slate 

A. F. Pizza 

PL 2-3554 908 Trinity St. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



New! Audio Tape 

RECORDED TAPES 

"Hi-Spirits" or 
"Blood and Thunder" 

Each Bonus Package includes 1-7 inch 
1200 ft. Reel tape and 1-7 inch recorded 
reel of Sparkling Classics. 

Either Package at the low intro- 
ductory price of $5.20 each. 

Specify dual or four track. 

WHOLESALE RADIO PARTS CO., Inc. 

311 W. Baltimore St. 
Baltimore 1, Md. 
Tel. MU 5-2134 



May-June, 1960 



33 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Sale* Representative* in 
Principal Eastern C\ 



D. C. Ignition ^ 
Headquarters 

Inc. 

• Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and motor trouble! 

• Tune up . . . 

• Specialty repairs . . . 

• United Motors . . . 

• Bowers Batteries — Mallory 
Ignition . . . 

authorized service: carburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 

Phone: FEderal 7-7038 

1230 20th St., N.W. 

V^ Washington, D. C. J 

MARYLAND CHIEF 

TOMATOES 




Packed 
By 

J. LANGRALL & BRO. INC. 

CANNERS SINCE 1878 



HIOWELl & HIDWELL, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 

WEbster 5-4500 MD. 



( onrad I Inman, Baltimore, 
Maryland 

i i >I7 ( K..\ Sturm, Fairmont, Vir- 
ginia 

1918 Edwin G. Gail, Baltimore, 

M.tis land 

Dan O. \ i.i ( harlottesville, Vir- 
ginia 
1422 Myron S. Aisenberg. Baltimore. 
Mars land 

Daniel E. Shehan, Baltimore. 
Mars land 

1923 Harrj A. SUberman, Ridgefield, 

New Jersey 

1924 James B. Bradley, Washington, 

I) C. 

James \V McCaii, (<reenbelt. 
Mar) land 

1925 I . M. Colvin, Washington. D. C. 
B. A. Dickson, Marion. North 

Carolina 
Daniel F. Lynch, Washington. 

D. C. 
R. E. Williams, Goldsboro. 

North Carolina 

1926 Roy H. Bridger, Silver Spring. 

Maryland 
Allan L Watts. Shippensburg. 

Pennsylvania 
1^27 J. G. Fitzgerald. Washington, 

D. C. 
F. J. Hess. Washington. D. C. 
Paul Hoffman. Washington. 

D. C. 
Frank Hurst. Washington. D. C. 

1928 W. C. Bashore, Bethesda. Mary- 

land 

Benjamin A. Brown. Ventnor 
City. New Jersey 

Melvin Hazen Colvin. Wash- 
ington. D. C. 

Wilbur B. Mehring. Silver 
Spring. Maryland 

A. Ham Ostrow. Washington. 
D. C. 

1929 George B. Clendenin. Bethesda. 

Maryland 
Kyrle W. Preis. Baltimore. 
Maryland 

1931 Douglas A. Edwards. Red Bank. 

New Jersey 

1932 C. E. Broadrup. Frederick. 

Maryland 
1935 Hansel H. Snider. Moorefield, 
West Virginia 

1937 F. Melvin Edwards. Red Bank. 

New Jerse) 
John Conrad Heck. Baltimore. 
Maryland 

1938 Julian W. Habercam. Baltimore. 

Maryland 
Ernest V. Williams. Washington. 
D. C. 

1939 H. J. Hoffaeker. Hanover, Penn- 

s\ Ivania 

1941 S. P. Beaven, Baltimore. Mars- 

land 

1942 1 ess is C. loonies. Silver Spring. 

Mars land 

1943 Frank J. Brsce. Silver Spring. 

Maryland 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

ITS THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 
3°o Interest on Savings 

• 

Administration Building 

6495 New Hampshire Ave., 
Hyattsville, Md. 

HYATTSVILLE — SILVER SPRING 

JUniper 8-5000 Member F.D.I.C 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVerqrecn 4-3041 

15710 Colesville Road 
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



Bon Ton 
POTATO CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON FOOD PRODUCTS 

801 Fronklin St., N.E. 
HU 3-4232 Washington 




RESTORFF MOTORS 

A/Odjl Servic 



Sales 



7323 BALTIMORE BLVD • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK. MD 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



34 



run Maryland Magazine 



1950 

195] 

1952 



Fred V. Beerbower, Kingwood, 

West Virginia 
Henrj s. Hohouser, Suitland, 

Mar\ land 
l l >44 Walter Broun. Fairmont, West 

Virginia 
I loyd E. Church, Bethesda, 

\\.\i\ land 
C. R. Gerber, Jr.. St. Mary's, 

West Virginia 
1945 Harry \Y. F. Dressel, Baltimore. 

Maryland 
[946 Joseph P. Cappuccio, Baltimore. 

Maryland 
1947 S. W. Johnston. I'ort Lauder- 
dale, Florida 
1 l) 4S Ashur Ci. Chavoor, Washington, 

D. C. 
William Dodson, Arlington. Vir- 
ginia 
Paul H. Loflin, Beckley, West 

Virginia 
Jose E. Medina, Baltimore, 

Maryland 
Edwin R. Rapp, Silver Spring. 

Maryland 
Ben A. Williamowsky, Silver 

Spring, Maryland 

A. Clyde Hannah, Salisbury, 
Maryland 

Robert H. Jernick, Nutley, New 
Jersey 

Jack D. Robertson, Washington, 
D. C. 

Robert M. Brackbill, Landis- 
ville, Pennsylvania 

M. E. Hinds, Baltimore, Mary- 
land 

Albert C. Reed, Baltimore, 
Maryland 

Thomas Salimeno, Jr., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

1954 Kenneth H. Stoll, Arlington, 

Virginia 

1955 J. T. McCarl, Greenbelt, Mary- 

land 
William F. Martin, Jr., Balti- 
more, Maryland 

1956 Clayton S. McCarl, Greenbelt, 

Maryland 

J. Philip Norris, Baltimore, 
Maryland 

Raymond W. Palmer, Jr., Balti- 
more, Maryland 
1958 Benedict S. LiPira, Baltimore, 
Maryland 

William H. Neilund, Silver 
Spring, Maryland 

Ronald M. Starr, Bethesda, 
Maryland 



Dean Aisenberg, Dr. Cappuccio, Dr. 
Devlin Cited as Distinguished 

Alumni 

The Rhode Island and New Jersey sec- 
tions of the Alumni Association of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 

(Continued on next page) 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Specialists in Residential and 
Commercial Air Conditioning 

Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

CALL US FOR THE NAME OF YOUR 
NEAREST DEALER 

YORK WHOLESALERS, Inc. 

(Wholesale Distributor) 

501 - 15th ST. # SOUTH 
OTis 4-3700 Arlington, Va. 



'eajtf&d 




DIP N DRESSING 

JJjfelightful Flavors 

FRENCH ONION 

tCON & HORSERADISH 

BLUE CHEESE 



WONDERFUL AS A DIP OR SALAD DRESSING 



THE SOUTHERN PLATE CLASS (0. 



^//aii and <d\J\E.hal CJonixaciou 



2519 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE |A CAVETTC Q 70AA 
BALTIMORE 17. MARYLAND LAFAYETTE O m l L\J\3 



James Speros 

Jyormanay Jarm 

Potomac, Maryland OL 2-9421 




Open daily 12 to 12 midnight 

— Air conditioned — 

Member Diner's Club and Universal 

Travel Card 




Remember The 

Graduate with Flowers 

We Deliver 

LeROY RUBOTTOM 

Owner-Designer 
6921 Laurel Ave. Takoma Park, Md. 



May-June, 1960 



35 



SIGNS 

Of all Metals and Plastics 

BRONZE TABLETS 



Name Plates 



Bulletin Boards 



LAMB SEAL 

& 

STENCIL CO.. INC. 

824-826 Thirteenth St., N.W. 
(just below eye) 

Washington 5, D. C. 

NA. 8-8720-8-8604 

Since 1900 




KwxmlViemeo 



RETAIL & WHOLESALE 



1400 PRINCE ST. 

ALEXANDRIA, 
VA. 

TE 6-3260 



DUCKWORTH 
ROOFING 

CO., Inc. 

• 

SLAG ROOFING 

Repairing — Painting 

METAL WORK 



NOrth 7-0336 

2253 SHERMAN AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Dental School, l niversitji of Maryland. 
have recently bestowed awards upon 

outstanding denial alumni. 

On March 12. 1^60, Dean Myron 
s Usenberg received the Distinguished 

Alumnus Award trom the Rhode Island 
section. A IV22 graduate ol the Dental 

Department ol the University, Dr. 

Aisenherg has been associated with the 
Dental School as a member of its fac- 
ulty ever since. He founded the De- 
partment of Oral Pathology and in 
I 'mo was appointed Professor of Gen- 
eral and Oral Pathology. He is a past 
president of the Maryland State Dental 
Association, past president of the Na- 
tional Chapter of Alpha Omega and is 
past president of the American Acad- 
emj of Oral Pathology. He is a diplo- 
mate ol the American Board of Oral 
Patholog) and is now serving on the 
American Board of Oral Pathology. He 
is widely known tor his contributions 
to the literature of dentistry. 

At the third annual dinner meeting 
or the Rhode Island Section of the 
Alumni Association, which is held in 
conjunction with the Rhode Island 
State Dental Association, Dr. Joseph P. 
( appuccio. '46, was presented their 
Distinguished Alumni Award. This is 
a worthy tribute to a most deserving 
young man. 

Dr. Cappuccio is a graduate of the 
Rhode Island State College, earned his 
B.S. degree in 1943 and later his D.D.S. 
degree at the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery. Dental School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, in 1946. He was an 
intern in oral surgery at the Universitv 
of Maryland from 1946 to 1947, and 
completed his fellowship in oral sur- 
gery the following year at the same 
institution. In 1948 he was appointed 
instructor in oral surgery at the Dental 
School. He has remained with the teach- 
ing staff of his alma mater on a full 
time basis since 1948 and presently 
occupies the position of associate pro- 
fessor of Oral Surgery and Anesthesi- 
ology. 

On November 4. 1959. Dr. Gerard 
A. Devlin, '23. received the New Jer- 
sey Distinguished Alumnus Award. 
This indeed is a fitting tribute to a 
man who has always shown enthusiastic 
interest and support of his alma mater. 

Dr. Devlin was formerly associated 
with Dr. Harry E. Kelsey of Baltimore 
in the practice of orthodontics. In 1929 
he left Baltimore to engage in his spe- 
cialty in New Jerse\. where he has re- 
mained. He is a past president of his 
local dental society, a past president of 
the Middle Atlantic Society of Ortho- 
dontists and was elected president of 
the Alumni Association in 1957. but. 
bee. uise of his health, was unable to 
serve. He is a fellow of the American 
( ollege of Dentists and a tew \ears ago 
was elected to membership in Omicron 
Kappa Upsilon, honorary dental society. 



The gathering place for 
Vfarytanden of Good Taste 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 
1730 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 

Oped 'til Midnight— Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 



Potomac Butter Co. 

Wholesale Dealers 

Butter 

Eggs 

Cheese 

Frozen Eggs 

512 -12th St., S.W. 
ST 3-1341 



220 E Street. S.W. 

Washington. I). C. 



PURE 



Meat Products 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

Land Planning and Subdivision 

5905 RIGGS ROAD 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 
Telephone: HA 21600 



36 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Brnesi \ in irbonni i 

Dr. Brnesi A. Charbonnel, '97, oldest 
living Rhode Island graduate ol the 
Baltimore College ol Dental Surgery, 
Dental School. University of Maryland, 
received the Medal ol Awards From 
the Rhode Island State Denial Society 
on Januarj 16, I960, at the Biltmore 
Hotel in Providence. This award rep 
resents the highest honor that dentistry 
can bestow upon one of its colleagues 
in the state. 



Dr. Messore 

Dr. Michael B. Messore. '30, this past 
June was elected to membership in 
Omicron Kappa Upsilon. honorary 
dental society. He is the first Rhode 
Islander to receive this accolade. 



Elected 

Dr. Frank P. Gilley. Magna Cum 
Laude, Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Mankind. 1945, is now serving as 
President of the Maine Dental Associa- 
tion. Dr. Gilley practices Orthodontics 
in Bangor, Maine. 

Dr. Benjamin A. Brown, '28, of 
Ventnor, New Jersey, presently is serv- 
ing as President of the New Jersey 
State Dental Association. Dr. Brown 
has held important positions in the 
American Dental Association and was 
a member of New Jersey's delegation 
to that body. 

At the last meeting of the American 
Dental Association in New York City, 
Dr. Charles S. Jonas, '38, was inducted 
into the American College of Dentists. 



Appointed 

Dr. Milton B. Asbell, '38, was appoint- 
ed to the New Jersey State Board of 
Dental Examiners. Dr. Asbell has prac- 
ticed his chosen field of orthodontics 
in Camden, New Jersey, and has been 
for many years, very active in the affairs 
of dentistry on a local and national 
level. 

Dr. C. Frank Sabatino, '34, is pres- 
ently serving on the New Jersey State 
Board of Registration and Examination 
in Dentistry. Dr. Sabatino has been 
very active in civic as well as local, 
state and national dental organizations, 
having served as president of the Plain- 
field Dental Society and trustee of the 
New Jersey State Dental Society. 

A recent appointment to the Rhode 
Island State Board of Dental Examin- 
ers is Dr. Edward C. Morin, '20. Dr. 
Morin practices his specialty of oral 
surgery in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, 
and has been, for many years, most 
active in Rhode Island dentistry. 



STRONG 

as the strongest . . . 



as the safest . . . 

Dividends, computed at 4% per 
annum, paid quarterly on savings. 
79th year of prudent 
management. 



PERPETUAL 

HUILIHIVO ASSOCIATION 

Main Office: 11th and E Sts., N.W. 

Other offices conveniently located in 
Bethesda, Silver Spring and Prince Georges. 

"Washington's $300 Million 
Insured Savings Institution" 





QUAINT ACRES 
NURSERIES 



COMPLETE LINE OF 

NURSERY STOCK IN WIDE VARIETY 

LANDSCAPE SERVICE 

DORMANT SPRAYING 

TRANSPLANTING 

TREE MOVING 

PRUNING 



H. W. "Phoebe" 
Quaintance 
Class of *27 



COLESVILLE PIKE 

(U. S. 29) 

5 MILES FROM 

GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING, 

MARYLAND 

MA 2-1234 



WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 



HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Spring" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co. 




May-June, 1960 



37 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 




«0N« 



■Desl 






Olivet 



Road 




I 'OUCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRLLLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

MAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



auuntu o£ the 
35 tfeaM. 

LUSTIHE niEHOLSOII 

Phil ludlne . . . 
head ol bath companied 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHEONS 



fox**! 



CHARCOAL 



2637 Conn. Ave. N.W., Washington. D. C. 



Subscribe to 
MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



( ollege of 

I DUCATION 



Man J A luili 



Ni-w Head Coach ai 
Georoi Washington 

New head football coach at George 
Washington University is Bill Elias, '48. 

I lias played college football at 
Maryland and alter his graduation was. 
for five years, coach at Richmond. In- 
diana, high school. He conies to George 
Washington from the position of back- 
field coach at Purdue University. 



Si ye Assumes Command 

Captain Robert W. Slye. '36. recently 
assumed command of the Sanford Naval 
Air Station. Florida. 



College News 

Members of the staff of the College of 
Education contributed to the 59th 
Yearbook. I960. Rethinking Science 
Education, published by the National 
Society for the Study of Education: 
Chapter I — "The College Dean Looks 
at the Purposes of Science Teaching." 
Vernon E. Anderson. Dean of the Col- 
lege of Education: Chapter VII — "De- 
veloping Science Programs in the Ele- 
mentary School." and Chapter VIII — 
"Teaching and Evaluating Science in 
the Elementary School." Glenn O. 
Blough. Professor of Education: Chap- 
ter X — "Auxiliary Efforts to Improve 
the Secondary School Science Efforts." 
John P. Mayor. Professor of Education. 

At the American Association of 
School Administration Annual Meet- 
ings in Atlantic City on February 13- 
17. I960. Dr. Anderson served as in- 
terrogator for a discussion on "Conant 
Looks at Junior High Schools — A Pre- 
liminary Report": Dr. Clarence Newell. 
Professor of Education, discussed "New 
Knowledges and Skills Through Intern- 
ship"; Dr. Kenneth Hovet. Professor o\ 
Education, addressed a group on the 
topic "What The Test Makers Are 
Really Trying To Do" and Dr. Blough 
served as a member of the panel dis- 
cussing this same topic: Dr. Clemens 
Johnson. Associate Professor of Edu- 
cation, participated in a discussion 
group on the subject "New Develop- 
ments in Experimental Design and Sta- 



Student s Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



We 
DEVELOP LAND 

for 

its 
HIGHEST, BEST 

and most 
PROFITABLE USE 

for 
LAND OWNERS 

and 
INVESTORS 

HARRY A. BOSWELL CO., 

Inc. 

REALTORS 
3718 Rhode Island Avenue 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 
AP. 7-1111 



38 



the Mary i \ \ d Magazine 



iistK\ii Analysis"; Dr. James Hymes, 
Professor of Childhood Education, 
spoke on topic "Good KiiukMu.uii.Mis." 

Dr. Clemens Johnson and Dr. Rich 
ard Brandt, Professor with the Institute 
for Child Study, discussed with the 
Highland \ ievs I' I \ .1 report on Math- 
ematics in the Elemental") Schools ol 
Montgomery County. 

Ten students in the College of Edu- 
cation were initiated into Phi Kappa 
Phi at the beginning of I960: Jerold 
Coffee, Knee I '. COX, lna S. Diencr. 
Margaret L. Foster, Irvin D. Glick, Jo 
\im Greasley, Mary C. Kalbfleisch, 
Bernard Kaufman. Carole L. Santo. 
Theresa J. Tierney. Students enrolled 
in student teaching in the College of 
Education who were also initiated into 
Phi Kappa Phi are: Barbara Ci. Daw- 
son. Gloria J. Hack. Joyce T. Horrell. 
Miriam A. Lavine, Barbara E. Shufelt, 
and Jacqueline E. Spencer. 

Dr. Anderson met with the princi- 
pals of Wicomico County High Schools 
on March 2. 1960, to discuss "The 
Problem of Articulation from Grades 1 
through 12." 

Dr. Gladys A. Wiggin, Professor of 
Education, spoke at the meeting of the 
representatives of the Regional Even- 
ing Colleges on May 6 on the College 
Park campus and also led a discussion 
following her talk. 

Dr. Mabel S. Spencer, Head of Home 
Economics Education, has written an 
article, "Home Economics Education 
— Changes in Content Methods, and 
Emphases During the Past Fifty Years," 
for Forecast Magazine. This article 
covers the period in the development 
of Home Economics Education from 
the early nineteen hundreds to the 
present time. 

Dr. Helen Garsten, Dr. M. L. Keedy, 
Associate Directors, and Dr. John R. 
Mayor, Director of the University of 
Maryland Mathematics Project at Col- 
lege Park, present a complete descrip- 
tion of the project in operation in Vol- 
ume VIII, No. 2, February, 1960, "The 
Arithmetic Teacher" published by the 
National Council of Teachers of Math- 
ematics. 

Dr. Orval L. Ulry, Director of Sum- 
mer School, announces the completion 
of the Bulletin "A Study of the Rela- 
tionship Between Subjects Taken and 
Other Selected Factors for the Class of 
1958, Maryland Public High Schools" 
for which the material was collected 
through the cooperation of the Mary- 
land State Department of Education 
and the General Research Board of the 
University. 

Dr. James L. Hymes participated as 
speaker at four National Conferences: 
Association for Supervision and Cur- 
riculum Development in Washington, 
D. C, "Family Living Affects Children's 

(Continued on next page) 




Completely Modern 

Throughout For Your 

Dininq Enjoyment 

Ledo 
Restauranl 

2420 UNIVERSITY 
LANE 

Hyattsville, Md. 
Superbly Prepared Food 



* AMERICAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE 
• PIZZA PIES BAKED TO ORDER 
• BEVERAGES AND MIXED DRINKS 



Phone: HArrison 2-8622 



• COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
• INCREASED SEATING 
• BANQUET FACILITIES 

Phone: HArrison 2-8122 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







ALLIANCE PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

PLUMBING and HEATING CONTRACTORS 

1360 OKIE ST., N.E. LA 6-3753 

WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



College Park's Newly Appointed 
ENGLISH FORD DEALER 

ABBY MERCURY, INC. 

Mercury Sales and Service 
8320 BALTIMORE BOULEVARD 
25 Years' Experience in SALES & SERVICE 
ABBY ROSENDORF, President TOwer 9-6000, College Park, Md. 



TOWER 9-6204 = 



JIMMIE PORTER 
Trading as 

KIERNAN'S 

A Complete Line of Beverages 
8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

2 Miles North — University of Maryland 

AAA — Duncan Hines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phones WE 5-6291 



May-June, 1960 



39 



To Save Time . . . 
To Save Money . . . 
In Your Business 

This is our job ... to help design 
form thai gel work done faster and 

e.isicr ... to produce forms by the 

most economical methods adaptable 

to >our needs. 




The Baltimore Business Forms spe- 
cialist in your community is a man 
devoted to a career of designing 
forms that save you time . . . save you 
money. Consult him whenever you 
think of business forms. 

Baltimore Business Forms 

Phone CE 3-8000 

Talbot (Tol) T. Speer (Class of 1917) 
Charles F. Ellinger (Class of 1937) 



Thomas & Thompson Co 

Established 1872 

The Downtown 
Prescription Drug Store 

Have Your Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded by 

PERSCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

at Baltimore and Light Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

— Delivery Service — 

TELEPHONE 

SAratoga 7-2960 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St., S.E. 

Lincoln 3-8151 

Virginia residents JEfferson 4-1110 

Northwest and suburban LOckwood 5-3556 

Baltimore MEdford 3-6500 

Towson VAIley 5-7133 

Glen Burnie SOuthfield 1-0550 

Annapolis COIonial 8-3451 

OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 

MARYLAND 



Living in School"; White House Con- 
ference on Children and Youth in 
Washington, I) ( . "Blue Print for the 
Future"; Association tor childhood 

Education International in ( leveland. 

Ohio, "Good Beginnings lor All Chil- 
dren"; American Association ol School 
Administrators in Atlantic City, "Good 
Kindergartens." 

Over 2500 junior and senior high 
school students and educators and in- 
dustrialists from various parts of the 
state visited the Department ol Indus- 
trial Education at its Annual Open 
House on March 18 in the J. M Pat- 
terson Building. The event featured 
activities carried on in the Department, 
an exhibition of the varied facilities and 
several exhibits from the public schools 
Mr. Earl Bowler of the U. S. Office 
of Education was speaker at an open 
meeting during the day. 

The Presidents Conference on Oc- 
cupational Safety — Washington. D. C. 
— The following members of the Indus- 
trial Education staff participated: Ed- 
mund Crosby. Dr. Paul E. Harrison. 
Dr. Donald Maley. Dr. William F. 
Tierney, Kenneth Dawson and Henrv 
J. Rokusek. 

A nationwide research project spon- 
sored by the American Industrial Arts 
Association is being conducted under 
the direction of Mr. James Hammond 
of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, in the In- 
dustrial Education Department. This 
project is concerned with the study of 
outstanding programs in Industrial Arts 
at the junior and senior high school 
levels. 

The Industrial Education Department 
is currently developing a "Materials 
Testing Laboratory" which will contain 
a variety of testing machines and facili- 
ties for material analysis. The develop- 
ment of such a center is consistent with 
pioneering procedures and activities 
currently being carried on in the De- 
partment and will be used as an adjunct 
to activities carried on in other areas 
of the Department. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 



R. M. Rivello 



Hello Promoted by Martin 
Company 

Mr. Bastian Hello. B.S. '48 in M.E. 
I Aero. Option), has been made Man- 
ager of P5M and Miscellaneous In the 
Martin Co. o\ Baltimore. Maryland. 
Mr. Hello who has been with the Mar- 



PAVING SUPPLY 

AND 
EQUIPMENT CO. 

Sales ' Rental • Service 

Construction Equipment 

MICHIGAN MICHIGAN 

Tractor Shovels Tractor Scrapers 



ESSICK 

Vibratory 

Rollers 

OLIVER 

Crawler 

Bulldozers 



INSLEY 

Backhoes — 

Cranes 

JOY 
Universal 

Scaffolding 



BALTIMORE: 

701 Bonaparte Avenue 
Telephone BEImont 5-2227 

WASHINGTON: 

10th & Girard Sts., N.E. 
Telephone DUpont 7-3700 



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



ZSSKAV 

lftQUALITYflsf 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
Wm. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDLE CO. 



F. A. Davis & Sons 


WHOLESALERS 


Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 


Kitchen & Dining Equipment 


Soda Fountain Supplies 


119 S. HOWARD STREET 


Baltimore 1, Md. 



40 



THE M A R Y I A N D M A (I A Z I N 1 



(in Company since 1951 u.in in charge 
ol phases ol the B-57 Canberra pro- 
gram before becoming associated with 
the P5M. Prior to thai he u.is .it Wright 
I ield, Ohio. 



Dr. Bow i i -> (. ki di i in \\ 1 1 n 
Ki voi i i ion \m Invi n i ion 



Dr. Ronald E. Bowles, B.S. '47. MS 
'48, and Ph.D. '57 in M.F... was one ol 
three civilian scientists at the Army's 
Diamond Ordnance Fuze Laboratories 
in Washington. D. C\. who were cred- 
ited with the invention of a family of 
control devices which use gas or liquids 
instead of electric current to operate 
the units and which have no moving 
parts. The inventors have successfully 
developed units which can perform 
amplification, feedback, digital compu- 
tation, analog computation, normal 
mathematical functions, and memory. 
It is expected that the invention will 
have widespread usage in both military 
and industrial equipment and take a 
place in hydraulic and pneumatic sys- 
tems similar to the position that the 
vacuum tube and transistor occupy in 
the field of electricity. 

Dr. Bowles is currently Chief of the 
Non-Radio Systems Branch at DOFL. 



Dr. Jaffee Speaks to I.A.S. 



Dr. Robert I. Jaffee, Ph.D. in Ch.E. 
'43, recently spoke on the subject "Re- 
fractory Materials" at the 28th Annual 
Meeting of the Institute of the Aeronau- 
tical Sciences in New York City. Dr. 
Jaffee is presently Division Chief of the 
Nonferrous Physical Metallurgy Divi- 
sion of the Battelle Memorial Institute 
of Columbus, Ohio. 



Morris Appointed to D. C. 
Planning Committee 



Mr. Robert L. Morris, B.S. '45, M.S. 
'50 in C.E., was one of three top level 
staff members appointed by the Nation- 
al Capital Downtown Committee to 
prepare plans for a revitalization of 
Washington's downtown business area. 
Mr. Morris, who is acting assistant com- 
missioner of traffic for the City of Bal- 
timore, will be in charge of the trans- 
portation aspects of the study. He has 
been working on Baltimore traffic prob- 
lems for the last three years. 

(Continued on next page) 



HARRIS & BROOKS, Inc 



EXCAVATORS 



2413 Blue Ridge Ave. 



LO 5-0867 
LO 5-0868 



Wheaton, Md. 



TH0MSS0N STEEL CO., Inc. 

5106 Baltimore Avenue 
HYATTSYILLE, MD. AP 7-3201 



GUa+teql CfGSiaye 
24-HOUR TOWING SERVICE 

WArfield 7-9710 



7505 BALTIMORE AVEXl'E 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGN 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C 



BRIGGS 

Construction Co., Inc. 

CUSTOM HOMES 

Repairs - Remodeling 



BETHESDA, MD. 



OL 6-4545 



FRANK B. JONES 

OPTICIAN 

Over 30 Years Experience 

Dispensing and Manufacturing 
Modern Eye Wear 

Complete Optical Laboratory 
on Premises 

JUniper 9-8780 

8482 Fenton St. Silver Spring, Md. 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Max-June, 1960 



41 




YOU LI ALWAYS GET A 

WHALE OF A DEAL 

ON A BRAND NEW 1960 

• PONTIAC 
or*RENAULT 

IN COLLEGE PARK . . . 

STANDARD 

PONTIAC RENAULT 

7125 BALTIMORE AVE. 
APpleton 7-4282 

2 Blocks from the University 



AVON TILE COMPANY, Inc. 

6120 Kansas Ave. N.W. 

TU 2-8255 

Washington. DC. 



Finer Foods Since 1S58 




\\ uhington, I). C 



Otfirial E.tinr Place 
of the Alumni 

1 107 Connecticut \v e 

Nnt to 

thf \t»>flowrr lintel 



Hi mm WITH Hi ki m c.i Ki • i \m\ii<»s 

Mr 1 dward k Bcbb, US in ( 1 
is current!) Property Management Spe- 
cialist uith the Division ol Propert) 
Management ol the Bureau ol Recla- 
mation, Washington, I) < Mr. Bebb 
has been uuh the Bureau since 1950, 



K(, I IS DlSIKK I I ssii M \\\(,l K 

Mr 1 dwin W. I nyhs. B.S. '43 in M 1 
was recentl) appointed district manager 
lor the entire Washington area by 1 sso 

Standard. Mr. Inglis h.is been assistant 
manager ol the Washington area since 
\ i )>f-> and was associated with Esso's 

Baltimore office prior to that. 



W HI KI vftol is 

Mr. Constantine Makrides, B.S. in M.I 
'48, is division engineer in charge ol 
Mechanical Hngineering for John I. 
Thompson and Company ol Washing- 
ton. D. C. He has recently become a 
registered professional engineer. 

Mr. Richard L. McKisson, B.S. in 
C.E. '59, is uith the Denver headquar- 
ters of Bureau of Reclamation. 

Edward A. Miller. '50, was recently 
appointed manager of the Discoverer 
Program in the General Electric Com- 
pany's Missile and Space Vehicle De- 
partment at Philadelphia. 

Ben Barish. "47. has been named 
head of a new Project Management De- 
partment in the Tapco Group of 
Thompson Ramo Wooldridge, Inc. 

Joseph T. Cook. '34. recently marked 
his 20th anniversary uith the Colgate- 
Palmolive Company. 

Harry B. Dixon. Jr.. '50, has been 
appointed central regional service man- 
ager for the Controls Division of Hagan 
Chemicals & Controls. Inc.. Pittsburgh. 



Kisi\K(H Fellowships Established 

A Research Fellowship Foundation has 
been established by the National Sand 
and Gravel Assn. and the National 
Read) Mixed Concrete Assn. to sup- 
port graduate study and research lead- 
ing to the master's and the Doctor's 
degrees in civil engineering. Since 1939 
these associations have supported a 
Joint Research Laboratory at the L ni- 
versitv under the direction of Stanton 
Walker, director o\ research for the 
association. The neu foundation has 
been established to promote basic re- 
searches into the properties of mineral 
aggregates and concrete and to studv 
problems related to the sand and gravel 
and ready-mixed concrete industries. 



^tirij ^Jable yJveriooh.s 
I tiling si. in L uitnlrit siilt 



Olney In 



\ 



"Old Plantation Recipes" 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 

(Ctoet <! .!/• 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

BRIDGE PARTIES. WEDDINGS, 

BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 

OLNEY. MARYLAND 

— - A Parking S price — 

PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

Gert.. 



Bacon for 




Albert F. Goetze. Inc 

CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore. Md. 



WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 

Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION WITHOUT 

OBLIGATION 

4904 WISCONSIN AVE. N.W. 

EM 3-9660 Washington, D. C. 

4701 YORK ROAD 
ID 5-4535 Baltimore, Md. 



42 



T II I M \ R Y 1 \ \ n M. AGAZINl 



McFaddi n Honored 

( harles P. McFadden, '26, w.in recently 
named "Engineer of the Year" by Ihe 
Suffolk Countj Chapter oi the New 
York State Societj ol Professional En- 
gineers. Mr. McFadden received tins 
honor in recognition ol bis outstanding 
services to the engineering profession 
and to the public in Suffolk County as 
Town Engineer in the Town of Hunt- 
ington. 



Cashi i i Promoi i d 

( harles F. Cashell, '31, recently re- 
ceived a certificate marking his promo- 
tion to a CiS-15 employee at the U. S. 
\iniv Engineer Research and Develop- 
ment Laboratories, Fort Belvoir. Mr. 
Cashell is Assistant Chief of the Elec- 
trical Engineering Department. 



School of 



LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Rciblich 



275 Attend Banquet 

More than 275 alumni of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Law 
attended the annual banquet of the 
Alumni Association April 9 at the 
Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel in Baltimore. 

Miss Mary Arabian, '44 and Presi- 
dent of the Association, presided as 
toastmaster. She thanked all contribu- 
tors for sending their contributions this 
year through the Greater University of 
Maryland Fund, and introduced the 
Honorable Joseph L. Carter, Chairman 
of the Scholarship Fund Committee for 
the Law School, and A. E. Cormeny, 
Director of Endowment and Develop- 
ment for the University. 

The following officers for 1960-61 
were elected unanimously and intro- 
duced individually by the Chairman of 
the Nominating Committee, Benjamin 
B. Rosenstock, '25: President, Layman 
J. Redden, '34; First Vice-President, 
Hon. Emory H. Niles, '17; Second Vice- 
President, Hon. W. Albert Menchine, 
'29; Third Vice-President, Rignal W. 
Baldwin, '27; Secretary-Treasurer, G. 
Kenneth Reiblich, '29. Executive Com- 
mittee: Samuel W. Barrick, '52; Thomas 

(Continued on next page) 



BARBER & ROSS CO 

EST. 1876 

2323 - 4th St. N. E. Washington, D. C. 

DEcatur 2-0501 



FREE DELIVERY 



FREE PARKING 



SUPPLIER & DISTRIBUTOR OF THESE MAJOR ITEMS 

Builders Hardware — Power Tools — Package Homes 

Major Appliances — Structural Steel — Lumber 

Jalousie Doors — Aluminum Windows — Millwork 

Paint — General Hardware — Kitchen Cabinets 

Metal Bucks & Doors 



JUniper 9-4580 



JUniper 9-3340 



A. MYRON COWELL, Inc. 

MASONRY- CONTRACTORS 

8416 Ramsey Ave. Silver Spring, AAd. 



s 


IlltilX. 
PROCESS 




BOOKBINDING 


Every 


Type Fop Every Purpose 


A Com 


plete Printers Finishing Service 




9401 Baltimore Blvd. 




WE 5-6884 




COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



'. For All Your Flora 

Corsages 
'• Bouquets 


Needs '. 
Plants j 


WJg?'"! 


k\ 


■ NAtional 8-0106 FLORISTS ■ 
\ 900 Fourteenth St., N.W. 


; Washington, D. 


c. ■ 



WINDOW - ON - THE - KITCHEN 

Kitchetesiia 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food . . . All our desserts are 
home-made popular prices 

no tipping . . . air conditioned 

BREAKFAST ■ LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee 5c a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 

11th Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 

11th & E Sts., N.W. Washington, D.C. 



Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE CO. 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limestone 
Granite Marble 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 

Washington 18, D. C. 



May-June, 1960 



43 



Clifton D. Mayhew, 
Inc. 

Painting & Decorating 
( ontractors 



&*£%** 




5 i $6 Lee Highway 
JAckson 5-6131 

Arlington, Va. 



THE ^=^=^^^ 
LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

LA our Jjrrienatu ^A/oj/j 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland. 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Phone AP 7-4493 

For Reservations 

Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



BETHESDA CINDER BLOCK 
MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

Complete Line of 

MASONRY SUPPLIES 

BRICK - CINDER BLOCK 

River Rd. at B & O R.R. OL 4-1616 

BETHESDA, MB. 



Class 1928 
Insurance of all Kinds 

UN, on 4-1 100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



N Berry, "40; Richard w ( ase, '42; 
(Lire Green Duckett, '34; Samuel J 
Fisher, '09; Hamilton P. Fox, Jr.. '47; 
I). is kI Harkness, '38; Kenneth C. Proc- 
tor, '32; Emma S. Robertson. '40; 
Marvin H. Smith. '4 1. 

Miss Arabian then introduced the 
guests ol honor: Wilson H. r Ikins. 

President ol the University; Albin O. 
Kuhn, I necutive Vice President ol the 
l Diversity; ( hiei Judge Simon 1 
Sobeloff, 15. and Judge Morris A. 
Soper, '95, I S 1 ourth ( ircuil ( ourl 

ol Appeals; Judges W, ( alvin ( hesnut. 
'94, Ros/el ( Ihomsen. '22. and R. 
Dorse) Watkins, '25, U. S. District 
( ourt; Chief Judge Frederick W. Brune 
and Judge Hall Hammond. '25. Court 
ol Appeals of Maryland; Chief Judge 
I mors H. Niles. '17. Supreme Bench 
ol Baltimore City; Maryland Attorney 
General C. Ferdinand Sybert. '25; Leon 
H. A. Pierson, '23. U. S. Attorney for 
Maryland; Enos S. Stockbridge. '10, 
member of the Board of Regents of the 
University; and Rignal \V. Baldwin. '27. 
President of the Baltimore City Bar 
Association. 

Dean Roger Howell welcomed the 
graduating class to future membership 
in the association and awarded honors 
to the following students: 

Order of the Coif: William A. Agee. 
Allan B. Blumberg. Norman E. Burke. 
Eugene H. Schreiber, George J. Sills. 
Jr.. Alva P. Weaver. III. 

Honorary Membership — Order of the 
Coif: Enos S. Stockbridge. 

Maryland Law Review Certificates: 
Allan B. Blumberg. Norman E. Burke. 
Benjamin N. Dorman, Stephen M. 
Ehudin. Edward J. Fisher. III. Julian 
I. Jacobs. Howard J. Needle. Robert E. 
Powell. Eugene H. Schreiber. Harry E. 
Silverwood. Jr.. Alva P. Weaver. III. 
Beverly R. Williford. 

Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll Chesnut 
Prize: William A. Agee. 

The Sam Allen Memorial Prize: Nor- 
man E. Burke. 

Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation 
Prize: William A. Agee. 

The Nu Beta Epsilon Prize: Robert 
E. Powell. 

Samuel S. Levin Prize: Benjamin N. 
Dorman. 

U. S. Law Week Award: Sander L 

W ISC. 

Wall Street Journal Student Achieve- 
ment Award: Eugene H. Schreiber. 

John I. Fey. '40. President of the 
University of Vermont, who delivered 

the principal address, called on all law- 
yers to foster a new respect for law and 

nuhts oi the indi\ k1u.i1. 




PAINT IS 
YOUR BEST 
AID TO HOME 
BEAUTY! 



qualify points 
cost so 
little more! 



Visit any of these 

WINSLOW STORES 

922 New York Ave , N W. NA. 8-8610 

3754 Minn. Ave., N.E. III. 1-6756 
5418 Queen, Chapel Rd , Hyatt, 

WA. 7-2222 

7514 Wise. Ave , Beth . Md. OL 4-4160 

8211 Go. Ave., $. S., Md JU 9-2284 
5307 Balto Ave , Hyatt, , Md. 

WA 7-1180 

3211 10th St., N , Arl ., Va JA 5-7878 

1239 Wiscomin Ave., N.W. FE 3-7667 
500 Hungerford Drive, 

Rockville, Md. GA 4 8555 
• FREE PARKING 



HUFFER-SHINN 
Optical 
Company, Inc. 

Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET, N.W. 

NAtional 8-1457 Washington, D. C. 





• j* /m*^-^ 


■ / # ^M f/jM 


0f^ 




SALES 




INSURANCE 


PROPERTY 


MANAGEMENT 


Sear I'nirei 


' MariilciJid 


WArfield 
6037 Bolt 


7-1010 & 7-0321 
more Boulevard 


RIVERDALE, MD. 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pesf Control Service 
928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



44 



T H E MaRYI AND MAGAZINE 



"Unless wc can preserve Ihe rule ol 
law . . . there can be no individual free 
dom, and the basis ol American democ 
racj w ill perish," be said, 

Dr. I ej cited recent instances ol dis 
respect foi the rule ol law, in some ol 

which lawyers themselves were guilly 
of attacks upon the courts. 

I aw vers should, he said, by virtue 
ol their training and profession, take 
the lead in calmly delineating the issues 
ol the daj and should point to courses 
ol action consistent with the tenets ol 
the American Constitution. 



Smouse Made Assistant 
Attorney for Maryland 

H. Russell Smouse. '58, has been named 
as an Assistant United States Attorney 
for Maryland. The announcement of 
his appointment was made by Leon H. 
A. Pierson, United States Attorney for 
Maryland. 

Mr. Smouse previously served as an 
attorney in the torts section of the civil 
division of the Justice Department. He 
obtained that position under the honor 
program of Attorney General Rogers. 



Mathias Files for Republican 
Nomination 

Charles McC. Mathias, Jr., Law '49, 
recently filed for the Republican nom- 
ination to represent Maryland's 6th Dis- 
trict in Congress, a contest which will 
be decided by a May 17 primary. Mr. 
Mathias is presently Republican repre- 
sentative of Frederick County in the 
Maryland House of Delegates. He has 
served two years as Assistant Attorney 
General of Maryland and as Frederick 
City Attorney. He was the only Repub- 
lican elected to his county's delegation 
in 1958. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Fund Honors Dr. Edwards 

The establishment of an endowment 
fund honoring Dr. C. Reid Edwards, 
who has been Professor of Surgery at 
the School of Medicine for many years, 
was announced recently at a luncheon 
held in his honor at the Western Elec- 
tric Baltimore Works. 

(Continued on next page) 



1,1! M BER 
• MILLWORK 

• BUILDER'S HARDWARE 
• PITTSBU RGH PA] NTS 

"Siher Spring's iirst Lumber Yard" 




SILVER ^gpr SPRING 
BUILDING SUPPLY CO 



8226 GEORGIA AVENUE AT RIPLEY ST. 
JUniper 9-2300 SILVER SPRING, MD. 



Johnston, Lemon & Co 

MEMBER PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



SOUTHERN BUILDING 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3130 



115 N. ST. ASAPH 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SUGRUE— PRES. 



NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY. Inc. 



SALES 



ucyrd 



SERVICE 



8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. 



COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. • 

WHOLESALE ONLY 
1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete 

AIR CONDITIONING. REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 
MARYLAND, VIRGINIA AND 
WEST VIRGINIA 

Member A.R.W. 
HO. 2-2600 

• WASHINGTON 9. D. C. • 



May-June, 1960 



Murray Hardware Co. 

Your Hardware Department 
Store 

Open Daily 9 to 9 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

UNIVERSITY BLVD. and 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 

LANGLEY PARK, MD. 

HEmlock 4-3000 



45 



r-JL (I II L' f <> III 

Motet 

OCEAN CITY. MD. 

BETWEEN 8lh ond 9lh 
On Boardwalk 

AT. 9 7970 



M<|> Mary B. Ouillen 



lii addition to his association with 
the Medical School staff, which dates 
back to his internship in 1913, Dr. 
I dwarda was Works Surgeon at the 

Western I lectric ( ompany from 1929 
to 1953. In recognition of his long and 
outstanding service to both organiza- 
tions, the Western 1 lectric Company 
has made a substantial contribution to 
the fund. 

Because Ol Dr. Edwards' special in- 
terest in the graduate training of young 
physicians, the hind will he used large- 
ly tO support clinical research. 



Dr. Edwards is a graduate ol the 
School ol Medicine. With the exception 
ol years spent in active duly in World 
War I. he has been associated with 
the school ever since his graduation. 
both on the teaching star! and as a 
clinical surgeon at University Hospital. 



Stoni Rt I ik 1 B 

Mr. Joseph P. Stone, who retired re- 
cently alter 44 years as a laboratory 
technician in the School of Medicine. 
was honored at a luncheon upon the 
occasion ol his retirement. 



Harrison 

Hall 

Finest Resort Hotel 
In Maryland 

117 OCEAN COOLED ROOMS 

Open MAY 19 through 

SEPT. 26th 

t ONVEM I ion FACILITIES 

BLEVATOB BEBVICE 

OCEAN DINING BOOM 

l i ROPEAN PLAN] 

PRIVATE H A l II IN EVERY ROOM 
MR. I MRS (. HALE HARRISON MANAGERS-OWNERS 

BOARDWALK AT 15TH ST., PHONE OCEAN CITY AT 9-6222 
NEWEST HOTEL IN OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 




Spend Your Vacation Having Fun In 

OCEAN CITY S 

MARYLAND COURSE 

ALL SPORTS AND AMUSEMENTS 

PLAN NOW TO VISIT DURING THE SUMMER 
REGARDLESS OF HOW LONG THE VISIT OR 
THE BUDGET YOU'LL FIND WHAT YOU LIKE 

in OCEAN CITY. MD. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, WRITE 

INFORMATION CENTER OCEAN CITY, MD. 





Dr. B. L. Join 



Dr. Jones Takes Staff Posiimn 

Dr. Bryant L. Jones, '44. was recently 
appointed to the staff in the medical 
service division of CIBA Pharmaceu- 
tical Products, Inc. Dr. Jones had been 
in private practice in Glen Burnie. Md.. 
until he took up his new duties with 
C IBA. He was active as a medical 
newspaper columnist for The Star and 
I he Arundel Observer. 







;, ., fw : 3if i^pwc?»i 



III II " 



George Washington Hotel 

BOARDWALK at 10th STREET 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 
Mr. ond Mrs. Franklin Hastings — owners & managers 

Completely Redecorated 
126 BEDROOMS and DINING ROOM 
Air-Conditioned Bedrooms on Request 
NEW NEW 




COFFEE SHOP 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



EUROPEAN PLAN 
Centrally Located to all Churches 

Phone OCEAN CITY ATlantic 9-6271 



46 



i he Mar vi and Magazine 




School ••! 

nursinc; 



HI V r EXCHANGER FOR HI \R 1 -LUNG MA- 

chine. Developed by Dr. William G. 
Esmond. Department of Surgery, Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Medicine. 



Heart-Lung Machine Improved 

Open heart surgery is being made safer 
and easier through improvements in a 
heart-lung machine being developed 
by Dr. William G. Esmond at the 
School of Medicine with the aid of a 
continuation grant of $20,968 from the 
National Institutes of Health. 

The purpose of a heart-lung machine 
is to provide artificial circulation dur- 
ing operations upon the open heart. 
When the patient's blood is shunted 
through the machine his own heart can 
be stopped and the surgeon can repair 
any defects in a bloodless area. Hun- 
dreds of people are alive today only 
because this procedure has made pos- 
sible surgical repair of their hearts. 

Basic features of all such machines 
are simple and are somewhat similar. 
But ways to improve the machine and 
make its blood-purifying effect more 
like the body's own circulation are being 
looked for constantly. One improve- 
ment, development of a new oxygena- 
tor, which serves as the lung unit in 
the machine, was announced in 1958 
by Dr. Esmond and Dr. R. Adams 
Cowley, chief thoracic surgeon at Uni- 
versity Hospital. 

This oxygenator, made of plastic, 
is disposable — it can be used once and 
thrown away. At University Hospital, 
where it has been in use for many 
months, it solves problems that had 
been encountered in cleaning and ster- 
ilizing the stainless steel oxygenators 
previously used. 

This improvement and other more 
recent changes are all incorporated in 
a new heart-lung machine that starts 
quantity production this week by a 
team of local firms, working in coop- 
eration with Dr. Esmond. 



/ ////< M I 



SHOR1 COURSI s Pi \\\i D 

rhree nursing institutes are being 

planned by the School of Nursing lor 
the coming year under the direction ol 



Dean Florence \i Gipe .> i ut members 
oi the faculty 

i he in -i coui ■• ( ardiova iii.. i 
Nursing will be held lune 20 lul I 
and \\ ill be conducted bj ( arol \i 
Hosfeld, head ol the graduate program 
in nursing; Bettj Lou Shubkagel, who 
heads the undergraduate program ol 
medic. ii and surgical nursing; Rmli 
Dyson, nutritionist; and othei i 

Several members ol the Medical 

School faculty Will also assist in the 

program, as will members ol the Mar) 
( ( ontinued on page 5 I ) 



cAtlantlc Sand J Motel 



OCEAN FRONT at MARYLAND AVENUE 
REHOBOTH BEACH, DELAWARE 

Rehoboth Beach's Newest, Largest and 
Ultra-Modern Vacationers Paradise 



68 FIREPROOF UNITS 

FACING THE ATLANTIC OCEAN 

HEATED POOL 

• Rooms Have Telephones 

• Television 

• Air Conditioning 

• Baseboard Hot Water Heat 

• Year Round Accommodations 

• Elevator Service 

One Section 4 Stories High — You Can See Cape May From Top Elevation 



May-June, 1960 



47 



four old fur made 
into a beautiful 

CAPE or J 

STOLE 




STORE YOUR 

FUR NOW! 

LE 9-4900 



M* 



w^asat&f 



225 N. Howard St., Baltimore 



H\ Sun I U51N ()(,di N 

Vacations .ire the theme of the du\ 
and the Ml rROPOLITAN POURISl 

(oMI'Wi Ol LI 15 North ( harles 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland, is buzzing 
uith the activity ol requests tor reserva- 
tions to far awa) places tor their many 
clients, some ol whom thev have served 
since the company was organized in 
1925. 

I the! ( Einstein, a dynamic indi- 
vidual, is the president of the firm which 
is the largest independent travel bureau 
in the State ol Maryland. She person- 
all) loves to travel and has gone around 
the world mam times. 

By consulting Metropolitan Tourist 
Company, a traveler gets facts which 
can be immediately procured lor them 
and. in many cases, can avoid serious 



« 



04 



FRANKLIN UNIFORM CO. 

Uniform Satisfaction 

PHYSICIANS DENTISTS NURSES 

MAIDS WAITRESSES BEAUTICIANS 

— Stores Located — 



235 PARK AVENUE 

BALTO. 1, MD. 

MU 5-7222 

712 E. GRACE ST. 

RICHMOND 19, VA. 

Ml 4 2685 



900 11th ST N.W. 

WASH. 1, D.C. 

EX 3-8200 

515 BOUSH ST. 

NORFOLK 10, VA. 

MA 7-3639 



Vulaat cS/iop 
PRINCt G9ORG0 F-INE5T MtN'J WEAR 5T0RE 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 

Dobbs Hats • Bostonian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

UNion 4-1312 



xxxxxxxxxxxxx 

X 

I A LITTLE BIT OF NORWAY 

1 IN MARYLAND 

X 

BERTH A L. KNUDT SEN'S GIFT SHOP 

Hand made decorative Sweaters and Socks for the Collegian and Sportsman 
• (iifts For The Bride 

• China and fine Glassware from Norway 

• Native dolls in hand made costumes 



EVNA ROAD, PARKTON, MD. 



X 
Tel.: FLanders 7-5519 x 

i : 1 1. ■ r.- .iri\ «■ north to Towaon, out on the Etarrisburg Expieuu way to Route liiT. turn X 
huht to Hi I i.l. thou left and .lrn. Bvna Road, make I rik-ht turn and ride X 

X 

exxxxxxxxxxxxx 



Man4fland 



inconveniences. delav and frequently 

added expense. 

Metropolitan Tourist Company, as 
well as all other tra\el agencies, do not 
charge their customers a regular fee 
lor services, but subsist chiefly on com- 
missions from transportation companies 
and hotels. 

Metropolitan Tourist Company ser- 
vice is unmatched in this area and the 
average person doesn't realize what a 
good travel agent goes through to re- 
lieve the traveler of the picky, tedious, 
time-consuming details of trip planning. 
The average person, with a limited 
knowledge of hotels and transportation, 
will spend weeks outlining their own 
itinerary and then find that they ha\e 
slipped up on certain details. 

When you travel under the guidance 
of a good travel agent. \ou travel eco- 
nomically and well. You will receive 
tips on the proper clothes to earn at 
certain times of the year for afloat or 
ashore. You will be told whom to tip. 
You will be helped with your passport 
and visas. 

Metropolitan takes the kinks out of 
travel. In addition to issuing your trans- 
portation tickets, your hotel accommo- 
dations, sightseeing excursions, and 
baggage transfer, they will handle money 
exchange and secure travelers checks 
and even take care of baggage insur- 
ance if desired. 



Right now the hotels and motels ol 
the Eastern Shore of Maryland and 
Delaware are being deluged with reser- 
vations for the holiday-seeking visitors. 



ZJhe Shade Shop 

and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Street, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FEderal 7-1200 

Manufacturers and Distributors 
if Window Shades 
if Venetian Blinds 
if Folding Doors 
if Draperies and Rods 
if Screens 
if Inside Shutters 
if Porch Shades 
if Vertical Blinds 
if Decorative Wood Coverings 



48 



I HE M ARYLAND MAGAZINE 



14J< 



amen 



who soon will be enjoying the velvety 

inviting sands oi Rehobotfa Beach and 

Ocean CitJ OQ the Atlantic Ocean. 

The ATLANTIC SANDS MOTEL. 
which was built in l l )5 l >. is the tnosl 
modern and beautiful motel in Reho- 
both Beach. Delaware. It is located on 
the Ocean at Maryland Avenue. It is 
a four-story luxury motel which offers 
year 'round accommodations. 

Mr. Frank S. Parker, owner and 
builder of the Atlantic Sands, has added 
many extras — not usually found in 
most motels. Each room has telephone 
connections, television, air conditioning 
m\A baseboard heat. The furnishings are 
ultra modern and very attractive. 

On a clear day from the Sun Deck 
of the fourth floor, one can plainly see 
Cape May, New Jersey, which lies miles 
away to the North. 

There are 68 fireproof luxury units 
each facing the ocean and all equipped 
with a sun deck for vacationing at its 
best. 

Mr. Parker has been in the construc- 
tion business for many years and his 
ability is evidenced in this perfectly 
beautiful vacation spot. The Atlantic 
Sands offers every comfort and luxury 
for the vacationer. 



The GEORGE WASHINGTON 
HOTEL in Ocean City, Maryland, is 
owned and operated by Mr. and Mrs. 
Franklin Hastings. It is one of the fine 
hotels of the beach which has been 
completely modernized and redecorated. 

The George Washington, with its 
splendor and graciousness of yesteryear, 



AYIGNONE FRERES 



Town and Country 

Caterers for 

Luncheons - Teas - Dinners 
Weddings & Cocktail Receptions 

Candy and Other Delicacies 
Gift Packages and Baskets 
Shipped all over the World 

Restaurant 
Luncheons - Dinners 
At Reasonable Prices 

1777 COLUMBIA ROAD, N.W. 
Columbia 5-0332 Washington, D. C. 



is still otw of the most popular ol all 

the resort hotels. The food and service 

rank among the best. Here the charm 

ol the hotel and the Southern hospital- 
it) that exists, bring guests back \e.u 

after year. 

* * * 

HARRISON HALL. Ocean City's 
newest hotel, is owned and operated 
by Mr. and Mrs. Ci. Hale Harrison. It 
is located on the Boardwalk al 15th 
Street and every room either faces the 
Atlantic Ocean or the Bay and some 
rooms have views with both exposures. 

The hotel has recently added a con- 
vention room which will accommodate 
large numbers of convention visitors as 
well as an addition of forty bedrooms 
and baths. 

All rooms have telephone service and 
are modern in every detail. Each season 
the hotel is completely gone over from 
stem to stern and repainted and redec- 
orated. 

The Harrisons personally supervise 
the hotel and are on deck at all times 
to see that their guests are comfortable. 

The food at Harrison Hall is superb. 
Here guests find real "sho-nuf" Eastern 
Shore cookery at its best. A vacation 
at this resort hotel is one long to be 
remembered. 

* * * 

The LANKFORD HOTEL, owned 
and operated by Miss Mary B. Quillen, 
is one of Ocean City's older hotels. 
Miss Quillen has been the genial hostess 
at the hotel since its organization many 



r 




— 



BLACKIE 



1217- 22nd STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



TRAOC M«KK 



5, 




'cnoTieid v_ompanu inc. 

iDierlina iDiwerware 

Carles al Pleasanl Sis Tialllmore-I.Md 




Good-bye Campus — Hello EUROPE! 

The greatest Summer Vacation — see the old world, its culture and 
charm, its cities packed with history and architecture, and its 
wonderful opportunities for having FUN. (If you took French, 
try it out — but the Tour Escort handles everything, sees you get 
to the places you yearn to visit.) 

Brownell College Tours and Popular Tours 

College Tours for ages 18 to 30. Popular Tours have no age limits 
yet many students go along. Choice hotels, 3 meals a day. Frequent 
departures by Sea and by Air. 45 to 66 days. From about $1200, 
inclusive. _ . _ , . . 

Expansive Travel — Inexpensive 

Passion Play at Oberammergau (tickets included), Holland, Bel- 
gium, England, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Austria, and France. 
Many tours include Scandanavia, some take in Spain, a few to 
Greece, some to Olympic Games. 

l4Jo*M Wide. *J>unMil gesiaice, Go^i. 

MERCURY BUILDING, 20th & K Sts. N.W. 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. Phone: FEderal 3-9373 



May-June, 1960 



49 



"> 



Juimiurc 
fatcrior 'Decorating 

Furntihtny and Decorating Maryland 

Homes and ln$lilutions for 

over 64 yt-<ifi 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU 5-4510 Baltimore, Md 



# 



oa. 



Maty/and It/osHen 



j 



c^kmA^ 



LJuali/ij anil 



FINE FOOD &. DRINKS 

Vint Our Internationally famous Wine Cellar 

FIFTH AVE. & BRENTWOOD 

DUNDALK, MD. 

2 New Dining Rooms added to serve our 

patrons better. 

Private Banquet facilities to accommodate 

10 to 125 guests. 

For Reservations Call 

ATwater 5-0520 • ATwater 4-9854 




/ears ago. Guests return to the Lank- 
ford year alter year tor their summer 
holiday. 

* * * 

While all ot us await our holidays 
awaj I roin work and the everyday rou- 
tine of our lises. we never forget the 
comforts of our homes where we can 
express ourscUes in our own domain. 

The C. J. BENSON and COMPANY. 

Inc. furniture store ol 501 North 
Charles Street. Baltimore. Maryland, is 
the store where one can find an elegant 
selection of furniture to express one's 
personalities to perfection. 

The firm is in its 64th year of serving 
Marylanders and has one of the finest 
selections of furniture to choose from. 
They have more than 20,000 square 
feet of display area featuring traditional 
and contemporary furniture. 



THE Travel Every 

METROPOLITAN 
TOURIST COMPANY 

1115 N. Charles Street — Baltimore 1, Maryland 



where — 

By Steamer ... by Airline ... by Rail 

Independent and Conducted Tours 

Cruises . . . Resorts . . . Hotels 

Personalized Travel Service Since 1923 

• LExington 9-7300 



oA <Well Pressed £Man HiDears a SKat 

SOUTHCOMB 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 

Stetson Ties 




109 E. BALTIMORE STREET 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



LExington 9-5799 



I here are decorative accessories of 
lamps, mirrors, rugs, bric-a-brac, drap- 
eries and upholster\ materials to satis- 
fy the most exacting customer. The firm 
operates its own workrooms for drap- 
eries, upholstery, slip covers as well as 
custom made upholstered furniture. 

( . J. Benson k Company, Inc.. is a 
member of the Grand Rapids Furniture 
Makers Cuild. which gi\es its members 
access to the products of the manufac- 
turers of the finest furniture. They are 
Maryland's exclusive dealers in Stickley 
Early American Furniture, which is 
recognized as one of the best furniture 
manufacturers. 

Where C. J. Benson & Company sells 
the finest of furniture, they also have 
an extremely wide range of lower price 
furniture. A customer can purchase a 
lamp from $10.00 to $125.00; a com- 
plete dining room or bedroom suite 
from $375.00 to $3,000.00. Some of 
the fine lines carried by Benson's are 
Dre.xel. Heritage, Henredon. Hekman. 
Fine Arts. Morganton. Kindel. Kling. 
Stickles. Imperial. Kittinger. Bro\holl. 
Molla. Salterini. Schoonbeck. Hickory, 
Townshend, Holland. Johnson. Pine 
Shops. Sligh. Low r\. Maddox, Norris, 
Craltique, Davis, Hampton. Old Col- 
ony Style, and Statton. 

One service that the firm excels in is 
free decorative suggestions in conjunc- 
tion with purchases. Their interior dec- 
orators will help customers place furni- 
ture properly in a room and suggest the 
right accessories for that room. 

Benson provides ample free parking 
in three convenient lots all within one- 
half block from the store. Budget ac- 
counts are available and are tailored 
to the customer's individual needs. Visit 
this fine store. You'll be happy you did. 



4> 



"Washington's Best Restaurant" 

Holiday Magazine ( -Hh GcOMCMtMrc Year I 

"One of America's Ten Best" 

Kalion.il Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

Where Statesmen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 



4> 



Open Daily * Sunday 11:30 «M -1:00 A.M. 
Telephone Dl. 7-6467 

Five Beautifully Appointed Rooms Caterinq To Parties, Meetings And Banquets Accommodatinq 10 To 250 Persons. 

Established For Over 100 Years 



50 



the Maryland Magazine 



Nursing 

[Continued from page 47) 



land Nurses' Association and the De- 
partment o\ Public Health Nursing ol 
the Maryland State Health Department. 
iiu- second course, "Supervision in 

Nursing." will be held from September 
12 to September 23 and is intended for 
nurses who hold supervisory positions 
in hospitals or wish to prepare them- 
selves for such positions, it will be 
conducted by Helen (.;. Graves, Direc- 
tor of Nursing Service at Emorj Uni- 
versity Hospital. Atlanta, in coopera- 
tion with two stall members of Uni- 
versity Hospital in Baltimore — Aurelia 
( Willers, Director of Nursing Service, 
and Mary R. Northrup. Assistant Direc- 
tor in charge of pediatric nursing. 

"Nursing in Tuberculosis," the third 
course, will be offered November 21- 
December 2. under the direction of Vir- 
ginia Conley, Associate Professor in 
Nursing, and Frances P. Koonz, spe- 
cialist in tuberculosis nursing in the 
School of Nursing and also at City 
Hospitals. 

Each course carries two semester 
hours of college credit and may be 
taken either with or without credit. 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Leslie C. Costello 



School News 

Dr. Francis M. Miller, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, has returned to 
the School of Pharmacy after having 
spent one year in Germany on sabbat- 
ical leave from the University. 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, Associate 
Professor of Chemistry, along with his 
wife and five children, visited the 
parents of Mrs. Doorenbos in Hawaii 
for six weeks during the summer. 

Dr. W. Arthur Purdum, Professor of 
Hospital Pharmacy since 1947. has 
been named Vice President in charge of 
Production and Development of Bur- 
roughs Brothers Manufacturing Com- 
pany. He takes up his new duties im- 
mediately. Dr. Purdum is a graduate of 
the School of Pharmacy, receiving his 
Ph.D. in 1941. He has been Chief 
Pharmacist at the Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital for fourteen years and has numer- 
ous publications. 

The School of Pharmacy commenced 
its fall term with an Orientation Pro- 
gram for freshmen on September 14. 
This program included addresses by 
Victor H. Morgenroth. Jr., President of 
(Continued on next page) 



CATERING 



■-W illi \ 



\l Touch 



COCKTAIL PARTIES 



OPEN HOUSE 



Party Perk ups for Any Occasion or 
Fully Serviced Affairs 

RECEPTIONS 



BUFFETS 



TEAS 



PICNICS 



LUNCHEONS 



BANQUETS 




the Qcuiuai Gat&U+t<j, service 

7651 Old Georgetown Road BETHESDA, MD. 

OLiver 6-1533-4 



KENMAR 
STEEL 

CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 



structural steel erection 
setting reinforcing steel 

i 2041 K St., N.W. 
-/ Washington, D. C. 
\ FEderal 3-3290 



Competent experienced surgical fitters in attendance 
Equipment and Supplies for the 




1 Til 111 




HOSPITAL 

LABORATORY 

INDUSTRY 



PHYSICIAN 

SURGEON 

NURSE 



M URHAV BXUMGARTh 







^/ II Lurray,= oOa umgariner 



urraij 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENT CO.. IXC. 

1421 MARYLAND AVENUE • BALTIMORE 1. MD. 



Serving the medical profession 
for over a third of a century 

SARATOGA 7-7333 

Parking Facilities Available 



TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

5135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md. 



May-June, 1960 



51 



THE 

NATIONAL BANK 
OF CAMBRIDGE 

Complete 
Banking Service 

Organized 1880 

S W-7.7T DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

Cambridge, Maryland 



E. S. I0KIN5 i 


•• LI 

everything 
needed 
for 
building •• 


Phone PI 9-3171 
Salisbury, Md. 



CITIZENS 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

M< mber Fcdi ral Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 

A Federal Reserve Bank 

POCOMOKE CITY 
MARYLAND 



The COHN & BOCK CO. 

Lumber • Building Material 

poultry FEEDS livestock 

PRINCESS ANNE, MARYLAND 



SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 

IT'S DELWIOl - 

SALISBURY. MARYLAND 



the School ol Ph.irm.ic> Alumni Asso- 
ciation Francis S Balassone, Secretary 
ol the Maryland Board ol Pharmacy 
ind Chief, Division ol Drug Control; 
Joseph Cohen, Executive Secretary ol 
the Maryland Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion and Baltimore Metropolitan Phar- 
maceutical Association: Gordon A. 
Mon.it. President Ol the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association; and Herbert 
Drukman, President ol the Baltimore 
Metropolitan Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 

The freshman class included the larg- 
est enrollment lor several years, a total 
of 78 students of which 12 were girls. 
I he total enrollment tor the 1959-60 
scholastic sear is 230. with 44 seniors. 
In addition, there were 23 enrolled in 
the Graduate School. 



Ai l mm News 

Joseph Cohen. Ph.G. 1929. Executive 
Secretary of the Maryland Pharmaceu- 
tical Association and Baltimore Metro- 
politan Pharmaceutical Association. 
was re-elected to the Executive Com- 
mittee of the National Conference of 
State Association Secretaries at a meet- 
ing in Cincinnati in August. He was 
also elected Vice President of the 
Metropolitan Drug Association Secre- 
taries at a meeting in St. Louis in Sep- 
tember. More recently, he was elected 
Chairman of the Drug Manufacturers 
Relations Committee at St. Louis, repre- 
senting both State and Metropolitan 
Drug Association Secretaries. 

Henry Seidman. Ph.G. 1929, received 
the Meritorious Award for 1959 of the 
Alpha Zeta Omega Pharmaceutical Fra- 
ternity at their national convention in 
Miami. Florida, this past summer. 

Paul A. Pumpian, Secretary of the 
Wisconsin Board of Pharmacy, has 
been appointed Midwestern States Re- 
gional Chairman of the Greater Uni- 
versity Fund. Pumpian. a graduate of 
the School of Pharmacy and the School 
of Law, served as Assistant Professor 
and Chairman of the Department of 
Pharmacy Administration at the Lni- 
versity's School of Pharmacy and Lec- 
turer in Dental Jurisprudence at the 
University's School of Dentistry. As re- 
gional chairman, he will be responsible 
for the organization of committees to 
solicit funds from the University's 1 100 
alumni in 1 I of the midwestern states. 

Elmer W. Nollau. B.S. 1942. has 
recently resigned as Director oi Phar- 
maceutical Services at the Memorial 
Medical Center. Miners Memorial Hos- 
pital Association, in Williamson. West 
Virginia, to accept a position as Assist- 
ant Chief Pharmacist at the Universitj 
of Chicago Clinics. 

Dr. Marvin J. Cheitkoff, Manager of 
the technical unit oi the Quality Con- 
trol Area ol Merck Sharp & Dohme. 



SHORE 

Distributors, Inc. 

• wholesale plumbing 

• and heating supplies 

Salisbury, Md. 

• PHONE PI 9-3121 

tLaston, Md. 

• PHONE TA 2-2810 

M ilford, Del. 

• PHONE 8922 

Dover, Del. 

• PHONE 7453 

Onley, Va. 

• PHONE SU 7-2415 

Shov: Room at all Loca* 




J. 1. WELLS 
CO., INC. 

C R E O S O T E D 
PRODUCTS 

— Telephones — 

PI 2-2144— PI 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



Jiff 



J^>prinq 
PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE PI 9-5594 



52 



the Mary i \\d Magazim 



Division oi Merck & Co., Inc.. has been 

assigned tO the Marketing Section lor 

an indefinite period. Dr. Chertkoff 
earned the B.S. in Pharmacj at the 
University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy in 1951, and the Master of 
Science in pharmaceutical chcmisti\ in 
January, 1954. He was subsequently 
awarded the Ph.D. degree at Purdue 
University. 



Alumni Association 
School of PHARMACY 

University of Maryland 

B. Olive Cole. Chairman 
Publications Committee 



Anm \i Vai entine Dance 

The annual entertainment and Valen- 
tine Dance of the Alumni Association 
of the School of Pharmacy afforded an 
enjoyable evening for more than four 
hundred persons who attended the affair 
in the ballroom of the Emerson Hotel, 
Baltimore, on Thursday evening, Feb- 
ruary 11, 1960. 

Those in attendance included stu- 
dents and their ladies or escorts, 
faculty members, graduate students, 
invited guests and members of the 
Alumni Association and their wives. 
Dr. and Mrs. William S. Apple, Exec- 
utive Secretary of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association; Mr. and Mrs. 
D. W. Bien, President of the Alumni 
Club of Baltimore of the University 
of Maryland; David L. Brigham, Direc- 
tor of Alumni Relations of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, and Mrs. Andrew G. 
DuMez were special guests on that 
evening. 

Mr. Irving Cohen, Vice-President 
and General Chairman of the commit- 
tees, welcomed the group in attendance. 
President Victor H. Morgenroth, Jr., 
expressed his appreciation of the large 
number in attendance and the work of 
the different committees. Dr. Apple 
brought greetings from the American 
Pharmaceutical Association, and Dean 
Noel E. Foss spoke for the faculty of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

An unusual entertainment was pre- 
sented by Mr. Nagindas K. Patel, with 
Indian drums, an Instructor in Phar- 
macy in the School of Pharmacy, and 
Mrs. Shakintala Vyas, soloist, Secretary 
to the Educational Attache, Embassy 
of India, in Washington, D. C. Mr. 
Pramod Vyas, husband of Mrs. Vyas, 
announced and explained the numbers 
rendered by Mrs. Vyas and Mr. Patel. 

The Sappfield Girls — Mrs. Nancy 
Sappe and Carolyn Warfield, students 

{Continued on next page) 






MASON CANNING COMPANY, INC. 



POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



C. 0. OLIPHANT & SON, INC. 



ESTABLISHED 1921 



ROOFING and SHEET METAL CONTRACTORS 



Heating • Ventilating • Air Conditioning 



'BARRETT" 



Telephone: TR 5-7581 



BONDED ROOFERS 



LAUREL, DELAWARE 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



CARL J. WILLIAMS & SONS 

CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 
918 Cooper St. • Salisbury, Maryland • PI 9-5444 



MARYLAND-VIRGINIA REALTY CO., INC. 



Talbot County Waterfronts 



123 N. Washington St. 
EASTON, MD. 



Phone: 
TA 2-1900 



Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

Dependable Service Since 1893 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

Member Federal Deposit Ins. Corp. 



May-June, 1960 



53 




NEW 76 PROFESSIONAL 

Pivot Power Steering 

CUTS 15-20 ACRES A DAY 

I Mower for Ever] \<W: 

REELS - ROT Am S 

Complete Turf and Garden 

Equipment 

BALTIMORE TORO CO. 

Distributor 

2205 JOPPA ROAD 

BALTIMORE 14, MD. 

Phone NO. 8-0500 

Sales and Service 



VISIT 

Bernie Lee's 

PENN HOTEL 

( Newly renovated) 

OPEN DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 a.m. 
serving 

BREAKFAST 

LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

5 — Spacious Banquet Rooms 
Call VA 3-0300 for reservation 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
PACKAGE GOODS 

15 W. Penn. Avenue 
TOWSON, MARYLAND 

FREE PARKING 



HOSPITAL 
EQUIPMENT 

THE 

COLSON-MERRIAM 
COMPANY 

MUlberry 5-2847 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



at the School ol Pharmacv presented 
a humorous skit I he orchestra ol St. hi 
Bridges provided music tor the dance. 
rhe souvenir program was ol special 
interest, as it represented not onlj man;, 
hours oi work ol the members ol the 
Program ( ommittee, bul also several 
thousand dollars for carrying on the 

work oi the Association, this monev m- 

cluding donations from manufacturers, 
wholesalers, retailers, associated organ- 
izations, patrons, members ol the 
Alumni and their friends. A portion 
oi the monej will be used tor student 
aid and scholarships tor first-year stu- 
dents in the School ol Pharmacy, in- 
cluding tuition and hooks tor a year. 

James l\ ( ragg. Jr.. and Milton A. 
I riedman were chairman and co-chair- 
man ot the Program Committee. Alex- 
ander Mayer ami Solomon Wiener were 
chairman and co-chairman ot the 
I icket ( ommittee and secured a large 
ami appreciative audience. Robert J. 
Kokoski was chairman ol the Enter- 
tainment Committee. Samuel A. ( iold- 
stein was chairman of Place and Ar- 
rangements (ommittee and supervised 
the serving of ice cream and cake 
through the courtesy of the Meadow- 
gold Ice (ream Company. 

Prizes provided by the H. B. Ciilpin 
Company, S. F. Whitman and Sons. I. 
& L. Company and the Owens Illinois 
(dass Company were distributed to 
those holding the lucky numbers. Mr. 
Albert Heydemann of the Gilt Edge 
Photo Service, Inc. provided photo- 
graphs of the party. 

This enjoyable affair has the coop- 
eration of the selected committees, the 
members of the Association and also 
of many allied groups associated with 
pharmacy, with Dr. Frank J. Slama. 
Executive Secretary of the Association, 
as a watchful coordinator. 

The annual business meeting of the 
Association was scheduled for May 15. 
I960 in the Kelly Memorial Building. 
and the annual banquet honoring the 
graduating class and a number of class 
reunions, for June 2, I960. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College of Special and 
Continuation Studies) 

G. Allen Sager 



Totten Visits Campt s 

Dr. Don F. Totten. Assistant Director 
o\ the European Division ol the Over- 
seas Program, visited the College Park 
campus during the last week oi Febru- 
ary. He conferred with Deans and De- 
partment Heads .md I niversitv College 




Circle 20170 Circle 20171 


ARISTOCRAT 


LINEN SUPPLY CO., INC. 


3612 WASHINGTON BOULEVARD 


BALTIMORE 27, MARYLAND 


A Complete Linen Rental Service 


for all commercial establishments 


COATS 


APRONS 


UNIFORMS 


TOWELS 


TABLE LINEN 


WHY BUY? — WE SUPPLY! 



BALTIMORE'E MOST 

COMPLETE and EXCLUSIVE 

Black Tie Center 

g*^\& ♦ 

formal near 

RENTED — SOLD 

6218 REISTERSTOWN RD. 

Baltimore, Md. 
FLeetwood 8-1142 



54 



mi Marviand Magazine 



officials concerning staffing and other 
instructorial problems. 

In charge ol the Maryland Program 

in France. Spain and Morocco, Dr. 
Totten i*> responsible for the scheduling 

ot courses, the assignment Ol teachers, 
and other numerous administrative 

matters. Student enrollment in these 
three areas is more than 1,600 per 
term. 

A Ph.D. from the University of 
Heidelberg (1955) in Geography, Poli- 
tical Philosophy, Geology, Dr. Tbtten's 

dissertation was recently published by 
a German firm (see the February, I960, 
Marylander) , 



Phi Kappa Phi Initiates 
Six University College Students 

Among the sixty students initiated into 
the University of Maryland chapter of 
Phi Kappa Phi. national honorary 
scholastic fraternity, on January 16, 
1960, were six from University College. 

They were: L Col. Edwin Arnold, 
L/Col. Frank Fischer, Capt. William 
Phillips, Capt. Robert Rambicur, Maj. 
Robert Rensema, and CWO Harry 
Roberts. 



Bootstrap Ball 

The 1959 Fall semester campus boot- 
strap students held an inter-service 
"Bootstrap Ball" in mid-January. Over 
150 students, wives, friends, and guests 
attended. The party was held at the 
Officers Mess, Naval Weapons Plant, 
in Washington, D. C. 



Two Receive Commendation Ribbon 

Two graduates are recent recipients of 
the Army Commendation Ribbon with 
Metal Pendant. 

Lt. Colonel Thomas Laughlin, Jr., 
'56, who is presently stationed at Fort 
Benning, Georgia, received the award 
for meritorious service during his last 
assignment in Japan. Col. Laughlin 
was cited for his "constant initiative, 
keen judgment and exceptional admin- 
istrative ability" as executive officer. 

Major Roy L. Wood, '57, received 
the award for meritorious service in 
Korea. Major Wood was Policy Ad- 
visor to three senior members and two 
secretaries of the United Nations Com- 
mand Component of the Military 
Armistice Commission. He was cited 
by Headquarters, United Nations Com- 
mand in Seoul, Korea, for demonstrat- 
ing outstanding ability in discharging 
his duties. 

{Continued on next page) 



J. H. De VEAU & SON, Inc. 



General Contractors 



ROADS 

DRIVEWAYS 

PIPE 



EXCAVATION 

BUILDINGS 

CONCRETE 



CONCRETE SAWS 



4100 Jones Bridge Road 



North Chevy Chase, Md. 



Washington's Spare Bedroom For Your Guests 



Motor 



»•'». 




Open 24 Hrs. A Day 

Swimming Pool 

Phones & Free TV In Each Room 

Suites, Lounges & Conference Room 

Wall To Wall Carpeting 

On Silver Spilna 

76 ROOMS ^^.^ '^^ 95 ROOMS & RESTAURANT 

Cor. 13th St. & Eastern Av. Cor. Wise. Av. & Bradley Blvd. 
JUniper 8-5801 OLiver 4-1400 

TELETYPE # SILVER SPRING MD., 314 



TOWN 

utoteh 

• Tub & Shower In Each Room 

• Individually Controlled 
Heating & Air Conditioning 

• Free Washer & Dryer 

• Sightseeing Tours 

On Jjetnesaa 




BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"Become Quality, Gcmiciaad." 

PLANT: 621-27 G STREET, N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



NORTH 
WASHINGTON PRESS 

Inc. 

We Specialize in Printing 
for Churches and Schools 

5644 3rd Street, N.E. 

WASHINGTON 11, D. C. 

LAwrence 6-8626 



G.B.MACKEC0RP. 

Serving Maryland University 
with all types of 
Vending Machines 



May-June, 1960 



55 






\uimt s ann um associatiom J 

FEEDS 
SEEDS 

FERTILIZER 
LIMESTONE 
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



FREDERICK 



Feed 



MO 3-3113 



I Petroleum MO 3-5422 
THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 



Buy Defense Bonds 
Every Payday 

J. H. F. 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 
A Maryland Institution 



MARYLAND'S FINEST FOOD 

The Coffee Room 
Anne Key's Kitchen 

^•Francis ScottKey^ ^ 

FREDERICK 



WHOLESALE 


STATIONERY 


The 


"Handy" 

Baltimore, Md. 


Line 



\\ ii ii mi Si RVH i Ai i mm 

It. Colonel Melvio M Burnett. "56, 
ism. h.is been assigned to the Air 
Force Ballistic Missile Division as Chief, 
radical Data Division ol the Office ol 
Administrative Services. 

( aptain ( .<rl W. Sachs, '59, has been 
stationed in Boblingen, Germany, and 
is now a member of the Army's 2 c >th 
I ransportatiorj Battalion. 

Major Keith E. Hanssen. "5 l J. recent- 
Iv completed the 22-week medical ser- 
vice officer advanced course at Brooke 
Army Medical (enter. Fort Sam Hous- 
ton. Ie\as. 



Vssistani DEAN Honored 

Brig. Gen. T. Dodson Stamps. USA. 
Ret, Lniversitv College Assistant Dean 
lor Military Studies, has been credited 
with launching a project which resulted 
in the publication of a West Point 
Atlas of American Wars. 

The highly prized Atlas, used for 
several years at the United States Mili- 
tary Academy as a textbook, was re- 
cently released to the public for the 
first time with the publication of the 
two-volume work by a New York firm. 

The first comprehensive American 
history of its kind, the Atlas was com- 
piled by the Academy's military art 
and engineering department whose 
chief. Col. Vincent J. Esposito, was 
the principal editor. 

In his introduction. Col. Esposito 
credits Gen. Stamps, former head of 
the same department, with launching 
the project around 1940. 

Since coming to the University of 
Maryland. Gen. Stamps has developed 
a two-semester sequence of courses in 
U. S. Military History which are now 
required in the Bachelor of Science in 
Military Studies curriculum. The Atlas 
of American Wars figured prominentlv 
in that revision and is being made 
available as collateral reading. 



University College Featured on TV 

The University of Maryland Overseas 
Program was recently featured on a 
half hour TV program called "Pass- 
port.*' The program originated from 
station WMAR-TV in Baltimore. 

Maryland's Governor. The Honorable 
J. Millard Tawes. University President 
Wilson H. Elkins. and University Col- 
lege Dean Ray Ehrensberger. all of 
whom have traveled overseas visiting 
the Overseas Program, took part in the 
discussion. Mrs. Elsie Kemper was the 
program moderator. 

Miss Pat Ohl. Homecoming Eootball 
Queen last fall, and former student in 
the Munich Branch of the Overseas 
Program, also appeared on the program. 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

• Established 7859 • 

Crushed Stone - Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 




Genera/ Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 

Main Office — Monument 3-3104 

Frederick, Md. Plant 

Monument 2-1 1 81 



Congratulations 

/o the 
Graduates of the 

UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 

• 

Class of 1960 



R & H 



L. 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 
Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK, MD. 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

Every kind of Insurance 

110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



>6 



thi; Maryi and Magazine 



\i i \i\l Oppicia] Promoi I D 

I i Col. Kennard S. Vandergrift be- 
came director ol Port Operations, 
Bremerhaven Port of Embarkation, Last 
November. Col. Vandergrift is a p.ist 
president of the European chapter ol 
the University oi Maryland Alumni 
Association. 

Col. Vandergrift graduated from the 
University of Maryland in 1955 with a 
bachelor of science degree in Military 
Studies. Smee l l )57. he has been serving 
as Chief of Procurement at the Bremer- 
haven Port. 



Firsi Goosi Cik \di \ 1 1 

Mr. James L. Catt, an OS1 Special 
Agent, was awarded the Bachelor of 
Arts Degree in General Studies in Jan- 
uary ceremonies at Goose Air Base, 
Goose Bay, Labrador. He was the first 
graduate in the history of the Maryland 
Program at Goose Bay. 

Starting with Term II of the 1957-58 
school year, Mr. Catt completed a 
total of 54 semester hours of work with 
the University of Maryland, all at 
Goose Bay. His primary concentration 
was in the field of Government and 
Politics and his secondary was in Busi- 
ness Administration and Economics. 

Mr. Catt has been named to the 
Dean's List, and he has an overall 3.3 
average for all of his work taken with 
the University of Maryland. He has 
also studied at the University of Mis- 
sissippi, the Ohio State University, and 
Bethel College, McKenzie, Texas. 

The degree was conferred on Mr. 
Catt in ceremonies following a banquet 
at the Goose Air Base Officers Club. 
Dean Ray Ehrensberger, of University 
College, conferred the degree and Mr. 
George J. Dillavou, Director of the 
Atlantic Division, presented the candi- 
date. Colonel Robert W. Strong, Jr., 
Wing Commander, welcomed the grad- 
uate and the Maryland officials who had 
flown from College Park to be present 
for the occasion and commended the 
education program at Goose. 

Colonel Strong presented Mr. Catt 
with the plaque for being the first to 
complete all of his college degree re- 
quirements while stationed at Goose. 

The Maryland Program at Goose is 
the largest in the Atlantic Division this 
year. 150-200 students are enrolled in 
10 to 12 classes each term. 

The Goose Air Base Education Pro- 
gram is administered by Lt. Bill Rob- 
ertson, the Education Officer, Miss 
Jeanette Fierek, Director of Education, 
and Miss Frankie Gabinette, who is 
Miss Fierek's assistant. 

(Continued on next page) 




for Embassy 
for Excellence 



Now, More Than Ever Before 

EMBASSY DAIRY Products Are Distinguished 

By Quality, Purity, Superior "Goodness" 

and Embassy Dairy Service Unsurpassed By 

Any Other — Call Now for Delivery of 

EMBASSY DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Washington, D. C. DUpont 7-1441 



McLeod &l Romborg 

Stone Co,, Inc. 

— •— 

CUT STONE 

— •— 
Bladensburg, Maryland 











WALLOP 


and 


SON 






J. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 


j. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, 


3rd 








Class 


of 191? 




Class of 1942 












— INSURANCE- 












Fire 


- Automobile - Life ■ 


Accident - 


Liability - Bonds 












EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 




1101 


VERMONT 


AVE., 


N.W.— Suite 405 


Executive 3- 


1400 WASHINGTON 5. D. C. 



Thomas E, Claris Inc* 

PUunbina and ^teatina S&utice. 

AA2A Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 
WOodley 6-71 22 Day or Night, WOodley 6-5181 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

Link Belt Company "Pyrene" & "MSA" Industrial 

Power Transmission • C-0-TW0 • Gas Masks. Canisters 

Supplies Fire Extinguishers & First Aid Equipment 



2600 12th STREET, N.E. 



WASHINGTON 18, D. C. 



LAwrence 6-1362 



May-June, 1960 



57 



N.Litterio 
& Company, Inc. 




MASONRY 
CONTRACTORS 



3860 South Four Mile Run Drive 



JA 7-5313 



Arlington, Virginia 



I)k HORNBAKl 

loi ks OVI Ksi \s ( kMPUS 

I)r K Lee Hornbake. Dean ol the 
I acuity, spent the month of October on 
.hi extended visit to the European Divi- 
sion ol the Maryland Overseas Pro- 
gram. It was his first visit to the Euro- 
pean Division. 

Extensive conferences were held with 
the Director ol the European Division, 
Brigadier General Herman Beukema, 
U. S. Artm Retired, and the staff of 
the Heidelberg office. Dean Hornbake 
also \isited the Munich Branch, meet- 
ing with the staff and faculty, and the 
United Kingdom Branch in I-ondon. 

In addition to the conferences with 
Universit) officials, Dean Hornbake 
\isited more than 30 military education 
centers in Germany, France, and the 
United Kingdom, observing Maryland 
classes and talking with education ad- 
visers, faculty members, and students. 
Dean Ray Ehrensberger of University 
College accompanied Dean Hornbake 
during some of his tour. 

The tour was made in the interest of 
verifying academic standards through- 
out the worldwide campus of the Uni- 
versity. As Dean of the Faculty, Dr. 
Hornbake is responsible for coordinat- 
ing faculty and administration efforts in 
matters pertaining to curriculum and 
instruction. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 

Herbert R. O'Conor 

Herbert R. O'Conor. Law 10, died 
March 4 following a cerebral hemor- 
rhage. 

Mr. O'Conor was the only Maryland 
citizen to have served as Attorney Gen- 
eral. Governor and U. S. Senator for 
the State. He was elected Governor of 
Man land in 1938 and re-elected in 
1942. His term as United States Sen- 
ator began in 1946. 

Mr. O'Conor had retired to private 
law practice in 1952. 

Dr. George A. Bunting 

Dr. George A. Bunting. Pharm. '99. 
died recently following a heart attack. 
Dr. Bunting is best known for his 
development of the greaseless cream. 
Noxzema. He developed this special 
product in 1^14 after considerable ex- 
perimentation. At the time he was the 
owner of a Baltimore drugstore, and he 
subsequently established the headquar- 
ters of the Noxzema Chemical Co. in 



Why 




is 



mPRVLUnD 5 FIIIEST CORD 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is, 
pulled from the 
stalk. 




GOLDEN 



SWEET 



— Packed by — 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

PERRYMAN. MO. - KENNEDYVILLE. MD. 
Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen, 621 - J 



First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 







THE 
TOWN 
HOUSE 

"Famous for Food In 
the Maryland Tradition" 

Open Daily 

LUNCHEON, COCKTAILS, 
DINNER 

Howard at 27th HO 7-5191 
Baltimore. Md. 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



58 



the Maryland Magazine 



Baltimore. The enterprise has since 
developed into .1 $16.5 million-a-yeai 
business. 

The name ol the product was coined 
bj a customer who told Dr. Bunting 

that the cream "sure knocks ec/ema." 

Dr. Bunting stepped down from the 

presidency of the compam in l l )4 l ). in 

favor of his son. cicorgc Lloyd Bunting, 

but continued as hoard chairman until 
his death. 

A liberal contributor to Washington 
College, he provided funds to build a 
library there and established a perma- 
nent endow ment tor students from 
Worcester County planning to enter 
Washington. 

Dr. Bunting is survived by his son, 
a daughter, three grandchildren and his 
wife. Mrs. Nellie Bowen Bunting, whom 
he married in 1901. 



Dr. Bertrand A. Chapman 

Dr. Bertrand A. Chapman, Med. '95, 
died suddenly at his home in Spring- 
field, Vermont, recently. At age 91, Dr. 
Chapman was the oldest practicing phy- 
sician in the state. He was the last 
surviving member of the original med- 
ical staff of the hospital in Springfield. 
the hospital which he conceived and 
lived to see grow into one of the most 
modern institutions of its size in the 
state. 



Other Deaths 

Harry F. Schneider, Law '18, died fol- 
lowing a brief illness on November 4, 
1959. He is survived by his wife, two 
daughters and three grandchildren. 

Alexander Gordon, Law '00. died at 
his home recently, after returning from 
a walk. He was 82 years old. 

Dr. Amos F. Hutchins, a former 
teacher at the University of Maryland 
Medical School, died of pneumonia re- 
cently. Dr. Hutchins, who was 75 years 
old, had been ill for some time. 

Dr. William C. Killinger, D.D.S., 
died recently at Sibley Hospital in 
Washington, D. C. Dr. Killinger had 
practiced dentistry in the District for 
more than 50 years and was the first 
dental inspector of the public schools 
there. 

Thomas Clay, Sr., Ag. '21, died early 
this year. 

George C. Walker, a graduate of 
the Maryland Agricultural College and 
retired real estate man of Prince 
Georges County, died at his home in 
Hyattsville recently. 

C. Howard Brown, Mayor of Blad- 
ensburg and longtime town postmaster, 
died recently following a heart attack. 

Dr. Roy S. Dearstyne, Ag. '17, for- 
mer Head of the Department of Poul- 
try Science at North Carolina State 
College, died after a long illness. 



J. E. GREINER CO 



CONSULTING 



ENGINEERS 



1106 NORTH CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 



DIRECT FACTORY 
AGENTS FOR 

M. G. 

AUSTIN 

HEALEY 

MAGNETTE 

MORRIS 

HILLMAN 

SUNBEAM 

ALPINE 

DAIMLER 

TRIUMPH 

SPRITE 

JAGUAR 

ALFA-ROMEO 

PORSCHE 



SALES A 



RVICE 




lgn Motors, Ctd. 



1001 CATHEDRALTT BALTIMORE, MD. 

LExington 9-1559 



Since 1935 



ROADS BY 
DRUMMOND & COMPANY, Inc. 



Phone: Circle 2-3030 



Race Road, Baltimore 27, Md. 



pests: 



"Call 7Ae 



TERMITES? 



Rod* Ma*t* 




T CONTROL SINCE l8D 



C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 
SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



IOTEL JcPPLY O 

EST Purveyors of Fine 19 27 

MEATS - POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotels. 

Institutions. Shins. 

Clubs. Etc. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 

BALTIMORE. MD. 



May-June, 1960 



59 







Directory of Advertisers 








' 




n ( 'j 




Palmer Ford, Inc. 


28 






A Loai .'•. 




Park I 


38 










1 Equipment 1 i 


40 






PuH< 




. 












Building .'■ 










42 


k 1 












Jinin. 








J f 


59 




30 




M I Grove Lira 




■ 


36 


















1 If. A. lam-. 


56 








48 


.'. 








ing« & Loan As- 




H tel 


43 










Inc. 


41 




34 






Hall Hotel 

nit 


4' 

28 


Riall 










58 


!■ 








Milkr. 












in the Pines 








■ 




. 
















y Trailways 


tnj 




hi 




' 


53 










S KC 




1 01 




- 1 
Frank B. Jones, Optician 


41 


Schl<: -die Companj 




rniture Company 










■ 


44 


' - Co. 




Kenmar Si 




The Shade Shop 








- 




■ 








Kidwell X- Kidwell, Inc. 




chaffer. Inc. 


43 


pan; 














41 


The E. 11 Koester Bakery < 
Krispy Krrme Doughnut Company 




urant 


41 


Hill Sand & <.. 


1 impany 


Company 








S nig Building Supply l 




■ 




Lamb Seal & Stencil Co.. Inc. 




Russell W. Smith. Insurance 








J. I.angrall & Bro.. Inc. 


- 


Smir 








Lankford Hotel 


46 


■ comb. Inc. 




■ pan] 




Ledo Restaurant 


39 


• rn Plate Class Companj 




'oil & Son 


54 


Company 


. 


Hill Sanitarium 




The i Service 


51 


N. Litterio & Co., Inc. 


58 






I> Harry Chambers, Opticians 


29 


A Little Bit of Norwav in Marvland 


48 


- (Bookbinder I 




- Garage 


41 


Space Division 




■ :. 


31 


il Bank 




Inside Front f 


'It^-c 




Thon 


5 7 


Lord Calvert Hotel 


44 


Stuti' nt's S Store 




rland Farms Dairv 


.4 
27 


Chevrolet 


^ 


Trust Company 
Mano Swartz 




Bottling Co. of Silver Spring 


lock Company 


5j 


( i B. Macke Corp. 




t'neart Bakcr~ 




' rriam Company 




Maria's Restaurant 


26 






Elizabeth Cooney Personnel Agencv 


31 


Marvland Hotel Supply Companv 


59 


Thomas & Th mpany 




Co-operative Dental Laboratories 


33 


Maryland-Virginia Realty Company 




Thompson Furniture Company 




A ' ' < ■ 11. Inc. 


45 
56 


Mason Canning Company 
Clifton D. Mavhew. Inc. 


44 


Thon.-- Si ' 
Hall Tavern 


41 


Crow Oil -\ Wax Company 






• i: City Council of Ocean City 


46 


The ] 


58 






Metropolitan Tourist Company 


50 


rowson Practical Nursing Agency 








F. O. Mitchell & Bro.. Inc. 








m Wear 




Modern Machinist Company 


41 


Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Ass- 




Davidson rransfei \ M..rage Co... 


3 ; 


Modern Stationery Company 


30 






1 A 1 >..-. - .\ Sons 


40 
34 
39 


Morrison & Fifer 


51 

4 5 


Wall 8 - Insurance 

Washii - • 
Washingl o Wholesale Drug Exchange. Inc. 




I> C. Ignition Headquarters, Inc. 
White 11 


Murray -Baumgartner Company- 
Murray Hardware Company 


i D. Denison Orthopaedic Appliance Corp. . 
J H. DeVeau & Sons. Inc. 


25 






I. I. Wells Company. Inc. 






McLeod-Romborg Stone Company- 


: - 


Western Exterminating Co.. Inc. 




Iiutrich & Gambrill, Inc. 
Dietrich Bros., Inc. 


56 
29 
59 


McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

nal Bank of Cambridge 


52 


\\ < -tinghouse Electric Corp 
White Rice Inn 




Drummond & Company. Inc. 


sale Radio Parts Co., Inc. 




■ - ting Company 


36 


nal Equipment & Supply Co 


5 7 


Perry (I Wilkinson 








Norman Motor Company 


4 5 


Williams Construction Co. 








Normandy Farms 


55 


Carl I. Williams & Sons 




Embassy Dairy 


r " 


N -th Washington Press 


55 


I. McKenny Willi- 












W. K Window Company 


44 


Farmers Cooperative Association 


56 


rntal Restaurant 


50 


Wide Travel Service 


49 


J. H. Filbert. Inc 


56 


i 1 Ohphant 


53 


Wyt Plantation 




Federal Savings & Loan Association 






29 






Kir Banlc of Baltimore 
Fo" ^uipment Co., Inc. 




v 1 nn 


42 


York Wholesalers. Inc. 


35 


Olsen Equipment Co. 






'•erg's Bakers. Inc. 




Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 


36 



60 



THE M ARYL A N D M AGAZINE 




BELL 
SYSTEM 






What is the Bell System? 



-Lhe Bell System is wires and cables 
and laboratories and manufacturing 
plants and local operating companies 
and millions of telephones in every 
part of the country. 

The Bell System is people . . . hun- 
dreds of thousands of employees and 
more than a million and a half men 
and women who have invested their 
savings in the business. 

It is more than that. The Bell 
System is an idea. 

It is an idea that starts with the 
policy of providing you with the best 



possible telephone service at the 
lowest possible price. 

But desire is not enough. Bright 
dreams and high hopes need to be 
brought to earth and made to work. 

You could have all the equipment 
and still not have the service you 
know today. 

You could have all the separate 
parts of the Bell System and not have 
the benefits of all those parts fitted 
together in a nationwide whole. It's 
the time-proved combination of re- 
search, manufacturing and opera- 



tions in one organization— with close 
teamwork between all three — that 
results in good service, low cost, and 
constant improvements in the scope 
and usefulness of your telephone. 

No matter whether it is one of the 
many tasks of everyday operation — 
or the special skills needed to invent 
the Transistor or develop underseas 
telephone cables — the Bell System 
has the will and the way to get it 
done. 

And a spirit of courtesy and serv- 
ice that has come to be a most im- 
portant part of the Bell System idea. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




American Telephone & Telegraph Company • Bell Telephone Laboratories ■ Western Electric Company • New England Telephone & Telegraph Company • Southern New England Telephone 
Company • New York Telephone Company • New Jersey Bell Telephone Company ■ The Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania • Diamond State Telephone Company ■ The Chesapeake 
& Potomac Telephone Companies • Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company • The Ohio Bell Telephone Company • Cincinnati & Suburban Telephone Company • Michigan Bell Tele- 
phone Company • Indiana Bell Telephone Company • Wisconsin Telephone Company • Illinois Bell Telephone Company • Northwestern Bell Telephone Company • Southwestern Bell Telephone 
Company • The Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Company . The Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company • Pacific Telephone- Northwest • Bell Telephone Company of Nevada 



Go deluxe by bus on TrwMl LwwMwS 



^ 




E3/A> 



LUXURY SERVICE to 

New York - Boston - Portsmouth, N. H. - Portland 

Baltimore - Camden - Philadelphia 

and to Richmond - Norfolk 

Operates non-stop between all cities named 




• HOSTESS ABOARD •REFRESHMENTS • M USIC, PI LLOWS, M A6AZ I N ES 

(To attend your every need) (Sandwiches, hot and cold beverages) 

• RESERVED SEATS * NON-STOP BETWEEN LARGEST CITIES 



Never before have you taken a bus trip in such style and comfort. A smiling 
hostess greets you and shows you to your reserved seat. She serves you a sandwich 
as well as hot and cold beverages from the gleaming galley. There are pillows, 
magazines, even music to add to your relaxation and comfort. All weather air- 
conditioning, reclining seats, fully-equipped rest rooms — Trailways 5-Star 
Service provides you with every possible travel luxury. 
We invite you to travel 5-Star . . . exclusive with Trailways with its new 
interstate bus fleet. 5-Star Service is in addition to the many regular Trailways 
departures which also leave daily for the destination shown. 



For reservations and departures, pleas* call 

Baltimore: 

B & A TERMINAL (Temporary) 

100 S. Howard St. (corner Lombard) 
PLaza 22115 

Washington: 

TRAILWAYS TERMINAL 
12th and New York Ave. 
District 7-4200 



take 



TRAILWAYS, 

easiest travel on earth.. 






*T»7»> 



&. 




Univ M..rvUn.l Ubrary 

College Park. Md. 






Vlumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 




Volume XXXI Number Five • July-August 1960 



The Grand Spectacle of Commencement • The Alumni Come Home 



Speaking of Progress 




for itself, 
can't be wrong! 




The 

NEW 

SITE 

For 

SAVERS 



Dividends compounded and paid quarterly 



TM 



RST 




IDERAL 

INWASHINGTON 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN 
ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

Bethesda Branch: 8216 Wisconsin Avenue 
OL. 6-3923 



— Home Office — 

610 13th Street, N.W. Washington 5, D. C. 

Dl. 7-2370 




The Cover: rhis issue ol im Maryland Magazini features an art 
describing ( ommencemenl I nercises foi the ! !8 men and women ol the 
Gass ol I960. Alumni Daj and May Day, both traditional summei events 
are the subject of separate articles. I lie readei will also find accounts i>i 
Baseball Coach Burton Shipley's retirement; a report ol the football 
varsity's 34-6 win over professional alumni; a review ol a new book bj 
Dr. Elbert M. Byrd, instructor of Government and Politics; and a numbei 
of other news items concerning Alumni and University activities. On the 
cover of this issue new graduates of the School of Medicine tip theii caps 
to the I960 (lass of the School of Nursing as the awarding ot degrees is 
announced from the platform. 



the 




magazine 

Volume XXXI 

Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BO ARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK. Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. EWING TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



Number 5 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



JULY AUGUST • 1960 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
MRS. ELIZABETH ROHR SINGLETON. '47, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT. '14, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 

ADVERTISING DIREC TOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 

18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N. W. 
Baltimore 18 Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue — 

FEATURES 

2 
3 
7 

14 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
21 

NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

22 
22 
26 
31 
33 
37 
38 
43 
44 
46 

48 
50 



The Alumni Diary 

Alumni and Campus Notes 

The Grand Spectacle of Commencement 

The Alumni Come Home 

Harriet Husted Is May Queen 

Maryland Books and Authors 

Do You Remember? 

H. Burton Shipley Retires 

Nugent Varsity Overpowers Alumni 

Spring Sports Summary 

Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Education 

Engineering 

Law 

Medicine 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

University College 

Social Notes 
Completed Careers 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879.— $3.00 per year— Fifty cents the copy— Member of American Alumni Council. 



n Alumni Council 

li M I BITOll 

p m Galbreath 
I Stiei 

i i llingei 
lohn i i ampe 
|)i Reginald \ limn. 14 

IDMINIITBA1 

I homas 1 Bourne, Jr., '43 
Ralph w I rey, lr., -4 1 
( hestci W I uwney, '3 I 

i)> Samuel Bryanl 

Harrj l evin, 
Di i dward n Stone, 75 

1 1' i i \i i 

( I. H. i Dixon, ; i 

1 1. n i\ Hasslingei , '33 

I oren I ec l indley, "48 

l mmell I oam 
Robert J Mel eod, '37 

lohn I Waldo, '57 

IHIM I I1CONOUIC1 

Mis I iii. i K. ( hapman, '34 
Mrs Kuih I ( larke, '42 
Mrs lane M West, '40 

orj H Niles, '17 
I uyman I. Redden, '34 
( , Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

mi DM 1^1 

Di I Illusion R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William II. Triplett, 'I I 

NIIIISIM. 

Mrs I I lizabeth K. Hipp. 79 

Mis Noi ni. i S I ong, '49 

Mis | lizabeth R. Singleton, '47 

Ml ARM A I V 

Ih iii. in I). is idov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, 75 
l rank I Slama, '24 

• 

EX-OFI K 10 Ml Mill RS: 
Dr. Wilson II. Llkins 

President <>j the I University 
David I Brigham, '38 

s, i /( ttiry- 1 reasm ei 
Victor Holm. '57, l^'i Secretary 
Harrj A. Boswell, Jr.. '42. Past President 
I rank Block, '24, /'mi President 
Joseph II. Deckman, '31, Past President 
I Gilbert Prendergast, '33. Past President 
I Homei Remsberg, '18. Past President 
Col. O. II. Saunders, '10, Vast President 
Dr. Albert li. Goldstein, '12 

I'tni President 
T. I. Speer, '17. Past 1'residenl 
t V Koons, '29. Past President 

Dr. Aillim I. Bell, '19, Past President 

• 

AH UNI c ; ( /( ni mi sim 17/1 / v 
Baltimore— David W. men, '29 
( .ii ioll County — 

Dr. I awrence I . I eggell, '30 
Cecil County — Dr. Fred S. Fink. '56 
C nmberland — Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
I rederick C ounly — 

James I . Zimmei man. '37 
'M" ( lub — George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery t ounly — 

Robert W. Beall, '31 
New England — George Kerlejza, '2 15 
New Yorl — Harold McGay, "5(1 
Noi Mi Esistei II Shore — 

Robert W. Downes, lr., '4fi 
Overseas- ( ol. Ralph I Williams. "33, '41 
Pittsburgh— Dr. Joseph I inegold, '34 
!'i ince Georges ( ounty — 

I gbei i I.I index . 77 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, "3fi 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
rerra pin— James W. Stevens, '19 
s Dept. ol Agriculture — 

Wilham II Evans, 76 
Washington ( lount) — 

i Scotl ' ouchman, '5 1 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



Tin ( i \ss in I960 lias ahead) established a record. More than 2900 crossed 
the commencement platform before some 15.000 enthused and impressed 
friends and relatives. I ach was excited bv the achievement of someone very close 
who had reached another milestone along the road to academic maturity. 

\s one ol the 12 alumni officers privileged to meet the new graduates as the> 
made the transition from student to alumnus. I found time for reflection even in 
the flow of mass activity. I thought of the novice who was seeing the great expanse 
Of this colorful arena, the pageantry and the great walls of humanity surrounding 
the graduates upon whom the spotlight shone. Past experience, however, directed 
me to the individuals who made up this great assembly. It was not difficult to 
locate the proud parents who had given so much to bring this achievement for 
someone very near to them nor was it difficult to locate the partner-to-be with 
a face made radiant with dreams of the best part of life still ahead. Each had 
planned a gift for the new graduate on this important and significant day. 

This led us to Emerson and his essay on gifts. It was he who said. "The only 
gift is a portion of thyself."' He told also of the poet who brought his poem: the 
shepherd, his lamb; the miner, a gem: the painter, his picture: and. of course. 
the girl who brought a handkerchief of her own sewing. Perhaps most significant 
was his conclusion that. "A man's biography is conveyed in his gifts.'' 

Suppose you as an individual desired to give someone the greatest gift within 
your power and suppose you set about to determine what that gift should be. 
First you would want something of lasting value, something that would not 
deteriorate and wear thin with use. You would not want it to fade or tarnish or 
even sluff away. How nice it would be to have the assurance that your gift would 
become brighter, more valuable, more durable and in fact, indestructible. Addi- 
tional considerations might well be the continued growth of the gift: the fact 
that it could not be bought, sold or exchanged and above all. the assurance that 
it would be constantly in use. Such a gift you would wish for your children, your 
relatives, your friends and in fact for all mankind. This sounds fantastic, impossible 
and vou are undoubtedly saying there can be no such gift. I would hasten to 
point out your error, for the answer to this riddle lies in the purpose of our 
Alumni Association and in the very existence of our University of Maryland. 
Review carefully each of the criterion and you w ill see the gift of a college educa- 
tion fits each category. The significance and impact of a formal and advanced 
education is not passed over lightlv. 

It has been well said that we had best look to the future for that is where 
we will spend the rest of our days. How better could we serve and still reap a 
harvest than by preparing young people for the tides and cross currents of life? 
We mav give financial assistance, words o\ wisdom and encouragement or actually 
be involved in the transmission of some of the knowledge with which we have 
been endowed. In anv case, the future is tied to the present and those who give 
an education have presented the priceless combination oi heritage and opportunity 
to the fertile minds of youth. 

As ever. 



JJ 



'fa*—^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



THE M.UYI. A \ D MAGAZI N B 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



JULY 

27-29 Summer Theater — College Park. 

AUGUST 

5 Slimmer Session Ends — College 

Park. 
8-13 4-H Club Week— College Park. 



SEPTEMBER 

6-9 Firemen's Short Course — College 

Park. 
12-16 Fall Semester Registration. 
12-23 Nursing Institute "Supervision in 

Nursing" — Baltimore. 
19 Instruction begins — College Park. 



NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday — Thanksgiving Recess 

Begins After Last Class 
28 Monday — Thanksgiving Recess Ends 
8 a.m. 

DECEMBER 

20 Tuesday — Christmas Recess Begins. 




David L. brigham, Director of Alumni Relations, is shown presenting the Alumni Cup 
to Cadet 2d Lt. Joseph M. Brown. The award is offered each year to the best drilled 
Flight within the AFROTC cadet corps. Lt. Brown is a freshman in Arts & Sciences. The 
occasion of the award was AFROTC Day, an event held each spring on the College Park 
campus. Thirty-one awards were presented to students who excelled in air science during 
the year. 



Giavasis to Direct Fund 

The Office of Endowment and Develop- 
ment has recently appointed George P. 
Giavasis as the Greater University of 
Maryland Fund Director. Mr. Giavasis, 
a graduate of the class of '57, assumed 
his duties in June following a three-year 
tour of duty in the United States Air 
Force as a navigator. After graduating 
from the College of Arts and Sciences 
and receiving his commission from the 
University, he entered navigation train- 
ing at Harlingen Air Base, Texas. From 
there he was sent on into advanced 
navigation and bombing school at 
Mather Air Base. California and fin- 
ished his duty in Japan. 

While at Maryland as an undergrad- 
uate, he served as President of Phi Delta 
Theta, social fraternity; Vice President 
of the Men's League; and for three years 
served as assistant to Joseph F. Blair. 
Director of Sports Publicity. 

Originally from Catonsville, Mary- 
land, Mr. Giavasis is now residing in 
Bethesda, Maryland, with his wife, a 
former student at the Universits. Mar\ 
Gayle Minton. and their one-year-old 
son, Nicholas. 



July-August, 1960 



Fund— Report in Brief 

: has happened during the I960 
rcrsit) ol Maryland Fund? 

ol June I J, I960, with more con- 
tributiom coming in ever) d.iv. the I960 
iiyurc* show $196,130.27 in contribu- 
tions ihis amount was contributed by 
2.IK) alunim I he total cumulative 
amount, dating from January I. I 
now cornea to $385,505.27, contributed 
b) 8,131 alumni A complete account- 
ing ol the I l H><) I und drive will appear 
in the honor roll which Will he sent out 
to all alumni during August. 



Calvert Society Debates 

l his year was an unusual one for the 
l Diversit) ol Maryland debating team. 

I he Calvert Dehate Society, under the 
direction of Malthon M. Anapol. In- 
structor in Speech and Dramatic Art. 
started well and ended well . . . but 
in between were some bitter disappoint- 
ments." Ihus was the record summar- 
ized hv the Culvert Chronicle. 



Student debaters participated in 19 
tournaments, travelling 3,970 miles. Of 
the 230 decision debates, the Maryland 
team won 123 tor a 53 '< average. 

Two large tournaments occur each 
spring. I he third annual Capitol Hill 

tournament proved to be a success 
with 31 of the nation's colleges and 
universities represented. Final debate 
competition on the topic "Resolved: 

I hat ( ongress should be given the 
power to reverse decisions ol the Su- 
preme Court,* 1 took place February 27 
in the Senate Caucus Room. The pro- 
gram included greetings by Hon. 
Thomas ( lark. Associate Justice. United 
States Supreme Court, and a luncheon 
address by Senator Kenneth Keating of 
New York. 

I he tilth annual Maryland High 
School Drama and Forensic Festival 
took place on April 2. It was attended 
bv 24 Maryland high schools with about 
170 students entered. 

In the words of the Chronicle, ". . . 
perhaps it can be considered a year in 
which Calvert matured a bit after the 
great spurt of growth which took place 
last year." 




mi PROl I ssor of vir s ( n \( i of the University of Maryland's Air Force ROTC detach- 
ment has been honored "for significant contributions to aerospace education and national 
security." Shown here is Colonel Theodore R. Aylesworth receiving an Arnold Air 
Society citation from Bnu. Gen. William J. Bell. Commandant. Air Font ROTC. at 
the society's annual awards ceremonies. The society is an organization of AFRO I ( 
ladets at ross the country. The citation praised Colonel Axlesworih. for "distinguished 
leadership'' in his AFROK duties as Professor of Air Science at the Universit 
Maryland. Twenty-one other Al ROTC detachments a< ross the nation also received 
Arnold Air Society (nations during the llth National Arnold Air Society Conclave held 
at Miami. Florida. April 29-Maj 2. I960. 





Mr. Lefrak 

Lefrak's City of Tomorrow 

Samuel J. I.efrak. B.P.A. '40. has 
undertaken to build a city within a city. 
His fabulous 'city of tomorrow'* will 
consist of twenty 16-story apartments 
located in the geographical center of 
the four major boroughs which com- 
prise New York City. The site is a 40- 
acre tract purchased from the Astor 
estates in the borough of Queens 

Expected to cost in excess of $100,- 
000.000 Lefrak City— as the project will 
be known — will house more than 25.000 
people in 5.000 family units. It will be 
the largest apartment house develop- 
ment in the world constructed with pri- 
vate conventional financing and without 
tax abatement or other government as- 
sistance. It will have an office building, 
two theaters and its own helioport: its 
own tennis courts, underground park- 
ing garages and ten olympic-size swim- 
ming pools, five outdoors and five in- 
doors: fountains, formal gardens and 
recreation areas. 

"The keynote of this project." I i 
says, "is enjoyable living." 

Lefrak City may have two important 
innovations built in. if present plans 
mature. Engineers of the Lefrak Or- 
ganization are currently investigating 
the feasibility of an atomic power plant 
for the development. Research scien- 
tists at General Electric arc working 
v. ith the lefrak organization to deter- 
mine the possibility oi making the proj- 
ect an all-electric city. With this simpli- 
fied but efficient system each tenant 
would be able to control and regulate 
his own hot water supply, cooking, 
heating, cooling and ventilating. 



the Maryland Magazine 



Iii spite ol the elegant mode ol liv- 
ing which will be available to the ten- 
ants ol Lefrak City, rents will follow 

the middle income class pattern ol 

other I efrak apartment houses and 

average about $43 per room per month. 
Completion Ol the project is sched- 
uled for 1964. to coincide with the 
opening of the World's Fair in New 
York City. Mr. l efrak believes that his 
"city of tomorrow" may prove to be 
"the model lor similar developments 
throughout the world." 



Union Holds Open House 

The Student Senate of the professional 
schools held open house at the new 
Baltimore Union May 1 I for students 
and faculty of the Baltimore campus. 

Director of the new $ 1.500,000 build- 
ing conducted two tours for the visi- 
tors. Mr. Ruttman. who has been Direc- 
tor of the Union since January. I960, 
was formerly Director of the Medical 
Residence Hall at the Johns Hopkins 
University. He is a graduate of Michi- 
gan State University, where he special- 
ized in institution management. 

The Union, when complete, will house 
195 students in 99 rooms. Among its 
other facilities are a book and instru- 
ment store, game room, barber shop, 
cafeteria, fountain lounge, roof terrace 
for dancing, meeting rooms, and 
lounges. 



Resolution Honors Singer sponsored annually by the Maryland 



Dr. s. Fred Singer, Professor ol Physics, 

has been cited as one ol the two Amer- 
ican scientists who discovered the Greal 

Radiation Belt surrounding the earth 

Senator J. Glenn Beall oi Maryland 
and Senator Boiuke B. Hickcnlooper of 
Iowa recently introduced in the Senate 
a Joint Resolution recognizing and hon- 
oring Professor Singer and Professor J. 
A. Van Allen of low a, who have worked 
together in many cooperative space 
undertakings. 

In introducing the Joint Resolution, 
Senator Beall stated, "Professor Van 
Allen made the discovery of the radia- 
tion belt through the use of the United 
States Explorer satellites. . . The theo- 
retical existence of the Van Allen belt 
was advanced earlier by Professor S. F. 
Singer of Maryland." 

The Joint Resolution is intended to 
"express to the two scientists connected 
with the discovery of the Great Radia- 
tion Belt some of the appreciation that 
the people of this country feel for their 
important work." 



Better Newspaper Contest 

The 1959 Better Newspaper Contest 
was held on the College Park campus 
this spring. The state-wide contest for 
both weekly and daily newspapers is 




secretary OF the treasury Robert b. Anderson was recently awarded the first hon- 
orary membership in Gamma Sigma chapter of Delta Sigma Pi, professional business 
fraternity. Members of the Maryland chapter conducted a formal initiation ceremony 
in the Secretary's offices at the Treasury Building. Attending the ceremony were Anthony 
A. Zdanis; Robert Towers; Thomas Morrissey, Past President of the chapter and Presi- 
dent of the SGA; Dr. John H. Frederick, Head, Business Organization; Howard Boyer; 
Michael L. Myerson, in-coming President; Stewart D. Young, President; Dr. Allan J. 
Fisher, faculty adviser; Floyd Bridges; Dean James H. Reid; Dr. J. Allan Cook, first 
semester faculty adviser; Richard D. Hyde, Treasurer; Joseph S. Carr, Past President; 
Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of the Board of Regents. 



Press Association, in cooperation with 
the University ol Maryland, fudging 
was by members oi the West Virginia 
Press Association 

I he Baltimore News Post took ftrsl 
place iii a competition for the best edi 
torials open to both daily and weekly 
newspapers. I wo other lirst place awards 
went to the News-Post, rhey were for 

the best news picture ami excellence in 

typography, [he Baltimore Evening Sun 
was aw anled first place lor general ex- 
cellence among the dailies. A lirst place- 
award for community service went to 
the daily Hagerstown Morning Herald 

In a competition for weekly news- 
papers with over 5.0(H) circulation, the 
Montgomery County Sentinel. Rock- 
villc, took first place for general excel- 
lence. The Suburban Record, Silver 
Spring, took first place in community 
service. Excellence in typography first 
place award went to the Catholic Re- 
view, Baltimore. 

Three first place awards were won 
by the Denton County Record in a 
competition for weeklies under 5,000 
circulation. They were for general ex- 
cellence, community service and excel- 
lence in typography. 



DeMarr Assumes New Duties 

Frederick S. DeMarr, teacher and ad- 
ministrator at the University since 1953, 
has been appointed Dean of Men at C. 
W. Post College, Long Island, New 
York. 

For three and a half years Mr. 
DeMarr served as an instructor in the 
Department of Government and Poli- 
tics in the Overseas Program. In 1956 
he was appointed Assistant Dean of 
Men on the College Park campus. In 
the recently organized office of the 
Executive Dean for Student Life. Mr. 
DeMarr has served as Assistant Dean 
since 1958. 

Mr. DeMarr received his bachelor 
of arts degree from the University in 
1949 and his master's degree in 1953. 

In his last responsibility at the Uni- 
versity Mr. DeMarr acted as coordi- 
nator of student activities, director of 
freshman orientation, general and finan- 
cial adviser to student government and 
coordinator of religious activities. 

C. W. Post College is a branch of 
Long Island University, a liberal arts 
institution, founded in 1926. Long 
Island has an enrollment of about 4,000. 



July- August, 1960 




m 4 fc , 




-* 



*Y. 







S 



/ 









The Grand Spectacle of 
Commencement 



Would it rain or shine? The weather man wasn't sure 
and neither were the graduates who waited outside 
the Wm. P. Cole Student Activities Building. Assembled fac- 
ulty members moved inside to await the signal to begin their 
procession, but the threatening clouds did not daunt the 
gowned students who gathered in formation on the outside. 
When the opening note of the Triumphal March from Aula 
was sounded, the students began marching toward their seats 
in a procession which lasted 25 minutes. 

A record class had donned caps and gowns for the June 
4 Commencement ceremonies. A short 15 years ago, Mary- 
land University awarded degrees to 697 students. The 1960 
class totaled 2,828 degree candidates — which amounts to a 
400 percent increase. The number of graduates has been 
growing at a rapid rate since 1956, and this trend seems likely 
to continue throughout the foreseeable future. 

When the procession was completed, the Reverend Dr. 
Carl R. Pritchett of the Bethesda Presbyterian Church pro- 
nounced the Invocation. His daughter, Mary Anna, was 
awarded a Bachelor of Science degree later in the ceremony. 

The Honorable Thomas B. Finan, Secretary of State, Mary- 
land, brought greetings to the assemblage for Governor 
Tawes, who was unable to appear. Mr. Finan said: "We 
may, I think, safely envision great progress in the whole 
field of learning in Maryland during the next decade. The 
enlargement and the improvement of the University of Mary- 
land will, of course, figure prominently in this progress. I 
wish also to compliment Dr. Elkins and the faculty for their 
dedicated efforts in raising ever higher the academic standards 
of this institution." 

Following the greetings brought by Mr. Finan, Charles P. 
McCormick, Chairman of the Board of Regents, spoke briefly 
to the gathering. 

Principal speaker for the occasion was the Honorable 
Fred A. Seaton, United States Secretary of the Interior. Mr. 
Seaton is well known for his work in the fields of journalism, 
business, and government. A Nebraska newspaper and radio 



M ju . j . 







July-August, 1960 



d former l uited States Senator from that state, 

In- i, u Secretar) ol the Interior since his appoint- 

dent l isenhower in 1956. Secretary Seaton first 

ed in the Eisenhower Administration from 1953-1955 

S retarj ol Defense. He has also served as 

inistrative Assistant to the President and as Mr Eisen- 

bOWei s Deputy Assistant. 



T 



k \< ist, i hi 1 1 ik i ii i m i Ki HISTORY of the United States 

from the first settlements of Jamestown and Plymouth 

to the lirst raising, on July fourth at Foil McHenry. ol the 

nations neu fitlv-star flag— Mr. Seaton said that the core 

of the American ideal remains the attempt to achieve a society 
in which "no man is unjustly discriminated against socially 
or politically or in his business or in the schoolroom of his 
children " 

Secretar) Seaton, commenting on the early Maryland 
experience with the concept of religious tolerance, said: 

I reedom as it has developed in Maryland, and throughout 
all the 50 States ot the Union, has still other dimensions. 
Americans believe man should be free from the fear ol 



private individuals or groups who would take the law into 
their own hands, free from arbitrary actions of government, 
tree to participate in politics and to choose his elected repre- 
sentatives. We also believe he should be free to take advan- 
tage of an equal educational opportunity for all. free to 
select his occupation, and tree to advance in proportion to 
his own abilities and efforts. 

Music to all ot these freedoms is our firm belief in the 
dignity of the individual as a child of God. This we derive 
from our deep grounding in the philosophy of the Old and 
New testaments. This we express in our Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, in the Constitution and the laws of the land derived 
from it. and we advance it through the personal consideration 
and courtesy of one man for another. 

"Our concept of freedom is one of the most important 
parts of the national legacy which this graduating class in- 
herits. It is intrinsically far more important than the standard 
of living which is the happy lot of American citizens. 

"Automobiles, kitchen appliances, and television sets, no 
matter how much we enjoy them — and we do — are not the 
true measure of the way of life which you inherit in common 



T 



--—. 






'7^^.-^ iff 



■* ': 



A 'Z 



>> ry 




secretary seaton delivers the Commencement Address. 



with your fellows. They are but some of its welcome 
byproducts. 

"The main product, developed over three centuries of risk 
and fervent striving for the fulfillment of an ideal at the cost 
of countless lives, is the inalienable right of the so-called 
'common man' to make of himself a most uncommon indi- 
vidual if he so chooses; to dream of the 'good life' and also 
to have the opportunity to achieve it." 

Progress toward this ideal has not been steady or swift, 
Mr. Seaton continued: ". . . we can all recall to mind exam- 
ples of intolerance and persecution, and things which have 
happened for which we must be ashamed." But, he said, 

". . . our system has the built-in ways and means by which 
progress can be made in every field of human interest. That is 
the important thing to remember. We do make progress in 
solving our social problems and in rectifying human wrongs, 
just as we make progress in science and technology. The 
alternative system, as practiced behind the iron curtain, can 
and does make material progress but at a terrible cost of 
human values. Rather than exalting the innate dignity of man, 
it destroys every vestige of it that it can. 

"Expressed concern about the way things are going, and 
the offering of constructive criticism simply represent the 
proper exercise of prudency and the discharge of the duty 
of the watchful citizen. But to indulge in derogation and to 
spread divisiveness among our people is only to aid every 
enemy of America, within or without." 

Describing some of the important contributions which 
foreign-born Americans have contributed to the American 
society, Secretary Seaton outlined the present Administration's 
proposal "to gain sensible amendments to the archaic and what 



arc. m some ways, even inhumane immigration lawa ol the 
United States" 1 he proposal suggests doubling ol the 154,000 
annual quota for immigrants, liberalizing ol the quotas foi 
e\er\ counir> and moderation ol "the features ol existing 
law which operate unfair!) against certain areas ol the 
world." rhe proposal would "abandon the concept <>i race 
and ethnic classifications for the purposes ol the recom- 
mended increases, and lie the annual over-all limitation on 
immigration to the current census rather than unrealisticalK 
to the 1920 census which is now the case. 

"It WOUld also make special provision lor the absorption 
Ol many thousands of persons who are refugees- persons 
literally without a country as a result of political upheavals 
and their flight from persecution." 

Concluding his address, Secretary Seaton told the 1960 
graduating class that they had been "the beneficiaries of an 
excellent and unregimented educational system" and they had 
been "prepared to contribute much to the good of society here 
at home and abroad." 

"Because of that and because you are what you are, I have 
every confidence you will discharge your responsibilities in 
full measure." 



ollowing the address, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President 
of the University, conferred an honorary Doctor of Laws 
degree upon Secretary Seaton. 

An honorary Doctor of Engineering degree was conferred 
upon James E. Dingman, Vice President and Chief Engineer 
for the American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Mr. 
Dingman obtained a degree from the College of Engineering 
in 1921. 

Robert Evans Snodgrass, cited as a "dedicated scientist, 
renowned scholar, and eminent leader in the field of ento- 
mology," was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree. 
For nearly 25 years he served as a special lecturer and coun- 
selor of advanced students at the University. 

Honorary certificates of merit in agriculture were awarded 
to five Maryland citizens: Paul S. Hofmann of Baltimore 
County, Mrs. Mildred R. Kern of Caroline County, Mrs. 
Kathleen L. Robie of Prince George's County, Hubert L. 
Snodgrass of Harford County, and Paul M. Widdowson, Sr., 
of Wicomico County. 

The procession of degree candidates across the platform 
began, following the honorary awards, and each candidate 
was given his treasured sheepskin. When the candidates from 
the Nursing School were announced, the M.D.'s stood, faced 
the girls and tipped their caps. 

No longer students, members of the Class of '60 joined 
those graduates of previous years who make up the Univer- 
sity's large body of loyal alumni. Each new graduate was 
welcomed into the alumni group and presented a membership 
in the Alumni Association. 

Benediction was pronounced by the Reverend Robert B. 
Gribbon, Canon, Trinity Cathedral, Easton, Md. Rev. 
Gribbon's daughter, Sara Lee, and her husband, Ralph Evans, 
both received Bachelor of Arts degrees from the College of 
Education. 



July-August, 1960 





MoNoKMO DKiKI Is \KI \\\ \HI)I I) In 

Secretary Seaton, Doctor of Laws 



Mr. Dingman, Doctor of Engineering 



Dr. Snodgrass. Doctor of Science 



1. ki -( 0MM1 n< i mi n i celebrations on the Baltimore campus 
USUall) revolve around "June Week"" activities which include 
banquets, award assemblies, dances, and alumni reunions. 
I his year's calendar was full o\ activities. 

I he Medical School celebrated Alumni Day on June 2. 
Dr. Stanley E. Bradley, '38, Professor of Medicine and Chair- 
man oi the Department at Columbia University School of 
Medicine, received the I960 honor award and gold key of 
the Medical Alumni Association. Certificates of life member- 
ship were awarded to the Class of 1910 of the University of 
Maryland Medical School, the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, and the Baltimore Medical College. 

Dr. Louis A. M. krause was the principal speaker at pre- 
commencement exercises June 3. held in the auditorium of 
the new Health Sciences Library. Dr. Krause, who is Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Medicine at the Medical School and Chief 
of Medicine at Lutheran Hospital, is widely known not only 
for his work in internal medicine but also for his research in 
biblical archeology. He is a member of the American School 
of Oriental Research and has visited the Holy Land on sev- 
eral archeological expeditions. Prizes and honors were award- 
ed to outstanding students by Dean William S. Stone, and a 
reception and tea was held for graduates and families in the 
new Baltimore Union. 

A pre-commencement tea held June 1 at the School of 
Nursing honored members of the graduating class. The even- 



ing before, the nurses had gathered for their traditional cap- 
stringing. The School's fluted cap. designed by Florence 
Nightingale, must be strung to fit each individual wearer. 
This year the cap-stringing ceremonies followed a dinner at 
Peerce"s Plantation. 

The 43rd annual banquet and dance of the Nurses' Alumnae 
Association was held at the Hotel Emerson June 3. Nine 
graduating seniors received special recognition for their out- 
standing performance as students. Class reunions were held 
and honor paid to those alumnae celebrating anniversaries 
of 50. 55, 60 and 65 years. 

Ellis B. Myers, '2X. Executive Vice President of the Read 
Drug and Chemical Company, received the 1960 alumni 
award of the School of Pharmacy at the annual banquet of 
the School's Alumni Association, held June 2 at the Baltimore 
Union. The occasion was in honor of the graduating class. 
Certificates were presented to ten 50-year graduates by Dr. 
Victor Morgenroth. President of the Alumni Association, who 
also installed the Association's newly elected officers. 

Principal speaker at the Pharmacy Honors Convocation 
June 2 was Dr. Albin O. Kuhn. Executive Vice President of 
the University. Dr. Kuhn's speech preceded the awarding o\ 
honors to the School's outstanding students. 

Major General Robert H. Mills. 07. who retired in 1946 
from the U. S. Army Dental Corps after 37 years of service. 



\i i mm ki pri si \ i errvi S uere on hand to welcome into alumni ranks graduates from 
each of the 14 schools and colleges. Lach graduate was the recipient of a sear's mem- 
bership in the Alumni Association. Six alumni representatives are pictured here. 



m ksim,: Norma long and Dean Gipe. 



\rts and sciences: W. Gilbert Dent and 
Dean Smith. 



UNIVl rsitv college: Ham Boswell and 
Associate Dean Poffenherger. 




received the Distinguished Alumni Award of the Alumni 
Association of the Baltimore College of Denial Surgery, 
Dental School. The award highlighted alumni activities held 

at the Dental School June 2-3. Dr. K\rle W. Preis. Professor 
of Orthodontics and Head ol the Department, received the 
facult] service award and David L Brigham, Director of 
Alumni Relations of the University, received the honorary 
alumnus award. Student awards were presented by Dean 
\|\ ron S. Aisenberg. 



A 



. NOTHER UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND COMMENCEMENT 

was celebrated across the Atlantic. On May 28, President 
Elkins awarded bachelor's degrees to 124 persons enrolled in 
the European Division. Because of military reassignment of 
graduates, only 73 were on hand to receive their diplomas. 

The ceremony took place at the University of Heidelberg, 
where over 1,000 dignitaries and guests had gathered for the 
occasion. Dr. Ray Ehrensberger, Dean of University College, 
presided. Brig. General Herman Beukema, USA, Retired, 
extended his greetings as Director of the European Division, 
and Mr. Edward F. Holter. Vice Chairman of the University's 
Board of Regents, extended greetings on behalf of that body. 
Miss Adele Stamp, University of Maryland Dean of Women, 
also attended the ceremony. 

Professor Dr. Wilhelm Hahn, Rector of Heidelberg Uni- 
versity, spoke to the gathering, extending best wishes to 
Heidelberg's "American Sister-University," affirming not only 
that "an excellent relationship exists between our University 
and the University of Maryland, but also between Americans 
and Germans as a whole." 

The Commencement speaker was Willy Brandt, Governing 
Mayor of Berlin. Significantly, the date of the Maryland 
graduation marked the first anniversary of Soviet Premier 
Khrushchev's initial threat to drive the Western Powers out 
of the four-power city. 

Mayor Brandt was elected Governing Mayor of Berlin 
in October, 1957. A Social Democrat since 1930, he fled West 
Germany for Norway in 1933 under threat of arrest by the 
Gestapo. Following the war, he represented Berlin for a year 
on the committee of the Social Democratic Party. He then 
became a member of the German Federal Bundestag ( Lower 
House) during its first and second sessions. Since 1950 he 
has been a member of the West Berlin house of representa- 
tives (city parliament) and its President since 1955. 



DEGR1 IS \\n CERTIFH \ II s 


( ONI I RR1 D 


ii \l 


4. 


I960 






GRADU \ll si HOOI 










Ph. 1). 






K2 




Id. D. 






12 




M. A. 






1 1 1 




M. S. 






138 




M. id. 






127 




M. B. A. 






25 




Total 








4 l >s 


MEDICINE 








84 


t)i \ I isi io 








97 


LAW 








106 


AGRICULTURE 








60 


ARTS AND S( 11 M 1 S 










B. A. 






295 




B. S. 






131 




B. Mus. 






2 




Total 

BUSINESS AND PUR1 It ADM 








42K 
259 


IMS 1 RATION 


EDUCATION 










B. A. 






47 




B. S. 






236 




Total 








283 


ENGINEERING . 








237 


HOME ECONOMICS 








59 


NURSING 








54 


PHARMACY 








42 
49 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 


HEAI 1 II 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 










B. A 






103 




B. S. 






472 




Total 








575 


Grand Total 






j 


,828 



Speaking in English, Mayor Brandt called himself the 
spokesman for his fellow citizens of Berlin — "a representa- 
tive of a city which is divided (in half) and exposed to 
pressure, but in which there is nevertheless a great zest for 
work and a feeling of deep confidence." 

In discussing the problems of his city. Mayor Brandt said: 
"We in Berlin have lived through the horrors of the Hitler 
regime and we have not forgotten them. We in Berlin have 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION. RECREATION AND 

health: David L. Brigham. 



home economics: Mrs. Erna R. Chapman. 



education: Dorothy L. Ordwein. 





mi mPPOCRATK OATH is administered to the 1960 graduating class of the School of Medicine by Dean 
William S Stone. M.D.. at precommencement exercises in the new Health Sciences Library. Baltimore. 



experienced communist totalitarianism, and day alter da\ we 
hear about the oppression which our fellow countrymen in 
the territories surrounding our city have to suffer at the 
hands of a regime which was forced upon them. We are 
determined to make personal sacrifices rather than contribute 
b\ our inactivity to a development which would once again 
deprive us of our rights and turn us into slaves. . . . 

"When the Berlin crisis was launched out of the blue by a 
Soviet ultimatum in November. 1958, this was. among other 
things, an attempt to inflict a moral defeat on the West by 

making an example of this city. . . . 

'The example of Berlin will show what the concept of . . . 
co-existence really means and how the global differences be- 



tween opposite interests and ideological currents have to be 
settled if the danger of belligerent explosions is to retreat . . . 
more and more into the background. . . . 

"Berlin is a touchstone where the sincerity of determination 
to relax tensions and to lessen friction between opposing inter- 
national ideologies will be tested. . . . It is a lie-detector for 
international politics. 

He continued. 'I am not at all pessimistic about the struggle 
ahead of us in the coming years and decades. I do not beliexe 
that the good will triumph automatically, but I do beliexe that 
ethical forces and spiritual values may bring victory in decisive 
situations." 



W PRECOMMENCEMEN1 EXERCISES for the School of Dentistry graduates and alumni. 





miw from the SPEAKER'S TABLE of the 35th Annual Banquet of the Alumni Association. 
School of Pharmacy, in the dining area of the new Baltimore Campus Union-Dormitory. 



Speaking on education. Mayor Brandt, who is chairman 
of the trustees of both the technical and free universities, said, 
"It would be absurd to expect Germany today to be chemic- 
ally purified of any trace of Naziism." But West Berlin's 
youth are not only critical of the past but are prepared to 
fight for a good cause. He concluded, "The sooner that young 
people learn about the responsibility of every single citizen 
to the state and to the international community, the better it 
will be for the task ahead of us." 



In recognition of his outstanding leadership of the free 
people of West Berlin, an honorary Doctor of Laws degree 
was conferred on Mayor Brandt. He was cited as "the man 
above all others whose dynamic resistance to the East makes 
him revered as an individual and hailed as a symbol." 



victor h. morgenroth, jr., left, Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association, School 
of Pharmacy, presents the 1960 Hon- 
ored Alumnus Award to Mr. Ellis 
Myers, '28, Executive Vice President 
and General Manager of Read Drug 
and Chemical Company, Baltimore. 




willy brandt, mayor of Berlin, presents the principal address at commencement exercises 
of the European Division, at Heidelberg University. 




The Alumni Come Home 



mis U.UMNUS-TO-BI OBVIOUSLY ENJOYED his barbecued 
thicken. "I ho luncheon was held on the Student Union Patio. 




THE I960 \i i mm i>-.\ was a real success in several direc- 
tions. Attendance and participation was the best ever 
and the weather man gave his broadest smile. The football 
game between the Varsity and a squad of 50 former greats, 
many of whom are now in professional ranks, was filled with 
action and color. 

Focal point for Class Reunions, the traditional Chicken 
Barbecue Luncheon, and annual Business Sessions, was the 
Student Union Building. Attention was again directed to the 
"Five Year" reunion classes. As anticipated, excellent response 
came from the golden and silver anniversary classes of 1910 
and 1935. Prominent among the 50-year returnees was Col. 
O. H. Saunders, a Past President of the University's Alumni 
Association. Maryland's drum-major and a majorette were 
on hand to greet this man who had served as the first drum- 
major at College Park a half century before. 

Tracy Coleman, of the class of 1935. who has remained 
the class President since his freshman year, led a group of 
nearly 75 who not only had reunion sessions during the da\ 
but climaxed the occasion with an evening banquet. President 
Emeritus. Dr. H. C. "Curly" Byrd. addressed the class and 
highlighted his remarks with an expression of the satisfaction 
a person receives in noting the success and achievement of 
those in whom they have an indirect but \er\ personal 
investment. 

Those returning from the class of 1910 in addition to Col. 
Saunders were: Herschel H. Allen. William J. Frere. Frank 
James Maxwell. Walter Dayton Munson. Clarence William 
Strickland, and an unexpected but welcome addition. Dr. 
Alexander J. Maysels, a graduate of the Medical School in 
this same year. 

Other features of the day included a morning coffee hour, 
a triangular track meet and a post game dessert hour. The 
Home Economics alumnae held a special session in the Mary- 
land Room oi Margaret Brent Hall to honor Dr. Selm.. I 
I ippeatt. Dean oi the College Mrs. Erna R. Chapman. Presi- 
dent oi the Home Economics Alumnae Board, introduced the 
Dean for an address on the subject. "Looking Ahead in Home 
Economics." Special guests included President Elkins. the 
Executive \ ice President. Dr. Kuhn. and others of the Uni- 
versity family. 



14 



HIE M A R Y I A N D MAGAZINE 




COL. O. H. SAUNDERS (U. s. vRMY. ki i.) relives past glories when he was the 
University's first drum major. Helping him don the tall hat are Patricia 
Hershberger, a drum majorette, and Michael Board, drum major. Col. Saunders 
was on hand to help the Class of 1910 celebrate their golden anniversary. 



partial view of the annual barbecue luncheon staged out- 
doors on the patio and grounds of the Student Union Building. 




July-August, 1960 



15 




HOM1 ECONOMICS ALUMNA] paid honor to 

their college's Dean. Dr. Selma F. I ip- 

peatt, shown on the far right. Also facing 

the camera were Mrs Miriam L, Heall. 

'31; President Elkins; Mrs Ema K. Chap- 
man, '34; ami Dr. Alhin (). Kuhn. Execu- 
tive Nice President of the University. 







Miss Husted is 1960 May Queen 



CROWNING A QUEEN AT THE TRADITIONAL MAY DAY CEl.E- 
bratiOD is the equivalent of crowning tour years of 
dedicated service by a University woman. 

Harriet Husted was selected this year to wear the crown 
of the May Queen. This outstanding senior woman was active 
in the Associated Woman Students, serving as President of 
that body. She was selected this year for Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universities and Colleges, chosen on 
the basis of service to the University. Miss Husted was tapped 
for Mortar Board last year. Chief among her other activities 
were her duties as captain of the Drum Majorettes. Miss 
Husted received a B.S. degree at the commencement cere- 
monies and plans to be married in July to Wayne McCiinnis, 
Phys. Ed. '59. 

Runners-up to Miss Husted were Betty Conklin and Connie 
Cornell. The AWS Women's Employment Conference this 



year titled Miss Conklin "Miss Future Success. She was a 
member of Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Kappa Phi scholar- 
ship honoraries, and served as president of the junior class 
and vice president of the senior class. Miss Cornell is best 
known for her work with the University Theater. She played 
the lead in the UT Production "Come Back Little Sheba" 
and was a member of the National Collegiate Players. Both 
Miss Conklin and Miss Cornell were selected for Who's Who. 

In addition to crowning the queen, 1 I new members ol 
Mortar Board were tapped. 

The theme of the May 10 celebration was "May Day 
Around the World" and many of the participants were 
dressed in costumes from other countries. Children of the 
alumni and faculty took an active part as flower girls and 
crown bearers. 




Maryland Books and Authors 

Edited by Mrs. Harold Haves, Head, Maryland and Rare Books Department 



Uvrd. I Ibert M.. Jr. IKI.ATIES 
AND I \1 ( UTTVE AGREE- 
MENTS IN THE UNITED 
STATES. The Hague: Martinus 
Nijhoff. New York: W. S. Hem- 
man. I960. $8.00. 

DR. BYRD has entered the contro- 
versy of the constitutional role 
dI the Executive in foreign affairs with 
the intention of showing a pattern in 
the many apparently irreconcilable con- 
flicts. While this book does not pretend 
to cover the subject of treaties and ex- 
ecutive agreements exhaustively, it is 
a forceful challenge to the concept that 
treaties and executive agreements sup- 
ported by a simple majority in both 
houses oi Congress may be interchange- 
able, and to the "inherent powers" doc- 
trine. A novel theory is presented as a 
basis for determining the proper use of 
treaties and specific occasions when 
various types of executive agreements 
should be used. 

The arguments against the "inherent 
powers" doctrine include a direct attack 
against elements of the Supreme Court's 
Curtiss Wright decision (299U.S304) 
challenging the possibility of defining 
the distinction between internal and 
external affairs; suggesting the powers 
of Texas should have cautioned Mr. 
Justice Sutherland in his statement that 
the states "never possessed international 
powers"; and saying writers "who un- 
critically accepted the inherent power 
doctrine . . . apparently accepted the 
biased American historv given in the 
opinion . . .". International Executive 
Agreements — a very comprehensive 
book written by Wallace \l McClure 
(1941) is summarily dismissed, prin- 
cipally tor providing "no overt theory"; 
and the articles in the March and June 




Dr. Byrd 



1945 issues of the Yale Law Journal 
by Myres S. McDougal and Asher Lans 
are noted as resting on the "inherent 
powers" theory and therefore unaccept- 
able. "If treaties and Congressional Ex- 
ecutive agreements are wholly inter- 
changeable, there no longer remains a 
constitutional distribution of powers; 
and if an inherent power doctrine pre- 
vails, there no longer remains constitu- 
tional government." These articles, with 
the opposite view expressed in the 1944 
Yale Law Journal at page 664 by 
Edwin Borchard, and McClure"s book, 
should be associated reading. The cute 
little war in the footnotes with Edwin 
S. Corwin shouldn't be missed. 

The conclusion as to differentiation in 
the use of executive agreements and 
treaties depends upon the philosophv 
that powers reserved to the states by 
the 10th Amendment, while limiting 
Congress in its ability to support an 
Executive agreement, do not limit two- 
thirds of the Senators present with the 
I \eeuti\e. The concept, novel today, 
though suggested by Ja\. is that the 
President and Senate form a fourth 
branch o\ government, the treaty-mak- 



ing branch, based upon the new theorv 
that framers of the Constitution intend- 
ed that Senators serve their separate 
states as Ambasadors with plenary 
powers. 

The bibliography, definitions, and 
suggested research deserve considera- 
tion. Chapters treating subject matter 
in a unique manner are "The Founding 
Fathers on Foreign Affairs" and "Trea- 
ties Made by the Founding Fathers, 
though it is recommended that the con- 
cluding chapter be read first to under- 
stand the complex presentation. 

Elbert M. Byrd. Jr., instructor of 
Government and Politics. University oi 
Maryland since 1957. received a Ph.D. 
in 1959 from the American University, 
Washington. D. C. has also attended 
the University of Alabama: the United 
States Army Strategic Intelligence 
School: and the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

Reviewed by 

Harry A. Boswell. Jr.. '42 

/'resident of the University of Maryland 

General Alumni Council 

Mr. Boswell is a modern version of 
the old tidewater Maryland and Vir- 
ginia concept of a man with broad inter- 
ests, including law. economics, engi- 
neering, sociology, and political theorv. 
approached from both a practical and 
scholarly viewpoint. He is Chairman of 
the Maryland Economic Development 
Commission; Senior Member. Harrv V 
Boswell Associates, Urban Research 
and Development; and President. Harrv 
A. Boswell Company, Realtors. Trav- 
eled widely in Europe. Asia, and the 
United States, he has attended numer- 
ous universities and technical schools, 
graduating from the University of Mary- 
land with first honors in 1942. 



s 



the Maryland Magazine 




Do You Remember? 



THE ABOVE PICTURE IS ONE TAKEN IN 1905, ON THE FIRST 
corn improvement train run east of the Mississippi. From 
left to right (with their positions at that time): William L. 
Amos, Director of Farm Institutes; Walter R. Harris of Kent 
Co. (standing) (Mr. Harris identified the year the picture 
was taken); Dr. H. J. Patterson, Director of Ext. Station; 
E. W. Silvester, President, M.A.C.; E. I. Oswald, County 
agent; Charles A. Councilman, Board of Trustees, M.A.C., 
Baltimore County; W. T. L. Taliafierre, Prof, of Agriculture, 
M.A.C.; A. D. Shamel, University of Illinois; G. Gittings 
Merryman (Sr.), member of Board of Trustees, M.A.C.; 
Weber of U.S.D.A.-B.P.I.; Dr. Joseph R. Owens, Registrar 
& Treasurer of M.A.C.; Litig, invited member of the group. 
According to Dr. T. B. Symons, the corn improvement 
trains were sent out by the Farm Institutes for the education 
of farmers. The Coach was owned by the Farm Institutes, 



University of Maryland, and went wherever there were trains. 
The farmers would come onto the train to see the exhibits, 
hear the lectures, and talk with the specialists and have their 
questions answered. 

This picture was found in the picture files of the Maryland 
& Rare Books Department, McKeldin Library. This Depart- 
ment is searching for materials of all kinds on both the Uni- 
versity and the State in order to build up a complete collec- 
tion for the State and the University Community. Anyone 
having such materials should contact: 

Howard Rovelstad. Director of Libraries. McKeldin Li- 
brary. University of Maryland. College Park. Maryland. Tel. 
WArfield 7-3800, x341, or Mrs. Harold Hayes. Librarian. 
Maryland & Rare Books Department. McKeldin Library, 
University of Maryland. College Park. Maryland. Tel. 
WArfield 7-3800, x666. 



July-August, 1960 



19 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 



H. Burton Shipley Retires 



Till Dl \s 01 M M<> I "iND'S i <>\< HI S, 
and long time friend ol the l ni- 
\crsii\. It Burton Shipley, was honored 
.it .1 testimonial dinner at the Statler 
Hotel M.i\ 19 as a tribute to him and 
Ins long tunc coaching tenure as he 
retired from the University. 

ship." as he is affectionately known 
throughout the athletic world, had just 
completed his 38th year as baseball 
coach ol the terrapins and over 400 
ol his former players and friends turned 
OUt to pa) tribute to the collegiate 
"grand old man of baseball." 



Shiple) started his coaching and 
teaching career tor Maryland in l ( >23. 
He was basketball and baseball coach. 
He coached the I erp court team through 
1947. 

At the "this is your life type" presen- 
tation at the banquet as Ship's career 
was brought to the huge screen in the 
room from birth until the present year, 
his wife Miriam and daughter joined 
in the happy moments. 

The many tributes he received from 
his former players and friends included 
a gift of a $1000 check: a commenda- 



tion as "Varsirj Baseball Coach Emer- 
itus of Maryland": a citation from 
Governor J. Millard Tawes as "Distin- 
guished Citizen of the State ol Mary- 
land"; and citations from the Atlantic 
( <>;ist Conference, the School of Physi- 
cal Education. Recreation, and Health, 
and the Athletic Council. 

Through it all. Shipley, for whom the 
University named its beautiful baseball 
field, beamed and wiped away an occa- 
sional tear. 



i wioi s iok "KKkiMi im (WATER) hi ( ki i.' Ship sees his habit memorialized by some of his admirers. Shown as they presented 
the bucket to Ship at the recent testimonial dinner are, 1. to r., President Elkins; Charlie "King Kong** Keller. Class of "38. former 
star of ihe New York Yankees; Ship: Bozie Berger. Class of 1932. All American basketball player: and Dr. H. C. "Curly" B\rd. 




Nugent Varsity 
Overpowers Alumni 



IN THE 1959 VERSION OF I HIS STORY, 
the headline was '"Alumni Oxer- 
power Nugent Varsity." In one year 
Coach Tom Nugent has caused that 
headline to be turned around; the Var- 
sitj team came up with an overwhelm- 
ing victory over the Alumni. Final 
score of the May 7 contest: Varsity 34, 
Alumni 6. 

There were 4,800 witnesses to the 
spectacular show of strength displayed 
by the Varsity at Byrd Stadium. The 
Terp team looked good on offense and 
was even better on defense. Although 
the Alumni rushed for 107 yards, they 
were beaten back 108 yards as the Var- 
sity ruined many pass attempts. In 
passing, the Alumni totaled 167 yards, 
the Varsity 1 16 yards. Most of the pass- 
ing gain made by the Alumni came 
late in the game when Coach Nugent 
sent in many of his reserves. He used 
all 4 C ) players who dressed for the game. 

The Alumni team used 52 players, 
29 of whom have played professional 



ball. They couldn't stop the Varsity, who 
had a 27-0 lead by the middle o\ the 
third period. It wasn't until the fourth 
period that the Alumni managed to 
score their one and only touchdown — 
and by then Coach Nugent had sent in 
his fourth line. 

One of the standout players of the 
game was Vinnic Scott, end, kicking 
two field goals, kicking for a conver- 
sion, catching a pass from Dick Novak, 
quarterback, and carrying it to the 
Alumni one-yard line. Novak completed 
seven passes in 14 attempts. Halfbacks 
Dennis Condie and Dwayne Fletcher 
carried the ball for one touchdown each 
and Gary Collins took a pass over the 
middle from Novak at the nine-yard 
line. 

The record for the series of Alumni- 
Varsity games now stands at seven for 
the Alumni, three for the Varsity. Pro- 
ceeds from the game, which is sponsored 
by the "M" Club, go into a scholarship 
fund for minor sports at the University. 





1 9 6 


Football Schedule 


Septembei 


17 West Virginia 




<// Morgantown 




24 Texas 




at ( 'ollege Park 


October 


1 Duke 




at College Park 




8 N( Stale 




at Raleigh (N) 




15 Clemson 




at College Park 




22 Wake Forest 




at Winston Salem 




29 South Carolina 




at College Park 


November 


5 Penn State 




at University Park 




12 North Carolina 




at Chapel Hill 




19 Virginia 




at Charlottesville 



Spring Sports Summary 



THE 1960 OUTDOOR SEASON WAS 
another successful one for Mary- 
land. Of the five sports, the Terps won 
two Conference championships, lacrosse 
and outdoor track. By winning two of 
the five championships, Maryland com- 
pleted the 1959-60 athletic year with 
six Conference championships to con- 
tinue dominance of winning titles in the 
A.C.C. Of the twelve recognized sports, 
the Terps, as mentioned, won six; North 
Carolina three; Duke 2; and Clemson I . 
The Terp titles were won by the fol- 
lowing teams: soccer, indoor and out- 
door track, swimming, wrestling and 
lacrosse. 

Jack Faber's lacrosse team had won 
seven and lost three. They were unde- 
feated in the Conference. 



Coach Shipley's baseball team had a 
fine season, inasmuch as the Terp pitch- 
ing staff had all sophomores and one 
non-letterman junior. They finished the 
season with a 9-9-1 record. Their con- 
ference record was 5-7. 

Coach Royal's tennis team won I 1 . 
lost two and tied one. Their record in 
the Conference was 5-2. In the Cham- 
pionships, Chuck Abelson reached the 
semi-finals. 

Coach Frank Cronin's golf team had 
a most successful year, winning 1 2 
matches and losing only two. In the 
A.C.C. the team won five and lost one. 
The season was played without the great 
star Deane Beman, who started to con- 
centrate on his academic work instead 



of taking the time to play the dual meets 
because of his missing some classes for 
the Masters Tournament. Beman did 
play in the A.C.C. Championship Meet 
and tied for the title. 

Coach Jim Kehoe's outdoor track 
team won its fifth consecutive outdoor 
title and its sixth of seven seasons. 
Again the team was undefeated in three 
dual meets, but lost a triangular match 
to Navy with Georgetown the third 
team. In the A.C.C. Championship Meet 
held in Byrd Stadium, the Terps won 
eight of the fifteen first place events. 
Coach Kehoe has several individuals 
who are Olympic hopefuls, in Nick 
Kovalakides. Bill Johnson. Butch Spie- 
gel and Bjorn Andersen. 



J itly- August, 1960 



21 



\(, RI< IJLTU RE 



I II Hamilton 



HkuW N Joins \ w \\ 

Di [rwin Frederick Brown h.is joined 
the planl science department oi I li 
I ill\ and ( ompany, Greenfield, Indiana. 
Brown received his Doctor oi Philoso- 
phy degree in planl pathology in Febru- 
ary, 

\i the l niversity ol Maryland he did 
research studies on the physiology ol 
fungi, assisted m planl pathology classes 
and during the summer oi 1959 he 
taught .1 class tor Weather Bureau per- 
sonnel. 

Brown, a native of Upper Darby, 
Pa., did his undergraduate study at the 
University ol Delaware. While in the 
l mied States Army he received ex- 
perience in working with fungi as a 
medical mycologist. 



Murphy Rkii\is Agronomy Award 

Raymond Murphy of Vienna. Md., re- 
ceived the American Society of Agron- 
omy's "Outstanding Senior in Agron- 
omy" award at the recent meeting of 
the University of Maryland Agronomy 
Club. 

Murphy is a senior in the College 
ol Agriculture and is majoring in soils 
in the Agronomy Department. He is a 
graduate of Vienna High School and 
served in the U. S. Navy from 1953 
to 1957. Murphy is a member of Alpha 
/eta. agricultural honorary fraternity. 
and has been active in the student 
Agronomy Club. 



Febry Chief of Agricultural 
Projects 

Arturo Febry. M.S. Agricultural Eco- 
nomics "51, is Chief of the Office oi 
Agricultural Projects in Puerto Rico's 
"Operation Bootstrap" development pro- 
gram. Febry is located at the [Economic 
Development Administration. Santurce, 
Puerto Rico. 



Crii s i\ Al i<() Space 

Donald Gies, '48, is attached to the 
Aero Space Division, Boeing Airplane 
Company, long Island. N. Y. After a 

hitch in the Air Corps, Don received a 
degree in mechanical engineering. His 
primary duties relate to the training ol 
G.I.'s in the use of new equipment 



Ji si i k o\ ( ri di i Board 

Mi W ( layton Jester. '21. of Bigler- 
ville. Pa., was re-elected to the I arm- 

( u-dit Board ol Baltimore by the Fed- 
eral I and Bank Associations tor a third 
3-year term. Mr. Jester operates a large 
dairy farm and also serves as a director 

ol the MB\ ol York ( ounty. 



Brow n m Ii i tNOIS 

R. I Brown. '48, was featured in the 
Illinois Research magazine's spring issue. 

Dr. Brown teamed up with Dr. ( . I 
Davis and developed an apparatus to 
keep a cow's rumen functioning after 
it has been removed from the animal. 
I his apparatus makes it possible to test 
the "fuel value of feeds for ruminants." 

To study the rates at which organic 
acids are produced and absorbed in 
ruminants, we have developed a way of 
removing the rumen and keeping it 
functioning outside the animal. This 
way. we eliminate the complications 
caused by the dilution of the rumen 
contents with water or saliva, and by 
the passage of rumen contents into the 
lower gut. 

One hour after receiving a test diet, 
the animal is anaesthetized and bled-out. 
The rumen is quickly removed and tied 
off at both the inlet and outlet so that 
none of the contents can get out except 
by absorption into the circulating blood. 
Tubes are placed in the rumen artery 
and vein, and blood is perfused or 
forced through the blood vessels. The 
rumen is suspended in a thermostatically 
controlled water bath at body tempera- 
ture. 

Under these conditions, the test meal 
in the rumen is fermented normally. 
Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids 
produced during fermentation accumu- 
late in the rumen, and some of the acids 
are absorbed into the blood. The amount 
of each acid absorbed can be calculated 
from the difference between the con- 
centrations in the blood before it enters 
and after it leaves the rumen. The acid 
production rate can be determined from 
the absorption rate and the amount of 
acid accumulated in the rumen during 
the perfusion. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Stall of the College 



M \K 1 1 El I ( i id I - 1 - 1 i o\\ 

Herman M.uil. Professor o\ Art and 
well-known painter, has been elected a 
I ile Fellow by the Council oi the In- 



ternational Institute of Arts and Letters. 

The membership is limited to 760 Pel- 
lows and corresponding members who 
are "qualified In notable achievements 
in Arts and letters or in Sciences and 
other fields of Culture." Mr. Maril's 
work has been receiving increasing 
attention in the past few sears. His 
work is represented in many collections 
in this countrv and abroad. 



FACUI TV Al'I'OIN I Ml MS 

Two new appointments to the faculty 
were announced recently by the Board 
of Regents. 

Dr. Vladimir J. Glaser, an eminent 
theoretical Italian phvsicist. who has 
been one of the leading members of the 
theoretical division of the Central Euro- 
pean Laboratory of Nuclear Research 
near Geneva, Switzerland, was appoint- 
ed Professor in the Department of 
Physics. A native of Gorizia, Italy. Dr. 
Glaser is one of the world's outstanding 
experts in quantum field theory, and in 
collaboration with German physicists 
Lehmann and Zimmermann. he has de- 
veloped one of the most promising ap- 
proaches to a rigorous field theory for 
elementary particles. In addition, he is 
an expert on some of the simplified 
models for particle theory. 

Dr. Bernard R. Jerman. Associate 
Professor of English at Pennsylvania 
State University, was appointed Asso- 
ciate Professor of English in the De- 
partment of English. Dr. Jerman holds 
B.A.. M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from 
Ohio State University. Prior to his 
appointment to the Pennsylvania State 
University faculty in 1952. he was a 
member of the faculties of Ohio State 
University and the University of Ken- 
tucky. Dr. Jerman is currently writing 
a book entitled The Young Disraeli. 



Chemistry Depar rMENI 

More than 500 scientists from the State 
of Maryland. Washington. D. C. and 
Virginia met on May 6 at the Univer- 
sity oi Maryland to hear presentations 
on the most recent advances in chem- 
istry. A total of 53 research papers in 
physical, organic, and analytical chem- 
istrv ; biochemistry; and industrial and 
engineering chemistry were presented 
by leading research scientists during the 
one-day meeting. The Washington and 
Marvland Sections of the American 
Chemical Society were joint sponsors 
of the program. 

A National Science Foundation grant 
oi $22,400 received by the Department 
of Chemistry will enable a research 
team to continue their study of the 
physical structure and bonding charac- 
teristics of molecules in unusual com- 
pounds. According to Dr. Ellis R. I.ip- 
pincott. director of the project: '"From 



22 



i he Maryland Magazine 



the study ol molecular motion in COm- 
pounds, a is sometimes possible to 
deduce information concerning the exacl 
shape ol the molecules, .is well .is the 

bonding characteristics which hold the 

compounds together." 



Algae and Space Research 

The physiology of algae and the "man 
in space" projects have an important 

relationship which is being explored in 
the Department of Botany 

Since h>4 1 ). Dr. Robert \Y. Krauss 
has been directing fundamental research 
into the physiology of algae. Continuing 
research will be supported by a grant 
Ol $216,000 from the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration. 

The importance of algaeic metabolism 
and growth to a man in space, accord- 
ing to Dr. Krauss. is their ability to 
liberate oxygen and to absorb and re- 
duce carbon dioxide. 

All of the oxygen breathed by man- 
kind daily, he continued, has been lib- 
erated by plants through photosynthesis. 
It is possible that tor long trips in space 
or for bases on other planets man will 
need to survive in a closed chamber 
which is made as self sufficient as 
possible. 

"If plants are to be employed in such 
a system they will need to be capable 
of rapid rates of growth and high rates 
of oxygen evolution. Furthermore they 
will need to be grown in very compact 
apparatus in the absence of soil and 
be susceptible to handling in apparatus 
more familiar to the chemical engineer 
than to traditional agriculturists. The 
algae uniquely fit these requirements so 
that if it becomes necessary for man to 
carry plants with him into space the 
algae are the most promising," Dr. 
Krauss said. 

"A second characteristic of algae," 
he explained, "has been their remark- 
ably high nutritive value. Experiments 
carried jointly with the National Insti- 
tutes of Health have shown that the 
amino acid complement of certain algae 
is unrivaled among single sources in its 
nutritive value. In spite of the obvious 
requirements for adequate processing to 
make the algae suitable for human con- 
sumption, these organisms are a most 
promising source of protein. This fact 
adds much to the feasibility of using 
the algae to supplement the diets of 
space travelers." 

Dr. Krauss has emphasized, however, 
ihat our knowledge of fundamental 
facts concerning the algae is not yet 
adequate for a satisfactory evaluation 
of their future role in space vehicles. 

"Common with other sciences, studies 
of the basic nature of these organisms 
has not been exhaustive enough to pro- 
vide the engineers and scientists with 
sufficient information to assess their 



practical use I 01 this reason the studies 

at the University ol Maryland will be 
directed toward adding u> our store ol 

information regarding the lund.uiient.il 

biochemistry, and growth characters 

ties ol a number ol selected strains ol 
algae rather than toward the design ol 

apparatus for possible use in space," he 

concluded. 



PROMO! ion WD I K WSI I R 

Dr. Ward Pigman, Ph.D. '36, has been 
appointed Professor of Biochemistry at 

New York Medical College. Dr. Pig- 
man has been an Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry at the University of Ala- 
bama Medical College. 



Russian Theatre 

A "Russian literary evening" of Russian 
theatre arts was presented on May 16 
by Mme. Boborykine's students of Rus- 
sian. "The Voice of America," which 
sent a representative to the perform- 
ance, reported subsequently on the 
students acting in Russian as if it were 
their native tongue. 

To honor the centenary of the birth 
of Chekhov, a play of his called Ladies 
was presented. Mr. Charles N. Lee, In- 
structor of Russian, made introductory 
remarks about Chekhov. The program 
also included a modern skit satirizing 
the housing shortage, Nervous People 
by Il'f and Petrov, a well-known bala- 
leika player Grisha Titoff, accompanied 
by Maryland alumna Anya Barclay, 
and a Ukrainian dance "Hopack" per- 
formed by Jeanne and David Bird. 



Microbiology Notes 

Dr. P. Arne Hansen, Professor of Mi- 
crobiology, attended a joint meeting of 
the Virginia Academy of Science and 
the Virginia Branch, Society of Amer- 
ican Bacteriologists, on May 12-13 at 
Richmond, Virginia. 

Dr. Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., Professor 
of Microbiology, attended a meeting of 
the Committee on University Relations 
at the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear 
Studies, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on May 
15-16. Dr. Pelczar is ORINS Councillor 
for the University of Maryland. 

Mr. Walter R. Dowdle, Research 
Assistant, has accepted a position as 
medical bacteriologist at the Commu- 
nicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Geor- 
gia. Mr. Dowdle will be assigned to the 
Virus and Rickettsial Section of CDC 
and expects to begin his new assign- 
ment on August 1st. 

Mr. Noel R. Krieg, Graduate Assist- 
ant, has accepted a position as Assistant 
Professor of Bacteriology at Virginia 



Polytechnic Institute. Blacksburg Vii 
ginia, effective September I, I960 Mi 

I ddie ( S. < ban. Graduute Assistant, 

has been aw.uded a PostdOCtOratC I el 
lOWShip tenable hi the ( .m.ul.i Dep.ut 

nient oi Agriculture at Ottawa to work 
on microbial interaction related to nu 
trition biosynthesis, metabolism, ["his 
I ellowship was awarded in the \.i 
tional Research < ouncil ol ( anada ami 
Mi ( ban looks forward to beginning 

his new duties on JuK 1st 



From i hi Mi m< Di pari mini 

I he Music Department recently dispo- 
sessed by a lire is now firmly re-estab- 
lished in the completely renovated old 

music building and will be holding forth 
there during the coming year. 

The department is pleased to an- 
nounce the appointment ol the brilliant 
young pianist. Stewart Cordon, to the 
faculty. Mr. Cordon, w ho has a Bach- 
elor and Master's degree from Kansas 
University, was a pupil ol Walter 
Gieseking. He has performed extensive- 
ly in Europe ami the United States and 
made several recordings lor Washing- 
ton Records. He has been chairman ol 
the department for three years at Wil- 
mington College in Ohio. 

The Eastern Division of the Music 
Educators National Conference will 
hold some of its sessions at the College 
Park Campus. The group will be on 
campus on January 13th and will fea- 
ture the All-Maryland Band. Chorus 
and Orchestra. 



German Culture Evaluated 

The Federal Republic of Germany has 
invited Dr. Augustus J. Prahl, Profes- 
sor of Foreign Languages and Associate 
Dean of the Graduate School, to visit 
Germany from June 12-July 1 I in order 
to evaluate its present-day cultural 
activities in the universities, art, music, 
opera, and theatre. The purpose of the 
mission is to gather insight into the 
present status of West German culture 
for an exchange of ideas at the uni\er- 
sity and administrative level. 



Alliance Francaise 

A branch of the Alliance Francaise 
was founded at the University of Mary- 
land this past year, under the auspices 
of Professor Wm. F. Falls and Mr. Leo 
R. Lemaire. The "Cercle Universitaire 
Francais" conducted its meetings en- 
tirely in French. In the course of the 
year Prof. Falls gave a talk on Duhamel. 
Mme. Floershcim, of the French Em- 
bassy, spoke on Albert Camus, and 

(Continued on next page) 



J uly- August, 1960 



23 




ith 



Why don't you 

Talk 

Westinghouse 

about 

TYPHON and 

other Advanced 

Electronic 

Projects 




WESTINGHOUSE-BALTIMORE 
has the challenging projects 
and advanced research on 
which engineering careers 
thrive . . . combined with the 
finest of facilities and an 
engineer-oriented management 
policy. Technological break- 
throughs in Molecular 
Engineering, 3-dimensional 
radar, Missile Guidance and 
other space age electronic 
programs have created 
outstanding openings for 
creative engineers. 

CALL 

SOuthfield l-lOOO 

Ext. 657 or 

SEND YOUR RESUME TO 

Mr. A. M. Johnston, 

Dcpt. .in" 

Westinghouse 

BALTIMORE 

P. O. Box 746 Baltimore 3, Maryland 
AIR ARM . ELECTRONICS • ORDNANCE 



Professor I e Moal >>i the l niversirj 
ol Poitien France, discussed academic 
life in contemporary I ranee. Sessions 
were also held on Algeria and Vietnam. 
Undergraduate and graduate students 
participated. 

I he Circle extends a welcome to 
students and friends tor its 1960-61 
season. 



Morgan s i \ i i Colleoi ( ovi i ri n< i 

Dr. Jean V. Alter ot our French stall 
spoke on "The lost Hero in the Mod- 
ern Society" tor a conference held on 

\la\ 4 and 5 at Morgan State College. 

I he conference on 'Technology and 

the Humanities" explored the relations 
ol the humanities to other aspects ol 
contemporary civilization. Distinguished 
scholars from Harvard, Yale. Howard, 
and other institutions participated in 
the meetings sponsored b\ Morgan 
State College's Division ot the Human- 
ities and its Student Union. 



Book Review 

Professor Alfred Bingham has reviewed 
An Aye of Crisis. Lester G. (rocker's 
important studs of ethics in eighteenth- 
century F-'rance. The review is sched- 
uled to appear in a forthcoming issue ol 
The .Veil- Scholasticism. 



Tape-recording 

Professor Leonora C. Rosenfield recent- 
ly tape-recorded a half-hour's talk for 
the Opinion Institute oi Omaha. Ne- 
braska. This Institute is putting on the 
market as records or tapes a series ol 
lectures and interviews on government, 
religion and education. " 'From Presi- 
dential Candidates to Professors' might 
be the sub-title of their catalogue." com- 
mented Mrs. Rosentield. 



F.L.E.S. 

Mr. Leo R. I.emaire. instructor of 
French and German, participated in the 
Annual Workshop o\ the Maryland 
Association of Elementary School Prin- 
cipals held in Annapolis on April 30. 
"Should We Provide a Program ol 
Foreign Language in the Elementary 
School'" was the topic of the panel in 
which Mr. I eniaire spoke. I he other 
participants were Dr. Hleue. Maryland 
Superintendent o\ Foreign Languages, 
and Dr. Struttenmeyer from the State 
Board ol Education. 




So Good in GLASS! 

Milk and other beverages for 
5fOUB family taste better— fresh 
and wholesome — when served in 



GLASS BOTTLES 

You can SEE the Quality and 
Quantity you are receiving. 



INSIST ON GLASS BOTTLES 

No toss or Contamination of 
Flavor 



LEAKPROOF — SPARKLING 
TRANSPARENT 

1 III BUCK GLASS 
COMPANY 

FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 
Baltimore 30, Md. 

Orif/inators of the Square 
Milk Bottle 



Look for the Sign 




v . rving Baltimore's Fit ■ 
Italian Cuisine 

Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

300 Albermarle St. MU 5-2811 

Baltimore 2, Md. MU 5-2612 



24 



thi Marvi \\n Mxgazine 



\.nis Prom i hi Di par i mi \ i hi 

I \(,1 ISII 



I'u-lessoi Carl Bode Ol (ho IVp.u lincnl 

of English h.is given sixteen talks, read 
ings and television lectures during the 
past academic year. Mam ot the re- 
quests for Professor Bode have reflected 

interest in his experience as cultural 
attache at the American Embassj in 
London from [957 to 1959 and Ins 
authorship of a widelj acclaimed vol- 
ume of poetry published this year in 
both London and New York. Dr. Bode 
has lectured at the All Souls Unitarian 
Church in Washington, the Cosmos 
C lub, the Campus Club of the Univer- 
sit\ oi Maryland, the Enoch Pratt 
I ibrary in Baltimore, the Howard 
( ounty Teachers Forum, the Prince 
Georges High School Seminar, the 
Poetrj Ciroup of the Jewish Commu- 
nity Center in Washington, the Oxon 
H ill Chapter ot the AAUW. and Kent 
State University in Ohio. He gave tele- 
vision talks from the ABC station in 
Baltimore on H. L. Mencken and H. 
D. Thoreau. 

In April Dr. Bode was the guest of 
honor at a party given in New York by 
PEN, the international writers' organ- 
ization, on the occasion of the publica- 
tion of the American edition of his 
volume of poems. The Man Behind 
You. He was also invited to make a 
recording of some of his poems for the 
Library of Congress record series of 
contemporary American poets. 

Professor A. O. Aldridge of the De- 
partment of English has received a 
travel grant from the American Coun- 
cil of Learned Societies to attend the 
Eighth Congress of the International 
Federation for Modern Languages and 
Literature at Liege, Belgium, from 
August 28 to September 3. Dr. Aldridge 
will deliver a paper to the Congress on 
"Problems of Translation in the Eight- 
eenth Century and Today." 

Two authors of recent scholarly books 
will enter the Department of English at 
professorial rank in September, 1960. 
Dr. Bernard Jerman will come from 
Pennsylvania State University to be an 
associate professor at College Park. Dr. 
Jerman, author of a biographical and 
critical study of Disraeli published in 
June by the Princeton University Press, 
will give courses in Victorian literature. 
Dr. Robert Manson Myers, author of 
two books on the relations of literature 
and music in the eighteenth century 
composer Handel and also of a parody 
history of English literature published 
in both New York and London, will 
be an assistant professor and is sched- 
uled to teach advanced courses in writ- 
ing. 

(Continued on next page) 




BUILDS 
AN 

ELECTRONIC 

FORT 

McHENRY 



fk. T ^7 




The famous "Star Fort" built and manned by Marylanders repelled an invasion 
fleet powerful enough to crush the great Napoleon. One hundred fifty years later, 
the Fort is the serene shrine of a nation facing the menace of nuclear submarines 
and hypersonic missiles. That is why The Martin Company is devoting a major 
portion of its facilities and resources toward the development and production of 
electronic systems for submarine detection . . . coordination and control of anti- 
aircraft missile batteries . . . missile checkout, guidance and control ...and other 
vital military requirements for defending the Homeland of the Free. 



THE MARTIN COMPANY 

CORPORATE OFFICES • BALTIMORE 3, MARYLAND 



J uly- August, 1960 



25 



warded annually to a 

lior student majoring in 

•i endowed in mem- 

\; tbramowitz who, at the 

nun leath in 1959, u^ .1 matb- 

lician on the itafl ol iIk- National 

Bureau ol Standards. 

I he award will be made to tin.- rtu- 
denl who has demonstrated superior 
competence and promise lor future de- 
velopment in the field ol mathematics 
and lis applications, I nder the condi- 
tions ol the gift the winner ol the prize 
will be selected from candidates iden- 
tified in a committee ol undergraduate 
studies ol the Department ol Mathe- 
matics I lie selection committee will 
consist ol a chairman chosen b) the 
chief, applied mathematics division, Na- 
tional Bureau ol Standards and two 
members Ol the Department ol Mathe- 
matics 



\\ll Kl( \\ KlIllMI ON ( IIINA 

Maryland was host to the annual round- 
table conference on cultural relations 
between the United States and Free 
( hma. American Cultural Influences 

on ( hma" was the theme oi the meet- 
ing held on Ma) 13. Mr. ('. C. (hen 
ol our Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages lectured on Chinese literature 
at the conference, which was attended 
In leading Chinese and American 
scholars. 

I he conference was sponsored by the 
I niversirj ol Maryland, China Insti- 
tute in America. Association of Teach- 
ers of Chinese language and Culture 
in American Colleges and Universities, 
and the Sino-American Cultural Com- 
mittee. 



KNOW 
HOW 



I he general subject was sub-diuded 
into panels on religion, science, medi- 
cine, agriculture, and libraries. 




WANT 



THE MAURICE LEESER CO. 

VICTOR P. SKIUCK, f mU t n t 

Creative Printers and Lithographers 

536 W. MATT ST. • BAMMOtt 1, MO. 
SAIATOOA 7-4444 



( 'ollege <>f 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 




Mr. Brown 



Brown Completes Course 

Philip C. Brown. '59. recently complet- 
ed the officers" basic course at the Ma- 
rine Corps School. Quantico. Virginia. 



C oi t ege Praised for Safety 
Program 

The College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration was highly commended re- 
cently by the National Committee for 
Motor Fleet Supervisor Training for 
its outstanding contribution to highway 
safety and driver improvement through 
sponsorship oi annual one-week super- 
visor training programs. The 13th Pro- 
gram was given April 4-8 at College 
Park in cooperation with national and 
local sponsoring agencies. 

Richard O. Bennett, of Washington, 

I). (.. Chairman of the National Com- 



Thomas & Thompson Co. 

The Downtown 
Prescription Drug Store 

Have Your Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded by 

PERSCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

at Baltimore and Light Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

— Delivery Service — 

TELEPHONE 

SAratoga 7-2960 



r~ 




BLACKIE 



fjouuofQwfe 



1217- 22nd STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



m 



BRIGGS 

Construction Co., Inc. 

CUSTOM HOMES 

Repairs - Remodeling 

BETHESDA. MD. OL 6-4545 



SI11ITH UlELDinC 

COMPANY 



PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

Phone UNion 4-1611 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 

Hyattsville, Md. 





American Disinfectant Co. 






Pest Control Service 






928 EYE STREET. N.W. 






Washington 1. D. C. NAtional 8-6478 





26 



T H B M ARYI.AND MAGAZINE 



mittee, which is headquartered at the 
Institute of Public Safety, Pennsylvania 
State University, praised the College 
and cooperating specialists for recog 
nizing the need for practical training 
of motor licet supervisors, and doing 
something about it. 

"Courses such as the ones given at 
the University of Maryland," he said, 
"have been carefully developed over a 
long period of years by the National 
Committee working with leading licet 
Operators and driver training specialists. 

I hes arc designed to help supervisors 
>.\o their job better, and experience has 
shown that attendance at similar courses 
has saved thousands of dollars tor oper- 
ators, won awards lor accident-tree 
highway operation, cut insurance costs. 
and improved employee morale." 

The University oi Maryland's course 
was planned by an Advisory Committee 
headed by Jay I. Davidson, of Balti- 
more, and included widely known 
trucking, safety and government lead- 
ers from all parts of the State, and 
University officials, headed by Dr. J. 
Freeman Pyle, Dean of the College of 
Business and Public Administration. 
National leaders in motor vehicle opera- 
tions, safety, and government regulation 
as well as University faculty members 
accepted appointment as instructors. 

Governor J. Millard Tawes presented 
Graduation Certificates to all enrollees 
who completed the requirements at the 
Certification Luncheon in April. Herbert 
Quails, Director of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission's Bureau of Motor 
Carriers, was the guest speaker. 



Finci Heads Personnel 

Michael Finci, '57, has been appointed 
Personnel Manager for the chain of 
Drug Fair stores in the Washington, 
D. C, area. 



Lt. Col. Fishburne at Pentagon 

Lt. Col. Charles C. Fishburne, who 
earned a master's degree from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in government and 
politics, was recently assigned new duties 
at the Pentagon in the International 
Affairs Division of the Directorate of 
Plans. Lt. Col. Fishburne was, for the 
past three years, Professor of Air 
Science at the University of Vermont. 



Hoffman Overseas 

R. W. Hoffman, class of 1954, has be- 
gun duties in Travelers Check Promo- 
tion (overseas) at the American Express 
Company, Inc. in New York City. 

Mr. Hoffman joined American Ex- 
press in 1955 as a foreign service train- 
ee. He was sent to Japan and Pakistan 
before assuming his new duties. 







. 


1 






I 




. 






' 






.-. 


.X 



Architect's Drawing- 



CAMBRIDGE HALL 

—UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FREDERICK CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 



615 NORTH MARKET ST. 



FREDERICK, MD. 



MO 2-4104 




FEEDS 

SEEDS 

FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



( Feed MO 3-3113 

FREDERICK \ 

I Petroleum MO 3-5422 
THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 



First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 




CREOSOTED 
PRODUCTS 

— Telephones — 

PI 2-2144— PI 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

Every kind of Insurance 

110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 


Distributors 


Shell Petroleum Products 


Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 


FREDERICK, MD. 



July-August, 1960 



27 



traveling from Ocean 

nd to Rehoboth Beach. 

; find the new look tor 

iimIcn and miles .in the) scan over this 

fabulous area ol the eatl ^'..st New 

hotels, motel* and apartment houses 

which have been completed during the 

.ids. r.mk among the finest 

on the eastern seaboard I hen. too, at 

n ( us visitors will find .1 new -i 1 r- 

port with daily service to the principal 

Lilies Ol the east as well as a new goll 

course Most ol the better hotels, motels 
and apartment houses have memberships 

foi their guests. 

I he entire heath along this stretch is 

beautiful and even the old buildings are 



ADVANCE 
-> FUR SALE 




Ant a m n 
Mini: Coat 



MANO SWARTZ 



225 N Howard St. 
Baltimore 1 , Maryland 



shimmering in tresh coals of paint as 
the summer visitors swoop down on this 
resort area to enjov summer vacations. 

\inong the new motels at Ocean 

( it) is HARRINGTON \K\ls. direct- 
Iv on the ocean at 2 c >th Street I here 
are SI apartments and rooms, all with 
private porches, wall to wall carpeting, 
beautiful decor; large and spacious liv- 
ing rooms with kitchen and dining room 
combinations. I here is plent) Ol park- 
ing facilities for guests. 

( lordon, Philip and William Harring- 
ton are the owners and operators. The 
Harringtons also operate the Harrington 
Apartments at 1 9th and Baltimore Ave- 
nue, which was opened to the public 
two vears ago. I he Harrington brothers 
hail from Indiana and their know-how 
ol construction, decorating and versatil- 
ity is among the best in this resort area. 



The SPANISH MAIN HOTEL at 
14th Street and the Ba) is a new fire- 
proof, deluxe efficiency apartment build- 
ing tor vear round occupancy. Located 
on the Bay. these apartments are the 
ultimate in comfort and luxury. There is 
clocking facilities at the door, all linens 
and utilities are provided. I here is air 
conditioning and heat, private porches 
and telephones in every apartment. 

Harry and Gerry Kellum are the 
owners and managers and your comfort 
is assured it vour vacation is to be spent 
as their guests. Mr. Kellum is a sports- 
man of note and Mrs. Kellum a former 
nurse — both very interesting. 



NORTH WINDS MOTEL, which was 
built several seasons ago. has been com- 
pletely redecorated and newly furnished 
tor the arrival of their summer visitors. 
Located at 55th street and Ocean High- 
way . it is a modern, two-story court 
with a friendly atmosphere in an uncon- 
tested area — yet it is near to restaurants, 
stores, churches and amusements. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Townsend are 
the owners-managers and they provide 
a swimming pool, telephones, maid ser- 
vice, and a bath house for the use of 



# 



a* 



PRINCt GEORSB PINEJT MEN'5 WEAR JTORE 



6033 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 
Oobbs Hots • Bostonion Shoes 
Baltimore Blvd. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 
UNion 4-1312 



MgAmIgmA 



the guests on a guarded beach. I here 
are one and two bedroom apartments 
..i North W inds Motel. 



I he [SLANDER is one ol Ocean 
( itv's newer efficiency apartments and 
motel. It has the ocean and the bav 
view from its location at Philadelphia 
Avenue and 20lh Street. It oilers a 
temperature-controlled swimming pool. 
and free dock for the deep sea anglers. 
Bill Weaver, who also operates the 
Alamo Motel on Route 50, on the 
approach to Ocean City . is the owner- 
manager. Verv fine accommodations. 



WESTWARD HO Motel and Apart- 
ments invites vou to a wonderful new 
world of informal vacation living. There 
ire golfing privileges at the new golf 
course, putting greens, swimming pool, 
outdoor cooking facilities, playground 
tor children, boating, fishing and free 
boat docking. 

Located at Beach Highway and 23rd 
Street, everything is easily accessible for 
the summer visitor. 



The ROOSEVELT HOTEL, owned 
and operated by Mr. and Mrs. E. F. 
Fleming, has a homey atmosphere. It 
is located close to all of the activities 
on the beach and is a pleasant place to 
relax and enjoy a prolonged vacation. 
The Roosevelt, over the vears. has been 
a favorite of many Baltimoreans. Mr 
and Mrs. Fleming also operated the 
Sun and Sea Motel — Apartments on the 
Beach at 27th Street. 



HOLIDAY HOUSE. 8th Street at the 
Boardwalk, overlooking the ocean, has 
been completely renovated for thi^ 
son's visitors. It is a small, spotless!) 
clean hotel that is owned and operated 
by Nicholas and Roberta Brous. who 
are from Catonsville. Maryland. Thev 
have operated Holiday House for the 
past four years. 

Each room has telephones and all 
modern conveniences — guests are privi- 
leged to go bathing from their rooms. 
I he Hotels slogan is "The Toast of the 
(oast." Holiday House is open through 
September — a delightful small hotel. 



The M AR1DEL MOTEL on Philadel- 
phia Avenue at 41st Street and Beach 



2S 



the Maryland Magazine 



Wi 



amen 



Highway is on the Bay overlooking the 

Atlantic Ocean. Mr. A. Percy Holland 
is the owner-manager. The motel is 
located away from the crowds where 
guests can enjoy a quiet, peaceful holi- 
day in serenity, and yet enjoy both the 
ocean and the ba\ . 



The HOTEL LANK FORD, operated 
by Miss Mary B. Quillen, is on the 
Boardwalk between Sth and 4th Streets. 
It is one of the older hotels but it is 
a comfortable. European plan establish- 
ment that guests return to year after 
year. Miss Quillen personally supervises 
the hotel and this charming little lady 
is always on hand. 



The SALTY SANDS MOTEL at 

46th Street at Ocean Front is new. Every 
room and efficiency apartment has a 
view of the ocean and each has its own 
large porch. There is a private guarded 
beach and surf fishing. The Salty Sands 
provides maid service and, like all o\ 
the better hotels and motels on the 
beach, there is golf course privileges 
available. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Rost, Jr.. 
are the owners and managers. 

At Fenwick Island, Delaware, the 
SEA CHARM APARTMENTS make 
their first appearance this season. Just 
completed on the ocean there stands 
10 luxury apartments, some one-bed- 
room and efficiencies. 

The building is sound proof — it is 
furnished in excellent taste with wall to 
wall carpeting and fully equipped kitch- 
ens even to silver and linens. 

Mr. and Mrs. Orlando Lewis are the 
owners-managers and Sea Charm is lo- 
cated on State Highway directly east of 
the Light House on Fenwick Island. 
There is a beautiful view of the ocean 
from each apartment as well as a view 
of the bay. There is a guarded beach 
and plenty of parking space. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis are experienced 
motel operators, having had many years 
of experience in Ocean City, Maryland. 



The DINNER BELL INN at Reho- 
both Beach, Delaware, located at the 
corner of First Street and Christian, has 
in the past year added, for its guests, 
motel facilities which are attractive and 
modern. They are heated and air con- 
ditioned for year 'round accommoda- 
tions. 



I his famous restaurant operates the 
year 'round and its reputation is oul 
standing. Summer guests lill the place 
to the overflowing and these same 

guests will drive lor miles during the 

long winter months to enjoy a Sunday 

dinner at I he Dinner Bell Inn. 

Established in 1937, I he Dinner Bell 
is owned and operated by Mrs. Ruth I 
Emmert and her son. David. I here are 
facilities for large groups and the 
I inmerts cater to parties. 



Another outstanding (.lining room in 
Rehoboth Beach is BOB CHING'S 

WHITE CHIMNEY INN. located di- 
rectly behind City Hall. Here one can 
enjoy superb food at its best. 

Bob Ching is well known to Ocean 
City visitors, having operated the Bob 
Ching Restaurant in that city for a 
number of years. His White Chimney 
Inn was opened during the summer of 
1959 and enjoyed a very successful sea- 
son. Mr. Ching will operate throughout 
the year in his new establishment. Bob 
Ching's at Ocean City has been closed. 



JOSIE & MARIA'S is without doubt 
the most outstanding restaurant and 
supper club in Ocean City, Maryland. 
Located on Philadelphia Avenue and 
17th Street, it has created quite a name 
for itself. The firm operates another din- 
ing room at 7 Caroline Street. This is a 
mother-daughter combination with a 
"know-how" in restaurant operation. 

The food in both places, featuring 
Italian-American cuisine, is superb in 
every detail and a "must" in anyone's 
schedule for good dining in the resort 
area. There is continuous entertainment 
at the Supper club and 1960 guests will 
be entertained by outstanding artists. 
Both restaurants are air conditioned and 
there is plenty of parking space at the 
supper club. 



Among the gay night life establish- 
ments at Rehoboth Beach, there is none 
as popular as the PINK PONY COCK- 
TAIL LOUNGE NIGHT CLUB, lo- 
cated at Olive Avenue on the Board- 
walk. Its owners are Teddy Navakowski 
and Jimmy Booth. They are the former 
owners of the Shaker Lounge and well 
known to the summer vacationer. 

There is nightly entertainment by top 
artists, and dancing in a pleasant atmos- 
phere of Little Pink Ponys that appear 
in the decor all over the place. It's a 
pleasant environment to spend an even- 
ing. Please call for reservations. 



Driving south from Rehoboth Beach 
to Ocean City, Maryland, there is an 
exotic and interesting restaurant and 
bar. It is called THE BOAT HOUSE 




i 
I 

1 



KSlJr</<'fv</(</' 



On the Eastern Shore 
MARYLAND S FINEST 

124 ROOMS 
< OLONIAL in SICN 

I IIU.I'Uooi 
\IK < ONDITION1 l) 

Dining Room — Cocktail Lounge 
and facilities for private parties 

./ short drive from Baltimore and 
II ashington for luxut io 



OPEN YEAR ROUND 



Arthur J. Grymes, Jr. 
Ownei \ l : i 

1 TA 2-1300 Easton, Md. 

H 

H @n©gH!BHHBHUHH@a@@ii |S 'g'^| 



H 



52 52525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252 52 



OPEN ALL YEAR 

WESTWARD, HO! 

MOTEL APARTMENTS 



• Potting Greens 

• Tennis Courts 

• Docking Facilities 

• Swimming Pool 

Beach Highway at 23rd St. 

OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 

ATlantic 9-7111 



52 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 
5P 
52 
52 
52 






5? 



525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252 



^Jh c *y$ lane I ci ' 



ooin.s 



(L.niciencu ^J4pls. - /\i 



OCEAN AND BAY VIEW 

Philadelphia Ave. at 20th St. 

OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 

TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED SWIMMING 
POOL - TV AVAUABtE - FREE DOCK 

Tels. ATlantic 9-9179 
ATlantic 9-7558 



July- August, 1960 



29 



#M 



Ma/uflawd lOameM, 



and is owned and operated b) the ( 
Pearce <■ oadys li is located on Reho- 
both n.is .ii Dewej Beach, Delaware. 

I his restaurant is designed lor those 



Sea GUaSim 
AfLatitme+iti 



FENWICK ISLAND'S NEWEST 

— Ju»t Completed — 

On The OCEAN 
10 LUXURY APARTMENTS 10 

1 -Bedroom and Efficiencies 
Completely Furnished 

• Wall to wall carpeting 

• Soundproof 

Wired for Television and 
Telephone 

— Guarded Beach — 

Now Renting — Week, Month or Season 

Directly East of the Light House 

on Fenwick Island, Del. 



oi a n h to rcl 

OCEAN CITY. HD. 

BETWEEN 8th and 9th 

On Boardwalk 

Mgr. Mary B. Ouillen AT. 9-7970 



BOB CHING'S 
WHITE CHIMNEY INN 

Rehoboth Beach, Del. 

Directly Behind City Hall 

Ocean City Fame 

Chinese and American 

Cuisine 

Cocktails — Rooms 

Open all Year 

Phone: 7331 



who prefer dining in a Inendh relaxed 
atmosphere, uith a view ol the water. 
I he Coadys, who also own and op- 
erate the Bluff House Inn. Green Turtle 
( ay, Abaco, in the Bahamas, have an 
art ol serving superior food in an atmos- 
phere ol charm, complimenting an 
ocean resort. 

* * ♦ 

PHILLIPS ( RAB HOUSE at Phila- 
delphia Avenue near 20th Street, that 
enjoyed such a splendid season in 1959 
has found it necessary to enlarge the 
restaurant to accommodate their trade 
— now a carry-out section has been 
added. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brice Phillips own and 
operate this seafood restaurant and they 
can truly boast of their fine cuisine. 

* * * 

VILLAN1 REALTY COMPANY at 

63rd Street and Beach Highway is hav- 
ing a busy season with summer visitors 
investing in shore property. The firm 
handles commercial and residential 
property sales and rentals. 

With 35 years of experience in beach 
property. Mr. and Mrs. Angelo M. 
Villani have been able to give Eastern 
Shore property owners the best values 
through their years of experience. Mr. 
Villani also operated the Villani Furni- 
ture Company and the Villa Nova cot- 
tages and apartments at West Ocean 

The TIDEWATER INN on the East- 
ern Shore of Maryland in Easton is a 
favorite of many Baltimoreans and 
Washingtonians all through the year. 
Just a pleasant drive over the Bay 
Bridge to Easton and one will find the 
ever to be remembered charm and hos- 
pitality in this fine hotel. 

Arthur J. Grymes, Jr. is the owner- 
manager of the hotel which is colonial 
designed, air conditioned and complete- 
ly fireproof. 

For dining there is the Gold Room. 
which has capacity for 300 for meetings, 
wedding receptions and dancing. The 
Garden Room for smaller intimate 
groups of 50. The main dining room is 
charming with its colonial decor and 
the cocktail lounge is most interesting. 
But best of all. the food in any of the 
dining rooms is superb. 

The hotel is located in town, con- 
venient for shopping and entertainment, 
vet within a few minutes drive of all 
ralbot Count) recreation: pleasure 
boats -the linest fishing and duck hunt- 
ing. Drive to the Tidewater Inn next 
Sunday for dinner. You'll enjoy a treat 
long to be remembered. 



I'iiik Pin Cocktail 
Uiige— Nigh! r 

• Dancing 

# Entertainment 



Olive Ave. on the 

Boardwalk 

Phone 8975 
for Reservations 

REHOBOTH BEACH, 
DEL. 



Harrington arms 

Ocean ( it > *s New eat 

81-APARTMENTS & ROOMS-SI 

All With Private Perches 

OPENED JUNE 15 

• ULTRA MODERN 
On the Atlantic Ocean 

• l-Bedroom Apartments With Tub and 
Shower 

• Beautiful Decor — Wall to Wall Carpeting 

• Larue and Spacious Living Room- 

• Kitchen and Dining Rooms Combined 

• Ideally Located at 2Sth Street and 
Baltimore Ave. 

ON THE OCEAN 

Free Parking on our own lot 

Write or call us for details 

ATlantic 9-7291 

(lordon, Philip and William Harrington 
Owners — Operators 



PHIMJI'V 

CRAB HOUSE 

M \mmiii RESTAURANT 

STEAMED CRABS TO GO 

■ Seafood Dinners 
» Crob Imperial 

• Soft Shell Clams 

• Soft Crabs VF*^ 

■ Shrimp \k\\ ^^"-^l'/ ' 

• Crob Cakes NS 1 t s£*' 
» Crab Soup 

• Lobsters 

Carry Out or Toble Service 

PHILA. AVE. near 20TH ST. 
OCEAN CITY, MD. 
ATlantic 9-7747 




SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 
ITS DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 
EDUCATION 



Mary J. A halt 



Education Facuj ty Notes 

Vernon E. Anderson. Dean of the Col- 
lege ol Education, h;is been appointed 
a member oi the Maryland Committee 
for the Advancement of School Admin- 
istration of the American Association 
of School Administrators, 

Dr. Anderson spent two weeks in 
German) to supervise education courses 
given in the overseas centers of Uni- 
versity College. He visited University 
branches in Heidelberg. Munich, and 
Wiesbaden. 

Glenn O. Blough. Professor of Edu- 
cation, has recently published Discov- 
ering Dinosaurs (Whittlesey House), a 
book for elementary-age children. This 
is his thirty-third book for children and 
teachers. His Young Peoples Book of 
Science has been translated into twelve 
languages. The most recent translations 
are Arabic and Japanese. 

Richard H. Byrne, Professor of Ed- 
ucation, as a member of the Committee 
on Counseling and Guidance of the 
Southern Regional Educational Board, 
attended a conference recently. Com- 
mittee members represent Richmond 
Public Schools, University of Texas, 
University of Alabama, University of 
Florida and the University of Mary- 
land. This committee will consider and 
suggest what regional action seems to 
be indicated in the field of guidance and 
counseling. 

Dr. Madelaine Mershon, Acting Di- 
rector of the Institute for Child Study, 
attended a dessert at the Alpha Xi Delta 
sorority at which time the Mary Lee 
Langford Memorial for the service of 
education was presented to the College 
of Education. Four books, chosen by 
the Human Development Staff, were 
presented in memory of Mary Lee Lang- 
ford to be placed in the library of the 
Institute for Child Study. 



Institute for Child Study 

Miss Grace Adams, Assistant Professor 
of Education, is on leave of absence 
this spring semester. She has just com- 
pleted a sixty-day safari in Africa and 
Zanzibar. She describes this as a "look- 
ing, not a shooting" safari. Miss Adams, 
an expert in photography, has been 
making an extensive collection of pic- 
tures of plant and animal life. She will 

(Continued on next page) 




Everybody has fun at 
OCEAN CITY, MD. 

Safe, dazzling white beach. Sporty new CD EC I llluttroted 
Rolf course. Exciting 3-mile boardwalk, r, * cc ' Boo |,| ot 

Fishing, racing, bicycling, tennis, mtr writ* »o. 

clubs. Finest hotels, motels, apartments, INFORMATION CINTIR 
cottages. Rates to fit any budget. Oc.on City, Md. 



flortk Winds Motel 



ROOMS AND 
APARTMENTS 



55th St. & Ocean Highway, Ocean City, Md. 



• Modern 2-Story Court 

• Telephones 

• Heated 

• Playgrounds & Picnic Area 

• Row boats, crabbing, clam- 
mintr, fishintr 

• One Block to Ocean — 
Guarded beach 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Townsend 
Owners - Managers 



• Each room - private hath 

• Beauty Rest Mattresses 

• Maid service — except 
kitchens 

• Cribs and rollaway beds 
available 

• One and 2-bedroom apts. 
have Daveno-bed in living 
room 

Phones : 
ATlantic 9-7688 and 9-B107 




AR1DEL- 



MOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Tile Baths • Housekeeping Facilities 

Life Guards on Beach 
41st STREET & BEACH ROAD 

Ocean City, Md. 



OCEAN CITY AT 9-7665 



CARL J. WILLIAMS & SONS 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
918 Cooper St. • Salisbury, Maryland 



PI 9-5444 



holiday house 

"The Toast of the Coast" 

8th St. at Boardwalk 
Ocean City, Maryland 



OPEN THRU SEPT. 
BEAUTYREST MATTRESS 
BATHING FROM ROOM 
OVERLOOKING THE OCEAN 
PRIVATE THE SHOWER BATHROOMS 
TELEPHONE EVERY ROOM 
NICHOLAS AND ROBERTA BROUS 
OWNERS - MANAGERS 



Phone: Ocean City ATlantic 9-9181 and 9-9182 




Spanish Main Motel 

14th St. and the Bay, OCEAN CITY, MD. 
New Fireproof, Deluxe Efficiency Apartments 

Heated for year round occupancy . . . Private porch with each 

apartment . . . Telephone in every room . . . TV Available . . . 

Free parking on premises 



ATlantic 9-9334 t£oo3eve(t j4ote( Ocean City, Md. 

On the Boardwalk, centrally located. An ideal vacation hotel. Famous 
Southern meals. Make your reservations early. Special rates for 
June and September. Write or phone Mr. and Mrs. El wood F. 

Fleming. Members of the Golf & Yacht Club 



J uly- August, 1960 



31 



JOSIE & MARIA'S 
RESTAURANT 




S/n i islizmg in 

STEAKS — LOBSTER 

PRIME RIB & ITALIAN FOOD 

Cocktail Lounge 

DANCING NIGHTLY 

An Conditioned— Open 7 Days 
a Week 

Special Prices for Children 

— 2 Location 
17th ST. & 
PHILADELPHIA AT 9-7180 

7 CAROLINE 

STREET AT 9-7075 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 

owner & Manager — 

Mr. Joseph Damiano and 
Mrs. Maria Pouloa 



Salty Sands Motel 

Kith St. & Ocean Front 
OCEAN CITY, MD. 



Every room and efficiency apart- 
ment with ocean view and large 
porch; private guarded beach; 
surf fishing. Maid service exclud- 
ing kitchen. Golf Club privileges 
available. 



Mr. and Mrs. 

Edward V.. Host, Jr. 

Xew Owners 



yiUani 



REALTY 
CO. 



ANGELO M. VILLANI, Realtor 
SALES 
RENTALS 
INVESTMENTS 

Residential — Commercial 
Ocean Front Apartments 

63rd & Beach Hwy. OCEAN CITY, MD. 
ATlantic 9-9186 




ii to I urope tor the remainder ol 
the summer. 



Km si Kl \l Educai ion 

l)r Donald Males. Professor and Head 
ol the Department ol Industrial Educa- 
tion, has been elected President ol the 
American ( ouncil on Industrial Arts 
readier Education. The Presidency ol 
the (ouncil is tor a two-year period. 
Dr. William Y. Tiemey, Associate Pro- 
lessor lit Industrial Education, has 
served as I xecutive Secretary tor this 
group lor the past three years and was 
reelected to serve again. 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake. Dean ol the 
I acuity and Professor of Industrial 
I ducation, was awarded an Honorary 
I ife Membership by the American 
(ouncil on Industrial Arts Teacher 
Education at the Council's recent meet- 
ing in Toronto. Canada. Dr. Hornbake's 
award is a result o\ his noted achieve- 
ments in industrial arts, teacher educa- 
tion and his many professional contri- 
butions. 



Nauowi Convention 

Nine members of the Industrial Educa- 
tion Department and two graduate stu- 
dents attended the joint Annual Con- 
vention of the American Industrial Arts 
Association and the American Council 
of Industrial Arts Teacher Education 
held in Toronto. Canada, in April. 

Participants in the Convention pro- 
grams included Dr. Paul E. Harrison. 
Dr. Eckhart A. Jacobsen, Mr. Carl S. 
Schramm, and Dr. William F. Tierne\. 
The safety program was planned by 
Mr. Edmund D. Crosby, another mem- 
ber of the Industrial Education Depart- 
ment. 

The following five Graduate Assist- 
ants attended the convention: Kenneth 
E. Dawson. Irving \Y. Herrick. Paul J. 
Manchak, Henry James Rokusek and 
Walter R. Williams. Jr. Two graduate 
students also accompanied the group. 
lewis J. Dickerson and Gil H. Tene- 
francia. Mr. Tencfrancia is Head of 
Teacher Education in the tloilo School 
ol Arts and Trades in the Philippines. 



Students Honored 

College of Education majors recently 
honored were as follows: Marlene Mur- 
ray, Arlene Joffe, and Carolyn Gouza, 

majors in elementary education: Pal 
Messer. major in home economics edu- 
cation, were chosen for Mortar Board 
because of their outstanding contribu- 
tions in the fields o\ scholarship, leader- 
ship ami service. 

Miss Marlene Murray, major in ele- 
mental education, was presented the 



THE 

NATIONAL BANK 
OF CAMBRIDGE 

Complete 
Banking Service 

Organized 1880 

SAFETY DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

Cambridge, Maryland 



U 




Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



Spring ~-Mitl 

PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY. MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE PI 9-5S94 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

S nee 1803 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

Member Feperal Deposit Ins. Corp. 



\7 



i ii l M a r v i K N D Magazine 



Outstanding c ommuting Student Award 
at the first University Club (Daydodger) 
banquet on M.i\ 12. Miss Murray w.is 
one of the i«o founders of the Univer- 
sity Club formed in September, l l >> l >. 



Business Education 

Miss June Wisnieski, a senior at the 
University of Maryland majoring in 
secretarial education in the College of 
Education, was presented with the 
United Business Education Award of 
Merit for outstanding achievement in 
business education. The United Business 
Education Association and its teacher 
education division, the National Asso- 
ciation for Business Teacher Education, 
sponsor this award. This award was 
presented to Miss Wisnieski by Dr. 
Vernon Anderson, Dean of the College 
of Education, and by Dr. Arthur S. 
Patrick. Head of Department of Office 
Techniques and Management, and Pro- 
fessor of Business Education. 

Miss Wisnieski is the daughter of 
Mrs. Agnes Wisnieski of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 



R. M. Rivello 



McLeod Elected President of 
Engineering Alumni 

Mr. Robert J. McLeod, C.E. '37, has 
been elected Chairman of the Board of 
Directors of the College of Engineering 
Chapter of the Alumni Association for 
the coming year. 

He has been a member of the Board 
for the past two years and served as 
Vice Chairman of the Board during 
the past year. Mr. McLeod. who resides 
in Hyattsville, Maryland, is Chief Engi- 
neer for the Washington Suburban San- 
itary Commission. 



Maryland Grads Win Military 
Engineering Awards 

Two Maryland University graduates 
were among those who received high 
awards for 1959 from the Society of 
American Military Engineers. Mr. 
Lansing G. Simmons, C.E. '23, was pre- 
sented with the Colbert Medal and Capt. 
Fred F. Kravath, U.S.N., was awarded 
the Toulmin Medal. 

(Continued on next page) 



DINNER BELL INN and MOTEL 

Corner of 1st. Street and Christian 
REHOBOTH BE V< II, DEL. 
AIR CONDITK >NED and III \ II l> 

PHONE 3161 

RESTA1 RANT Recommended In Duncan Hines and AAA 
Membei American Express Club 



THE C. PEARCE COADYS 




BLUEF HOUSE 

GREEN TURTLE CAY 

ABACO, BAHAMAS 

* 
THE BOAT HOUSE 

RESTAURANT & BAR 
Dewey Beach, Delaware 





&idfaw 




MASON CANNING COMPANY, INC. 



POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



Serving the Farm Since 1913 

The Shore's Finest Fertilizer 

THE WORCESTER FERTILIZER COMPANY 

SNOW HILL, MD. 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON. MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



Juh-August, 1960 



33 



Here is how to get 
the EXACT business 
form you need . . . 

Many forms are needed 
in business. But for 
every situation there is 
only one right type of 
form to use. You can be 
sure of getting this one 
form you need by buy- 
ing from a firm that 
offers a complete line. 
Phone or write for 
samples. 

For an unbiased recom- 
mendation, buy from a 
firm with a COMPLETE 
Line. 




Continuous 
(OImS 



ANOfSfl 
On! Iimi 
CAIION IO»«S 




AND FORMS 



Baltimore Business Forms 

Phone CEnter 3-8000 

Talbot (Tol) T. Speer (Class of 1917) 
Charles F. Ellinger (Class of 1937) 



LA 3 1551 



LA 31552 



ARISTOCRAT 

LINEN SUPPLY CO., INC. 

614-620 MOSHER STREET 
BALTIMORE 17, MARYLAND 

A Complete Linen Rental Service 
for all commercial establishments 

COATS 

APRONS 

UNIFORMS 

TOWELS 

TABLE LINEN 

WHY BUY? — WE SUPPLY! 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 

and ACCESSOR'ES 

Let our welt -trained staff assist you 

in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 



STATIONERY COMPANY 



17 S CHARLES ST. 

BALTIMORE 



MU 5-4377 



Serving this area tine* 1919 



\!i Simmons who is Physical Science 
Administrator ol the Geodesj Division 
oi the ( oast and Geodetic Survey, 
Washington, I) C, received the N 
tional Award foi I ngineering Achieve- 
ment. I he citation ol the award read: 
"lor his outstanding contributions to 
the advancement oi military engineer- 
ing through the development of basic 
techniques lor geodetic and precision 
surveys required by the Department ol 
Defense in research and development 

projects concerned with national de- 
fense. He has exercised high technical 
ability in devising basic techniques lor 
positioning and orienting missiles and 
guidance systems lor missiles at the Air 
Force Missile lest (enter at (ape 
Canaveral." 

(apt. Kravath. Deputy District Civil 
Engineer lor the 3rd Naval District. 
New York City, received the National 
Award lor Technical Writing for his 
article "Nuclear Development in Con- 
tinental Europe" which was judged to 
be the best article published in The 
Military Engineer tor 1959. He has re- 
ceived engineering degrees from Drexel. 
University ol Pennsylvania, and R.P.I, 
and has also studied at the University 
of Maryland and the Catholic Univer- 
sity of America. 



Ivviok Elected Chairman or 
ASME Chapter 

Mr. Dudley Taylor. M.E. "51. has been 
elected Chairman of the Washington 
Section of the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers for the coming 
year. Mr. Taylor, who is a mechanical 
engineer at the Naval Ordnance Labo- 
ratory, is a past Vice Chairman of the 
ASME Section and also served as Chair- 
man of the Board of Directors of the 
Engineering Chapter of the Alumni 
Association last year. 



Sussman Joins Mitre Corp. 

Jules P. Sussman. E.E. '56 (S.M. Har- 
vard "57). has been appointed to the 
position of Member of the Technical 
Staff of The MITRE Corporation. Lex- 
ington. Mass.. in the Radar Systems and 
techniques Department, where he will 
work on advanced radar systems and 
techniques. The MITRE Corporation. 
a non-profit organization, originally cre- 
ated by the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and Rand Engineering, is 
the technical adviser to the Department 
of Defense. Mr. Sussman. who resides 
in Lexington, Massachusetts, was for- 
merlv associated with Raytheon Com- 
pany's Airborne Equipment Operations 
in Sudbury, Massachusetts, as a circuit 
design engineer on airborne radar re- 
ceiving systems lor SAC bombers. Mr. 
Sussman would be glad to hear from 



Clifton D. Mayhew, 
Inc. 

Painting & Decorating 
Contractors 




J i $6 Lee Highway 

JAckson 5-6131 
Arlington, Va. 



VISIT 

Bernie Lee's 

PENN HOTEL 

(Newly renovated) 

OPEN DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 a.m. 
serving 

BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON- 
DINNER 

5 — Spacious Banquet Rooms 
Call VA 3-0300 for reservation 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
PACKAGE GOODS 

15 W. Perm. Avenue 

TOWSON, MARYLAND 

FREE PARKING 



._. 


ACME 


TILE COMPANY 


Terrazzo 


Tile — Marble — Slate 


A. F. Pizza 


PL 2-3554 908 Trinity St. 


Baltimore 2, Md. 



34 



the Maryland Magazine 



other Maryland engineers and scientists 
who are employed m or \ isit the greatei 
Boston area. 



Will Kl MtOl Is 

Norman M. Law lor. Jr.. '51. i\ a IV 
sign Engineer with J. E. Greiver Co.. 
Baltimore. Maryland. 

Hen Dyer, '31, in owner of the engi- 
neering firm of Men Dyei Associates 
and resides in Glenwood, Maryland. 

Tracy Coleman. '35, is a member ol 
the general contracting firm of Coleman 
and Wood. Inc. 

William J. 1-rere. Jr., '10. is retired 
and living in Tornpkinsville. Maryland. 

A. Morton Thomas. Jr.. '35, is owner 
of the engineering firm A. Morton 
Thomas and Associates. 

C. Tage Foltz, '35, is an engineer 
with the Service Department of the 
Washington Cias Light Co. 

Donald E. Anderson. A.E. '51. is a 
pilot with Capital Airlines. 

Ted J. Vandoren. '25. is a manufac- 
turers 1 representative in Washington, 
D. C. 

Emmett T. Loane. '29. is District 
Manager for the Chesapeake and Ohio 
Telephone Company of Maryland and 
has his home in Baltimore, Maryland. 

D. H. Saunders. '10, is an attorney 
in Washington, D. C. 

S. Chester Ward. C.E. '32, is Plan- 
ning and Development Engineer for the 
Washington Gas Light Company. 

Thomas Witkowski, E.E. '42, is Vice 
President of the Cubic Corporation of 
San Diego. California, a company en- 
gaged in developing guidance compon- 
ents for missiles. 



Faculty Notes 

Professor George F. Corcoran, Head of 
the Department of Electrical Engineer- 
ing, has written a fourth edition of his 
book. Alternating Currents. The book, 
which has been a standard textbook in 
the field for over 20 years, is co-auth- 
ored by Professor R. M. Kerchner of 
Kansas State University. 

Professor Gerald Corning of the 
Aeronautical Engineering Department 
has published a new revised edition of 
his book, Subsonic and Supersonic Air- 
plane Design. 



Professor Hodgins Retires 

Professor Lawrence J. Hodgins of the 
Electrical Engineering Department is 
retiring after 45 years on the faculty at 
the University of Maryland. Professor 
Hodgins who graduated from Pennsyl- 
vania State College in 1914 first joined 

(Continued on next page) 




THE 

SKELETON 
OF A 
GIANT. 



• • • 



RIBS OF STEEt, NATURALLY . . . because 
only steel is strong enough. The skeleton of Mary 
land's huge Student Activities Building contains 14 
241-foot steel arches fabricated by Dietrich Broth- 
ers, Inc. It's just one of many handsome structures 
on the College Park campus containing steel fabri- 
cated by Dietrich Brothers, Inc. 

WHEN THE JOB CALLS FOR STEEL . . . 

Cull . . . 

DIETRICH BROTHERS, INC. 

Baltimore 18, Maryland Hopkins 7-9700 

Washington, D. C. 

Raleigh, N. C. (Insurance Bldg.) Temple 2-5623 



STEEL WAREHOUSING 
STEEL FABRICATING 




%l -■■'■- ■ - uuiJTi] 



OLES 



Ux 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



Jjallimore s 1 loneer (envelope ^Manufacturer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. ADams 4-3979 



oA <Well Pressed DWan ^ears a ZHat 



OUTHCOMB 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 

Stetson Ties 




109 E. BALTIMORE STREET 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



LExington 9-5799 




Dietrich & feambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 
A Maryland Institution 



MUlberry 5-2823 Established 1876 

^mttli i Jdoo/c 3/v^" 

MEMBER ABAA 

OLD, RARE AND OUT OF-PRINT BOOKS 

MARYLAND BOOKS - SCHOLARLY BOOKS 

805 N. HOWARD ST. 

Baltimore 1, Md. 

ALLEN W. SCHULTZ 



July-August, 1960 



35 



/ it /ii/t u.tit L utinlrtj siilf 



^H^l 



OJney In 



\ 



'Old Plantation Recipes" 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 

(Closed Mondays) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

BRIDGE PARTIES. WEDDINGS. 

BANQUETS. CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

— Ample Parking Space — 
PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 
Guituua Allison Bhwrb, Owner 



The Asphalt Service Co. 



Inc. 



1836 Chesapeake Ave. 



Elgin 5-1560-61 



BALTIMORE 26, MD. 



(/Sard --Ji von S^cliool 
Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 

SO.') X. Charles St. VE. 7-1155 
Baltimore, Md. 



the faculty as an Instructor in Electrical 
neering and Physics in the fall of 

1915. At that time the University was 
known as the Maryland Agricultural 
College. He was advanced to the grade 
i>t Assistant Professor in 1918 and 

Associate Professor in 1932. He was 
presented with a plaque by the Univer- 
sity of Mars land Alumni Association 
in 1951 for "Meritorious Service to the 
College ol Engineering" and in 1959 
was honored by the Student Branch of 
the All 1 with a plaque engraved "For 
Outstanding leadership and Service to 

\ll I lie served as faculty advisor 
to AIEE for 23 years. In addition to 
being a member of AIEE. Professor 
Hodgms is a member of the American 
Society of Engineering Education. 
American Association of University 
Professors. Washington Society of En- 
gineers. Maryland Society of Profes- 
sional Engineers, Phi Delta Theta. Tau 
Beta Pi. and Eta Kappa Nu. He has 
been an active member of the Kiwanis 
Club of Prince George's County and is 
presently 2nd Vice President of that 
organization. 

Professor Hodgins plans to continue 
to reside at his home in College Park. 



Rogers Appointed to Engineering 
Registration Board 

Mr. Helme Rogers, E.E. "25. was ap- 
pointed to the State Board of Registra- 
tion for Professional Engineers on 
March 11. 1960, by Gov. Tawes upon 
the recommendation of the Maryland 
Section of the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers. Mr. Rogers, a Reg- 
istered Professional Engineer in the 
State of Maryland, has been with the 
Baltimore Gas and Electric Company 
for over 30 years. His present position 
is Superintendent of the Meter and In- 
stallation Department, where he is re- 
sponsible for electrical measurements, 
including customer billing. In addition, 
he is active on half a dozen national 
industry committees of such organiza- 
tions as AIEE, Edison Electrical Insti- 
tute, and the Association of Edison 
Illuminating Companies which are con- 
cerned with various aspects of electrical 
measurements, industry standards, and 
equipment specifications. 



Hoiden Secretary of Aircraft 
Armamem I S 

Thomas J. Hoiden. M.E. '49. was elect- 
ed to the office oi Secretary of Aircraft 
Armaments. Inc. of Cockeysville, Marx- 
land. Mr. Hoiden. who is a resident of 
Baltimore. received an L.L.B. degree and 
was registered to practice in the U. S. 
Patent Office in 1952. He was admitted 
to the Bar o\ the State of Maryland 
in 1954. 








HIGH DIVIDENDS plus 
INSURED SAFETY 

Vermont 
Federal 
Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Fayette at Hanover Streets 

Baltimore 3, Maryland 

All accounts insured up to SI 0,000.00 
by an agency of (he United States Gov't 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 



m 



36 



the Maryland Magazine 



School of 

LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Rribluh 







1 




Mr. Rettheii> 



Rettberg Promoted 

Charles C. Rettberg, Jr., has been pro- 
moted to Assistant General Solicitor by 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Born 
in Baltimore, he moved to Pittsburgh 
with his family when a child and re- 
ceived his early education in the Mt. 
Lebanon public schools. Returning to 
Maryland, he attended the University 
of Maryland, graduating from the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences in 1953. He 
graduated as an honor student with the 
LL.B. degree in 1955. Mr. Rettberg 
joined the legal department of the B&O 
as law clerk after graduation and was 
promoted to attorney the following year. 
He is a member of the American Bar 
Association and the Junior Bar Asso- 
ciation of Baltimore City. 



Chicago Attorney Honored 

Mr. J. Francis Dammann, '03, received 
the Carroll Medal at the June 5 com- 
mencement exercises of Loyola College, 
Baltimore. 

A native of Baltimore, Mr. Dammann 
practiced law there until 1906. He was 
admitted to the Illinois bar and has 
'ieen a prominent attorney in Chicago 

(Continued on next page) 



J uly- August, 1960 



POOR, BOW ION, 

BARTLETT «.■ KENNEDY, INC. 




Insurance & Bonding of every 
description for more than 
half a century 


Po/icy analysis 
Engineering surveys 
Appraisals 


Phone: LExington 9-6004 

BALTIMORE 3. MD. 

26 S. CALVERT STREET 



DIRECT FACTORY 
AGENTS FOR 

M. G. 

AUSTIN 

HEALEY 

MAGNETTE 

MORRIS 

HILLMAN 

SUNBEAM 

ALPINE 

DAIMLER 

TRIUMPH 

SPRITE 

JAGUAR 

ALFA-ROMEO 

PORSCHE 



SALES A 




RVICE 



■ ■<ts j 



>'S FINE! 
Economy 





1001 CATHEDRAL ST. BALTIMORE, MD. 

LExington 9-1559 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 



Phone MUlberry 5-6070 



Baltimore 23, Md. 



MARYLAND CHIEF 



TOMATOES 



Packed 
By 

J. LANGRALL & BRO. INC. 

CANNERS SINCE 1878 




WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 
Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 
Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION WITHOUT 

OBLIGATION 

4904 WISCONSIN AVE. N.W. 

EM 3-9660 Washington, D. C. 

4701 YORK ROAD 
ID 5-4535 Baltimore, Md. 



BUY DEFENSE BONDS EVERY PAY DAY 



37 



• - - v v s s s s 

1913 1960 

AGAIN!! 

AC CONSECUTIVE 

5|3 th DIVIDEND 



S 

.v 

s 
s 
s 



NOW PAID QUARTERLY* 

HAS BEEN PAID OR CREDITED 

to SAVERS at 

FRATERNITY 

FEDERAL 

Savings And Loan A 

764-770 Washington Blvd. 

Baltimore S, Maryland 



\l\\ 


DIVIDE \l> PE 


RIOD SI 


\l< I S 


11 1 \ 


i Sh 


in tin 


ll. VI 


lnul 


i divi 






.1.1 i.. 
\i iU 


\ 1 II 


K ■ 


count 



I \ v I Rl 1 1 

-in. Govt Agi i 

HIGH! R DI\ IDE NDS 



i in i 
SAVE bj MAM. 

[•HREE I > iv I \ E 
UP WINDOWS 

I 1 1 — I i r I'AKK- 

I \i. I i i I 




1HOI MARK 




• TCRLINC 
•1» I IOOO 



5, 




'cnoneia ^ompanu inc. 

DUrtina Diwerware 

Qarle S *lPleas»nl Sis "BalUore-I.Md 



Career in Business 

Day & Evening Classes 
Complete Courses 

Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

Stenographic, Junior Accounting. 

Write or Phone for Catalogue 

STRAY ER COLLEGE 

18 N. Charles St. LE 9-5626 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The "Handy" Line 

Baltimore, Md 



foi over 50 years. He is a member and 

past president Ol the ( hicagO Bar Asso- 
ciation and former president ol the law 

( lub ii) c bicago. Mr. Dammann has 
maintained an active interest in higher 
education both at Loyola College in 
Baltimore and Loyola University in 
( bicago. 



Law Day 

LaVJ Day, whose observance President 
1 isenhower called lor to demonstrate 

"devotion to the rule ol law as the ke>- 
Stone ol peace and order in our national 
and international life," was celebrated 

May 2 at the School ol I au in cere- 
monies held in the Law School Audi- 
torium. Judge Reuben Oppenheimer. of 
the Supreme Bench ol Baltimore City, 
was the principal speaker of the day. 



Student News 

More than 50 students from the Johns 
Hopkins University, the University of 
Maryland, and Loyola College attended 
a Pre-Lau Program for undergraduate 
students April 22. at the University of 
Maryland School of Law. The program, 
first of its kind on the campus, was in- 
tended to give students a basis for a 
realistic appraisal of the study of law. 
The Maryland Law Review of the 
School of Law recently announced the 
appointment of its editors for the school 
year 1960-1961. They are: Editor. 
Robert J. Carson; Casenote Editor. 
Howard S. Chasanow; Recent Decisions 
Editor, Frank J. Vecella; Assistant Edi- 
tors, Herbert J. Belgrad. William G. 
Kolodner, and Joseph A. Matera. The 
editorships are considered among the 
top honors granted by the Law School 
and usually lead to such appointments 
as clerks to the Judges o\' the Court of 
Appeals oi Maryland or to Federal 
Judges in Maryland. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Ac adi \n Day 

Maryland Academy Day. an annual sci- 
entific program arranged by the Post- 
graduate Committee of the School of 
Medicine lor the Maryland Academy 




X JtoTo JLnflrdvnids 
tor JL roarams 

— V afolofl. 



ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



ZSSKAV 

1HQUALITY.W 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
Wm. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDLE CO. 



King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoqo 7-S83S 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2. MD. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1 , Md. 



38 



tup Maryland Magazine 



ol Genera] Practice, was held t li is. yeai 
on Mav 5. l he program featured .1 
choice oi three panel discussions >.k'i 
matology, medical diagnosis, and gyne 
cology. Patients were presented in all 
three discussions 



Rl si vk> 11 Si NOPSIS 

Mice that develop a pattern of obesit) 
like "middle-age spread" in people have 
been bred at the School of Medicine 
by Dr. Frank H. J. Figge, Professor and 
Head of the Department of Anatomy. 
Fat mice, like fat men. seem to be heir 
to many ills, he finds. The new strain 
of mice is susceptible to a wide variety 
of cancer, for example, and many of 
the mice develop diabetes. Older ani- 
mals often have enlarged hearts and 
arteriosclerosis. 

The Department of Pharmacology 
has received a three-year grant of $29,- 
700 from the U. S. Public Health Ser- 
vice for the synthesis of potential anti- 
cancer agents. Dr. R. M. Burgison, who 
is conducting the research in collabora- 
tion with Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr., states 
that in the past four years the Depart- 
ment has submitted nearly 500 com- 
pounds to the National Cancer Institute 
for testing against cancer in mice. 

The mechanisms of taste and smell 
in insects may seem a far cry from the 
action of drugs in mental illness. Re- 
search in progress at The Psychiatric 
Institute, however (based on previous 
work by Drs. V. Dethier and L. J. 
Mullins), deals with the possibility that 
both phenomena may be approached 
through study of nerve cell membranes 
and their relationship to the physical 
properties of molecules to which they 
are exposed. 

This research is being carried out in 
the Institute's Neurobiology Labora- 
tories, directed by Dr. Robert Grenell. 
The work of the laboratories, aimed at 
correlating biochemical and physiologi- 
cal measures with psychological factors, 
is being supported this year by grants 
from five agencies. It is, according to 
Dr. Eugene B. Brody, Director of the 
Psychiatric Institute, one aspect of the 
Institute's broad research program 
studying determinants of human be- 
havior at every level from that of cell 
biology through that of individual psy- 
choanalysis, to the study of social inter- 
action. 

A U. S. Public Health Service grant 
is supporting a study of psychothera- 
peutic substances and their effects on 
brain and behavior. This investigation 
is based in part on prior work relating 
to olfaction and taste by Dr. L. J. 
Mullins, visiting Professor of Biophys- 
ics at the Psychiatric Institute. 

Dr. Mullins found that both taste and 
smell depend on the relationship of the 

(Continued on next page) 



Moving with Care, Everywhere 



by Land 



i a— i 1 



by Sea 



by Air 



DfiVIDSOI\ 

TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. 



• Pre-Planned Moving to take many details off your hands 

• Nation-Wide and World-Wide Service thru United Van Lines 

• Sanitized Vans, protected against germs, insects, odors 

• Saf-T-Pak, cleanest, safest method for fragile goods 

• Palletized Storage, each lot in clean, mobile containers 
BALTIMORE • BRoadway 6-7900 WASHINGTON • LAwrence 9-2700 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

53rd ANNIVERSARY — Organized 1906 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts • liberal dividends 

Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 




^f 



PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. ELgin 5-9300 



F. A. Davis & Sons 


WHOLESALERS 


Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 


Kitchen & Dining Equipment 


Soda Fountain Supplies 


119 S. HOWARD STREET 


Baltimore 1, Md. 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

ROOM 1100 

501 St. Paul St. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 

LExington 9-0020 



Buy Defense Bonds 
Every Payday 

J. H. F. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24. Md. 



THE SOUTHERN PLATE C LASS (0. =^^ 

:Z^m^ZZZIZ^I=HZZZZIZZIIIZ ^/Laa. and cM,£.tai dontxactoxi. 

2519 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE |Ap AVCTT p Q 79flfl 
BALTIMORE 17. MARYLAND LAFAYETTE O m i L\)\j 



July- August, 1960 



39 



Why 




is 



mnRVLMlD 5 FIHEST CORH 

P Btilim Corn tastes like 

in the cob . . . the 
ifitchell'a own process- 

■ als the 
coi n in can « it i>- 

III th( ft| 

pulled from I 

stalk. 



$S£2I£ 



SHOE PEG 




or 




GOLDEN 



SWEET 



— Packed by — 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

PERRYMAN, MD. • KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 
Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen, 621 -J 



PESTS? TERMITES? 

"Gall Iks c^l Rods Man" 




PEST Control SINCE I8G 



C. Walter Pouter, Mgr. 
SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



THE 
TOWN 
HOUSE 

'Famous for hood In 
the Maryland Tradition" 

Open Daily 

LUNCHEON, COCKTAILS, 
DINNER 

Howard at 27th HO 7-5191 
Baltimore, Md. 



The COHN & BOCK CO. 

Lumber • Building Material 

poultry FEEDS livestock 

PRINCESS ANNE. MARYLAND 



molecular structure ol the receptor cell 
membrane to the structure Ol molecules 
producing the sensation. His current in- 
vestigation witfa Dr. drenell involves 
the broader study ol excitation anil de- 
pression ol nerve cells as influenced by 
drugs. I he object is first to learn more 
about the structure ol the cell membrane 
and then to test, uith drugs of known 
molecular structure, certain theoretical 
assumptions about cellular response to 
drugs. II correct, the theories may lead 
to methods of predicting drug action 
on the basis of molecular structure. 

A grant from the National Science 
I oundatlOU is supporting another aspect 
cl l)r (Hindi's studv ol the cell mem- 
brane. There is much evidence to sug- 
gest that the membrane is made up of 
a combination ol protein and lipid 
molecules and this investigation is an 
attempt, by means of infrared spectro- 
scopy, to arrive at a model of the struc- 
ture and bonding of this molecular 
complex. The effect of anesthetics on 
the molecular structure, as judged h\ 
infrared spectroscopy, will also be ex- 
plored in studies being carried out v\ith 
Dr. Leopold May. 

A third grant, from the National In- 
stitutes of Health, supports experiments 
designed to elucidate specific metabolic 
pathways in cerebral metabolism. One 
such study involves mapping adenosine 
triphosphate concentrations in the brains 
of various animals under different con- 
ditions. (Adenosine triphosphate, or 
ATP, is the major source of high energy 
phosphate used by the nerve cell.) 
Another series of experiments tests the 
effects of anions on the regulation of 
brain activity. 

The influence of oxygen deprivation 
on the structure and function of brain 
cells is being investigated with the aid 
of a grant from the U. S. Navy. This 
work, which involves infrared spectro- 
scopy and ultraviolet microscopy, is 
conducted with brain tissue extracts, 
and with single nerve cells from the 
brains of living animals. 

Dr. Grcnell and his staff are also 
working in conjunction with the research 
laboratories of the Division of Harvard 
University's Department of Psychiatry 
at Massachusetts General Hospital in 
studying the effects of sensory depriva- 
tion on brain cells. The brain cells of 
animals shielded from all possible sen- 
sory stimuli will be chemically analyzed 
to determine whether the energy mech- 
anisms of the cells are changed. 

In collaborating with Dr. Cirenell. Dr. 
Mullins is pursuing his own primary 
interest, study of the structure and 
function ol the cell membrane. His work 
is being supported with the aid of grants 
from the National Science Foundation, 
the U. S. Public Health Service, and 
the Atomic Energy Commission. 

The Psychiatric Institute has been 
awarded SI 25.000 from the National 



CARLEA 

1 be Home of 

BRAND NAME 



Sanitation Chemicals 

AND 

Janitor Supplies 

SIMON1Z 

— Cleaners and Waxes 

BKILLO 

— Steel Wool Floor and 
Hand Pads 

BLACK & DECKER 

— Commercial 
Vacuums 

GENERAL 

— Electric — Floor 

Scrubbing & Polishing Machines 

CARLEA JANITOR SUPPLY CO. 

516 W. Franklin St. 
MU 5-5608 Baltimore 1, Md. MU 5-5269 






HOTEL SUPPLY CO. 



EST. 



Purveyors of Flna 1*27 

MEATS • POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hetili. 

Initltitloni, Shlpi, 

ClKii, iu. 



LE.xington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St., S.E. 

Lincoln 3-8151 

Virg : nia residents JEfferson 4-1110 

Northwest and suburban LOckwood 5-3556 

Baltimore MEdford 3-6500 

Towson VAIley 5-7133 

Glen Burnie SOuthfield 1-0550 

Annapolis COIonial 8-3451 

OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 

MARYLAND 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



40 



THE M ARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Institute ol Mental Health to support 
the teaching ol medical students and 
graduate training of psychiatrists. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Brody, Director ol the 
Institute, the grant will he used to re- 
evaluate the curriculum, improve teach- 
ing methods, support able teachers, and 
establish techniques for selecting stu- 
dents capable Of advanced work. The 
grant will also permit expansion of the 
curriculum to include such behavioral 
sciences as the psychology of le. lining. 
experimental psychology, sociology, an- 
thropology, and study oi growth and 
development of children, particularly as 
affected by emotional disorders. 



Dr. Krantz Receives Two Awards 

Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr.. Head of the 
Department of Pharmacology, was hon- 
ored by the International Anesthesia 
Research Society at its 34th congress 
held recently in Washington, D. C. A 
scroll presented to Dr. Krantz cited him 
for "meritorious achievement in re- 
search, teaching, and authorship." 

Dr. Krantz was recently honored for 
his 30 years of service to the U. S. 
Pharmacopoeia, by special citation pre- 
sented to him at the 1960 decennial 
convention of the Pharmacopoeia. 



Faculty Notes 

Dr. William Dewey Blake has been 
appointed Professor and Head of the 
Department of Physiology. Dr. Blake 
comes from his post as Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physiology at the University 
of Oregon Medical School. He is an 
alumnus of Dartmouth College and re- 
ceived his medical degree from Harvard 
Medical School. He is a member of the 
American Physiological Society, the 
American Society for Clinical Investi- 
gation, the Western Association of 
Physicians, and Sigma Xi. 

Students of the School of Medicine 
recently paid honor to Dr. Dietrich C. 
Smith, Associate Dean of the School, 
when they presented him with a plaque 
"in recognition of his kind, devoted, 
and unselfish service." In presenting the 
plaque at a meeting of the Student 
Council, John P. Light, council presi- 
dent, spoke particularly of Dean Smith's 
willingness to permit students to make 
their own decisions relating to student 
affairs, even though this undoubtedly 
caused him more trouble. Dean Smith's 
thoughtful guidance, Mr. Light said, 
had helped the students overcome many 
obstacles. 

Professor Heinrich von Hayek, M.D., 
Ph.D., Director of the Anatomical In- 
stitute of the University of Vienna, re- 

(Continued on next page) 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll |,| M ■•■■■■ ••■••■!•.......,,,,,,,, 

nn ii m i m ii nm ii m ii mn ii*««iin..m.........,....,..,,,,,,...., - 



YORK BUILDING PRODUCTS CO. 

Inc. 



Manufacturers of 
Superior Concrete Masonry Units 



Phone York 8-2818 



York, Pa. :: 




OPPRESSING 

elightful Flavors 

FRENCH ONION 

ON & HORSERADISH 

BLUE CHEESE 



WONDERFUL AS A DIP OR SALAD DRESSING 



OLSEN EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Engineered Equipment, Casters, Trucks, 
Conveyors and Fiberglas Products 

Portable Commercial Kitchen Equipment 

961 North Hill Rd. CH 3-6793 

Baltimore 18, Md. SA 7-8666 

Branch Office: Washington, D. C. STerling 3-3480 



MARIE C. ARMACOST 




Private Convalescent Home 

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 
Member of National Geriatrics Society 
Member American Nursing Home Assocn. 
Licensed by Maryland State Nursing 

Home Society 
24 Hour Nursing Service 
Moderate Rates — 
Orderly and Dietician in Attendance 

DR 7-5225 
812 Regester Ave., Baltimore 12, Md. 



July-August, 1960 



41 



HARVEY DAIRY 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 

SERVING PRINCE GEORGES 
and MONTGOMERY COUNTIES 



four Neighbors 
Buy Our Milk 



• Vitamin D Homogenized Milk 

• Grode A Pasteurized Milk 

• Eitra Rich Homogeniied 
Vitamin D Milk 

• Cultured Buttermilk 

• Fat Free Milk 

• Chocolate Milk 

• Butter-Sweet Cream 

• Cottage Cheese 

• Egg* — Strictly Fresh 

• Half and Half 

• Sour Cream 

• Table Cream 

• Whipping Cream 

• Margarine 

• Fresh Orange Juice 



APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 



BETHESDA CINDER BLOCK 
MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

Complete Line of 

M ISONRT SUPPLIES 

BRICK - CINDER BLOCK 

River Rd. at B & O R.R. OL 4-1616 ', 

BETHESDA, MD. 



CERAMIC 
TILING OF QUALITY 

Prompt Repair Service 
— No Job too Small — 
MARBLE — SLATE for 
FIREPLACES & TABLE TOPS 

Covering entire Metropolitan area 

EDWIN E. ELLETT 

1106 9th STREET, N.W. 
CO 5-87S1 WASHINGTON, D.C 



centlj visited the School ol Medicine 
fol .i series ol three lectures. Dr. von 
Hayek's lectures were based on his 
man) yean ol intensive research relat- 
ing to the anatomv and physiology ol 
the lung, conducted at Vienna and be- 
lore that at the L'niversitv of Wiirz- 
hurg. He has written scores ol articles 
about the lung and is perhaps best 
known lor his book hie Menschliche 
Lunge. His host at (he University, Dr. 
Vernon I Krahl, has translated the 
book into I nglish lor the Halner Pub- 
lishing Company. I he English edition, 
I lie iiiniiiin i. mm. is intended as a ref- 
erence work lor anatomists, clinicians, 
and specialists concerned with the lung 
in health and disease. In this translation 
an important new section featuring elec- 
tron microscopy ol the lung has been 
added to the original work. 

Dr. Carlo A. Cuecia. Associate Pro- 
lessor of Radiology, left recently for a 
three-month trip in Europe. He will 
spend the first month in Paris, where 
he has been invited to give a series 
of lectures in the field of radiation 
therapv of cancer at Fondation Curie. 
one of the leading cancer centers in 
the world. Dr. Cuccia will spend the 
remaining time visiting other leading 
cancer institutes in England. Denmark. 
Sweden, and Switzerland. 



Student News 

Warfield Scholarships, which provide 
full tuition in the sum of $650.00. have 
been awarded to five students: Steven 
E. Beasley. Sherwood E. Wilson. John 
J. Conroy. Stuart Handwerger. and 
Edward J. Ruley. These scholarships 
were established from the income of 
funds provided by the will of Dr. Clar- 
ence Warfield. an alumnus of the School 
of Medicine. This is the first time that 
they have been made available to fresh- 
man medical students. 

Martha Stauffer, senior student at the 
School of Medicine, won first place in 
the I960 student pn/e-essay competition 
of the New England Journal of Medi- 
cine. The prize has a cash award of 
S200.00. Her winning essay, reporting 
the clinical and biochemical features oi 
a fatal case oi oxalosis and reviewing 
the literature about this rare and little- 
known disease, will be printed in the 
Journal sometime during the summer 
months. Oxalosis is a metabolic disease 
of unknown origin. It usually appears 
in childhood and is suspected when kid- 
nc\ stones occur for no apparent reason 

The University of Maryland chapter 
of the Student American Medical Asso- 
ciation has announced election of the 
following officers for the 1960-1961 
school vear: President. William B. W eg- 
licki, Jr.: Vice President. Jon W. Far- 
inholt; Secretary-Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
futile. 



The gathering /tlace for 
Maryianders of Good Taste 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 
1730 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 
STerling 3-1730 

Open 'ill Midnlghi — Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 



PURE 



Meat Products 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 



s 


T E It 1. 1 \ i . 
PROCESS 




BOOKBINDING 


Every 


Type For Every Purpose 


A Com 


Dlete Printers Finishing Service 




9401 Baltimore Blvd. 




WE 5-6884 




COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Thompson Furniture Co. 

Tur nit lire of O unlit i 

at Reasonable Prices 

MODERN & PERIOD 

SIMMONS, KROEHLER, THOMASVILLE, 
BASSETT, GEM CRIB & CRADLE, LANE 

1810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E. 
Washington, D.C. LA 6-1622 



42 



mm: Maryland Magazine 



School of 

NURSING 



/ illie Ml argey 



Ai umnaf. News 

Dr. and Mrs. S. A. Macis are living in 
Glendora, California. Dr. Macis N\as 

Chief Medical Consultant for the United 
Fruit Company stationed in Honduras. 
Central America. Mrs. Macis was Hady 
Brown. '19. 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Owen, and six 
children are living in Trenton, Michi- 
gan. Mr. Owen is employed by U. S. 
Steel. The Owens, mother and children, 
three boys and three girls, joined Mr. 
Owen in March, 1959. in Trenton. Mrs. 
Owen was Catherine Kurzenknabe, '43. 

Dr. and Mrs. George R. Callender, 
Jr., have two children. Helen Anne and 
Ginge David. Mrs. Callender was Helen 
Welham, '43. The Callenders live in 
Charleston, West Virginia, where Dr. 
Callender has a very large practice. 

Mrs. Mary Benevicz Nowland, '55, 
writes, "We are being transferred to 
Newfoundland in January, 1960. Greet- 
ings to all our friends and classmates." 

Mrs. John B. Magruder, '09, who has 
been visiting her daughter, Mrs. Cath- 
erine Magruder Small, '39, in Califor- 
nia, has returned to 579 Woodbine Ave- 
nue. Towson, Md. Mrs. Magruder was 
with her daughter for about one year. 

Mrs. Mary Reinhart Anderson, '53, 
writes us, "I am here in Charlottesville, 
Virginia, because my husband is in 
school. We are expecting that he will 
graduate in June and after that my plans 
are very indefinite. I am currently em- 
ployed at the University of Virginia 
Hospital as night supervisor. We have 
one child, age three, named Mary 
Frances." 



Cardiovascular Nursing Studied 
by Betty Shubkagel 

Miss Betty Lou Shubkagel, Assistant 
Professor of Medical and Surgical Nurs- 
ing, recently completed a course in car- 
diovascular nursing at the University 
of Minnesota School of Public Health. 

In participating in the course Miss 
Shubkagel had an opportunity to ex- 
change ideas with nurses and physicians 
in the school, which is one of the 
world's leading centers of cardiac sur- 
gery. 

She participated in the care of pa- 
tients at the Variety Club Heart Hos- 
pital, where she also observed open 
heart surgery, followed patients in home 

(Continued on next page) 



BARBER & ROSS CO 

EST. 1876 

2323 - 4th St. N. E. Washington, D. C. 

DEcatur 2-0501 



FREE DELIVERY 



FREE PARKING 



SUPPLIER & DISTRIBUTOR OF THESE MAJOR ITEMS 

Builders Hardware — Power Tools — Package Homes 

Major Appliances — Structural Steel — Lumber 

Jalousie Doors — Aluminum Windows — Millwork 

Paint — General Hardware — Kitchen Cabinets 

Metal Bucks & Doors 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 








TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

8135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md. 



July-August, 1960 



43 



RGSIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



^signers 



PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 
& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



Finer Foods Since 1858 




w 

Washington, D. C. ^EH; 



Official Eating; Place 
of the Alumni 



1107 Connecticut Ave. 



Next to 

the Mayflower Hotel 




cue. attended classes in physiology and 
pathology, and look part in medical 
conferences at which interesting heart 
cases were presented and discussed. 

Miss Shuhkagel is a graduate of the 
Universin ol Maryland School ol 
\uismg and holds a master's degree 
from Emory University. Atlanta. Cieor- 
gia. 



Alumni Association 
School of PHARMACY 

University of Maryland 

B. Olive Cole, Chairman 
Publications Committee 



The Annual Meeting of the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy. 
University of Maryland, was held on 
May 5, 1960, in the Kelly Memorial 
Building. 

President Victor H. Morgenroth. Jr.. 
welcomed the members and friends, 
gave a short resume of the activities of 
the year, expressing appreciation of the 
privilege of serving as President, with 
cooperative committees, which success- 
fully planned and executed the many 
affairs of the year. 

Dean Noel E. Foss reported receipt 
of special grants to the School of Phar- 
macy; also the appreciation of the con- 
tinued support of the Alumni Associa- 
tion in providing $400.00 annually to 
secure a like amount from the Ameri- 
can Foundation for Pharmaceutical Ed- 
cation for undergraduate students. 

Executive Secretary, Frank J. Slama, 
read communications from members 
and organizations. 

Mrs. Frank M. Budacz gave the an- 
nual report of the Treasurer, which in- 
cluded money from dues, the proceeds 
from the Souvenir Program of Febru- 
ary, 1960, and contributions to the 
Scholarship Fund — the balance repre- 
senting a tidy sum for the 1960-61 
activities. The Treasurer's report was 
audited by H. Nelson Warrield, Frank 
L. Black and John F. Wannenwetsch. 

Reports were received from the fol- 
lowing standing committees: Executive 
Committee. Chairman Samuel Portney: 
General Chairman. Irving I. Cohen: 
Program Committee. James P. Cragg. 
Jr., Chairman; Ticket Committee. Alex- 
ander M. Mayer. Chairman; Public Re- 
lations Committee. Milton A. Friedman, 
Co-Chairman; Entertainment Commit- 
tee, Robert J. Kokoski. Chairman; Place 
and Arrangement Committee. Sam A. 
Goldstein, Chairman; Publications Com- 
mittee, B. Olive Cole, Chairman; De- 
ceased Members Committee. Francis S. 
Balassone, Chairman; Student Recruit- 
ing Committee. H. Nelson \\ arfield. 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 




Now you can Tour 

EUROPE 

During the 
Uncrowded Season 

$150 a week 

Sail on Queen Mary, 
Bremen, or Hanseatic 
New York back to New York 
5 weeks, 10 countries 
England, Holland, Belgium, Lux- 
embourg, Germany, Austria, Italy, 
Monaco, Switzerland, France. 
Browned Dividend Tours 
Escorted motor coach tours let you 
enjoy the countryside, small town, 
major cities (sightseeing). Brown- 
ell service provides good hotels 
excellent meals. 

World W/rfc Travvl 
Serrift* iorp. 

MERCURY BUILDING 

20th & K Sts. N.W. 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 
Phone: FEderal 3-9373 



NORTH 
WASHINGTON PRESS 

Inc. 

We Specialize in Printing 
for Churches and Schools 

5644 3rd Street, N.E. 

WASHINGTON II, D. C 

LAwrence 6-8626 



44 



the Maryland Magazine 



Chairman; Student Aid and Scholarship 
Committee, Samuel I. Raichlen, Chair- 
man (read by Joseph Cohen); Member- 
ship Committee. Mis. Frank M. Budacz; 

Kelly Memorial Committee. Simon Sol- 
omon. Chairman; Committee on Hon- 
ored Alumnus. Joseph Cohen, Chair- 
man. 

The Public Relations Committee rec- 
ommended that a Bulletin of the Asso- 
ciation be published lour times a year, 
and that mailings be sent to each mem- 
ber of the Association. 

The Committee on Honored Alum- 
nus. Joseph Cohen. Chairman, reported 
that Mr. Ellis B. Myers was chosen as 
the Honored Alumnus. 

Mr. H. Nelson Warfield, as Chairman 
of the Recruiting Committee, recom- 
mended that the title of the committee 
he changed to "Careers in Pharmacy"; 
that the Maryland Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation and the Baltimore Metropolitan 
Pharmaceutical Association be invited 
as co-sponsors with the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, and that attention be given in 
.:d\ising Guidance Counsellors in re- 
gard to the advantages of students in 
Pharmacy. 

The Student Aid and Scholarship 
Committee reported 29 applications for 
scholarships and one loan. Ten students 
were selected from this group and eight 
scholarships were awarded. One student 
withdrew from the course and two did 
not pass the requirements of the first 
semester for continued scholarships. 

Mr. Samuel Portney was selected as 
the representative of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation at the graduation exercises at 
College Park, to greet the graduates of 
the School of Pharmacy as they receive 
their diplomas. 

Upon presentation by the Nominat- 
ing Committee, Samuel Portney, Chair- 
man, the following were elected as offi- 
cers for 1960-61: Honorary President, 
Mrs. Frank M. Budacz; President, Irv- 
ing I. Cohen; First Vice-President, James 
P. Cragg, Jr.; Second Vice-President, 
Sam A. Goldstein; Executive Secretary, 
Dr. Frank J. Slama; Treasurer, H. Nel- 
son Warfield. 

Executive Committee: Victor H. 
Morgenroth, Jr., Chairman; Milton A. 
Friedman, John F. Neutze, Robert J. 
Kokoski. B. Olive Cole and Noel E. 
Foss are Ex-Officio Members. 

They were installed at the annual 
banquet on June 2, 1960. 

Candidates for the B.S. in Pharmacy 
and for graduate degrees were elected 
to membership. 

Joseph L. Muth was elected as an 
Associate Member of the Association. 

The Annual Alumni Banquet was 
held in the new Baltimore Student Union 
Building on June 2, 1960. following the 
Convocation of the School of Pharmacy 
in the new Library Building of the pro- 

{Continued on next page) 



• LUMBER 

• MILL WORK 

• BUILDER'S HARDWAR 
• PITTSBU RGH I'M NTS 

"Silver Spring's First Lumber Yard" 




SILVER ^|gpF S PR I NO 
BUILDING SUPPLY CO 



8226 GEORGIA AVENUE AT RIPLEY ST. 
JUniper 9-2300 SILVER SPRING, MI). 



J 


ohnston. Lemon & Co. 




MEMBER PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 




INVESTMENT SECURITIES 




SOUTHERN BUILDING 115 N. ST. ASAPH 




Washington 5, D. C. Alexandria, Va. 




STerling 3-3130 King 8-6600 



WASHINGTON PLY- RITE CO. 

Established 1924 

Waterproofing Engineers 

31 K St. S.E. LI 6-7900 

Washington, D. C. 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SUGRUE — PRES. 



NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY, Inc. 



SALES 



ubrd 



SERVICE 



8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



July-August, 1960 



45 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

ITS THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



15 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 
3°o Interest on Savings 

• 

Administration Building 

6495 New Hampshire Awe., 
Hyattsville. Md. 

HYATTSVILLE — SILVER SPRING 

JUniper 8-5000 Member F.D.I.C. 



Jfuller & b 'Albert 

INCORPORATED 



s yppiYlN<3 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 
Since 1920 



Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE =ee===e==== 
LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Ljour ~jrrienatu ^rtojts 

Just tight miles from Wrushintrton, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Phone AP 7-4493 
For Reservations 

Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 
7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLIDE PARK, MI). 



RESTORFF MOTORS 



Sal 



Service 



7373 BALTIMORE BLVO • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK. MD 



fessional schools Ol the University of 
Maryland. 

Parent! ol the graduates were espe- 
cially invited to attend the banquet of 
the Alumni Association on June 2, I960, 
and man) were present. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

(formerly College of Special and 
Continuation Studies) 

G. Allen Sager 



Jf 










^^r ''- 




fi 


i 




11 




I J 




j 


^~*\ 




L-— — -* — ' 



lt. col. turton, left, receives Legion of 
Merit award from Maj. Gen. Funk. 



Col. Turton Awarded Legion 
of Merit 

Lt. Col. John S. Turton. USAF. '59, 
has been awarded the Legion of Merit 
for exceptionally meritorious conduct 
in the performance of outstanding ser- 
vice during the period July 15. 1955 
to June I. 1959. Col. Turton is Deputy 
Director. Equipment and Installations. 
AMC Ballistic Missiles Center. Ingle- 
wood. California. 

Major General Hen I. Funk. Com- 
mander, San Bernardino Air Material 
Area, presented the award. 



PEPPERREl i Phases Out 

Mr. George J. Dillavou, Director of the 
Atlantic Division, announced that the 
University ol Maryland Program has 
been discontinued at Pepperrell Air 
Base. Newfoundland. The Air Base is 
being permanent!} closed. 



Helms Concrete 
Pipe Co. 

Alexandria, Va. 



CRUSTY 
PIE CO. 




Finest Uualily 

PIES— PASTRIES— DONUTS 

CAKES, DECORATED CAKES 

to take to the Sea Shore 

30 - O St., N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

ADams 2-7111 



WINDOW • ON • THE - KITCHEN 

KticLet&Ua 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food . . . All our desserts are 

home-mode popular prices 

no tipping . . . oir conditioned 

BREAKFAST • LUNCHEON 

DINNER Ouality Coffee 5c a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 

11th Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 

11th A E St» , N.W. Waihington. DC 



TOWER 9-6204: 



JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading: as 

KIERNAN'S 

.1 Complete Line of Beverages 
8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



46 



the Maryland Magazine 



The graduation ol throe military pel 
sonnel from Pepperrell in Maj marked 

a fitting climax to the program which 
had been offered there since 1951, when 

the Atlantic Division was established. 

The three graduates included the fol 
lowing: Major Eric O. Rodenhee. 
USArmy, Military Studies; Captain l>.m 
Edwin Dulaney, USAF, Military 
Studies; and (WO Edwin Ourward 
Dickerson. USAF. Cieneral Studies. 



Munich Branch Featured 

"Maryland's Campus in a Kaserne" was 

the title of a brief feature on the Munich 
Branch which appeared in the European 
Stars and Stripes. 

The photograph feature contrasted 
the traditional aspects of American col- 
lege life with the unique characteristics 
of life in the two-year program at the 
Munich Branch. 

Nearly 400 sons and daughters of 
U. S. military and foreign service per- 
sonnel, stationed throughout Western 
Europe, are students at the Munich 
daytime branch which is located in 
McGraw Kaserne. 



Drazek Elected to NUEA Board 

University College Associate Dean Stan- 
ley J. Drazek was elected to the Board 
of Directors of the National University 
Extension Association at its 45th An- 
nual Meeting in late April. He will serve 
from 1960-62. 

Dr. Drazek. who attended the four- 
day session in Chicago, was also ap- 
pointed chairman of the NUEA Com- 
mittee on Extension Services for the 
Armed Forces for the forthcoming year. 



Dr. Hallinan Reads Paper 

Dr. Timothy Hallinan, of the Far East 
Division, read a paper not long ago to 
a group of Korean scholars on the re- 
cent economic and social development 
of Europe and the Far East. His paper 
will be appearing in the first number of 
the Korean Journal of the Social 
Sciences and Humanities. 



Col. Skeath Completes Course 

Army Lt. Col. Elbur J. Skeath, "55, re- 
cently completed the six-week military 
comptrollership course at the Finance 
School, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indi- 
ana. Col. Skeath was trained to utilize 
the most up-to-date techniques and pro- 
cedures in the performance of comptrol- 
ler functions under the Army command 
management system. 

{Continued on next page) 



HARRIS & BROOKS, Inc. 



EXCAVATORS 



2413 Blue Ridge Ave. 



LO 5-0867 
LO 5-0868 



Wheaton, Md. 



JUniper 9-4580 



JUniper 9-3340 



A. MYRON COWELL, Inc. 

MASONRY- CONTRACTORS 

8416 Ramsey Ave. Silver Spring, Md. 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

Link Belt Company "Pyrene" & "MSA" Industrial 

Power Transmission • "C-0-TW0" • Gas Masks. Canisters 
Supplies Fire Extinguishers & First Aid Equipment 



2600 12th STREET. N.E. 



WASHINGTON 18, D. C. 



LAwrence 6-1362 



Thomas E. Claris Inc* 

PUwiuUiUf and <JfecUcna S&utiae 

AA2A Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 

WOodley 6-71 22 Day or Night, WOodley 6-5181 



TH0MSS0N STEEL CO., Inc. 

5106 Baltimore Avenue 
HYATTSVILLE, MD. AP 7-3201 



J uly- August, 1960 



47 



r/, 


e Shade Shop 


and 


AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 




2214 M Street, N. W. 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 




FEderol 7 1 200 : 


Manufacturers and Distributor! : 


• 


Window Shades 


• 


Venetion Blindj 


• 


Folding Doors 


• 


Draperies and Rods : 


• 


Screens : 


• 


Inside Shutters 


• 


Porch Shades 


• 


Vertical Blinds 


• 


Decorative Wood Coverings 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGN 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete 

AIR CONDITIONING. REFRIGERATION. 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 
MARYLAND. VIRGINIA AND 
WEST VIRGINIA 

Member A.R.W 

HO. 2-2600 

• WASHINGTON 9. D. C. 



U 01 M Airs "Opinion" 

I \cr\ Sunday morning a program goes 
on ihe air which requires the presence 
ol two lull-time stall members ot the 
University ol Maryland 

Ihe program is called "Opinion" and 
is offered through the Far Fast Network 
ol the Armed forces radio system. It 
is sponsored b\ the Far East Network 
and by the University ot Maryland's 
I .u I ,ist Division. It is considered per- 
haps the most popular public affairs 
program in the Far East. Many out- 
standing persons have appeared on the 
program including Mr. Burdick and 
Mr. Lcderer. authors of The I 'gly 
American; James Michener. Tennessee 
Williams, and Erskine Caldwell. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Marriages Among Nursing Ai i mnai 

Sarah Gayle Hamlen. '52. to Mr. Robert 
N. Gartside. on August 15, 1959. 

Kari Margaret Lcnning. "53. to Mr. 
Kenneth S. Schoening. on February 14, 
1959. in Greenwood. South Carolina. 

Mrs. Alma (Wilson) Clancey. '58, to 
Mr. Frank H. Collier, on September 21, 
1959. 

Ethel Horn. '50. to Captain in the 
Army Engineers, in 1957. 



Births to Nursing Alumnae 

To Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lee Morgan, 
a daughter, Amelia Ruth, on February 
7, 1956. And Charlotte Ariel, on Sep- 
tember 12. 1957. Mrs. Morgan was 
Charlotte Ariel Hager. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Hector Jimenez, a 
daughter. Laura Jean, on April 28. 

1958. And Sylvia, on November 25, 

1959. Mrs. Jimenez was Margaret M. 
Beede. '50. 

To Lt. and Mrs. Ben Nowland a son. 
Matthew Stephen, on October 15. 1959. 
They also have a son Michael. Mrs 
Nowland was Mary Benevicz. '55. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Andy Bittner. a 
daughter. Cathy, on December 7. 1959. 
Mrs. Bittner was Margaret Walter. '49. 

To Major and Mrs. W. Donald Hart- 
sock, a son. Daniel Lewis, on March 6. 
1959. They have three other children. 
Tom. eight years. Jim. seven, and Ann. 
five. Mrs. Hartsock was Nancy Jean 
Franklin. '47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hoover. 111. 
a son. Wesle] Clark, on October 19. 
1959. Mrs. Hoover was Joanne Clark. 
'47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James R. Young. 
a son. Charles Edward in September. 



£esuu*tq, iludetdi. and 
aLunni oj the 

35 IfeaM. 

tusTinE nicHoison 

Phil luitia* . . . 
head 9^ itolk co*nfia*ue4. 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



C. A. C0AKLEY 

Lathing & Plastering 
Contractors 



We are presently wording on 
Cambridge Hall on the Campus 
of the University of Maryland 



8248 Georgia Ave. JU 8-2552 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Druggist 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Oxer Half Century of Continuous 5V 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE CO. 



CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limestone 

Granite Marble 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 

Washington 18, D. C. 



48 



the Maryland Magazine 



1959. ITiej have three other sons, Ciil- 
mour, born in May. I l > s <>. limoth\ 
Paul, M.i\ l l >>7. and Ronnie, Junior, 
in June, 1958 MlS. Voung was N.mc\ 

Jo Kohlhoss, '53. 

1*0 Captain and Mrs. Moy On Chin, 
a son. Mark Alan, on September 12, 
1958. Mrs. Chin was Ethel Honi. '50. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Franklin J. Porter. 
Jr., a son. William Daniel, the past 
summer. (This is the third son.) Mrs. 
Porter was Catherine Reinhart, '54. 

lo Dr. and Mrs. William Fishbein, 
a girl in I960. Mrs. Fishbein was in 
the class of 1958. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Romon Nagorka, 
a boy, in February. l l )60. Mrs. Nagorka 
was Patricia Thayer, '57. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Fred Connelly, a 
girl. Julia Ann, on March 6, 1960. Mrs. 
Connelly was Nellie Pardew, '55. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Hector Ramirez, a 
daughter, Linda Ann, on March 24. 
1960. Mrs. Ramirez was Margerie Ann 
Rohwedder, '59. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George Kropinski. a 
daughter. Tammy, on March 23. 1960. 
Mrs. Kropinski was Patricia King, '59. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James Jones, a 
daughter, Lynne Reni, on March 17, 
1960. Mrs. Jones was Barbara Palmer, 
'58. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McEntire, a boy 
on January 4, 1960. Mrs. McEntire was 
Mary Lee Thompson, '54. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Fleming, 
a daughter. Cynthia Ann, on February 
29, 1960. Mrs. Fleming was Rebecca 
Anne Hamilton, '59. 

To Dr. and Mrs. George Lentz, Jr., 
a daughter, Pamela Ann, on February 
29, 1960. Mrs. Lentz was Shirley Jane 
Bramble, '56. 



Engaged 

Mr. and Mrs. Jess Brickman of 8400 
Hartford Avenue, Silver Spring, have 
announced the engagement of their 
daughter, Jill Barbara Brickman, to Mr. 
David Potter, an instructor in a District 
Elementary School, who is taking his 
Master's Degree at the University of 
Maryland. 

Miss Brickman is a freshman in the 
College of Education. 

A December wedding is planned. 



Weddings 

Vivian Lee Turner, A & S. '57, recently 
married Gershon Kekst, A. & S. '56. 
The couple now make their home in 
New York. 

U. S. Air Force 1/Lt. William G. 
Gorman, who completed the Bachelor 
of Science in Military Studies in Janu- 
ary, 1960, was married to Miss Fran- 
cine Ann Dicostanzo recently. The bride 
is from Melrose, Illinois. 



J. H. De VEAU & SON, Inc. 



General Contractors 



ROADS 






EXCAVATION 


DRIVEWAYS 






BUILDINGS 


PIPE 






CONCRETE 




CONCRETE 


SAWS 





4100 Jones Bridge Road 



North Chevy Chase, Md. 



McLeod &l Romborg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

— •— 

CUT STONE 

— •— 
Bladensburg Maryland 




BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"/became 2ualUy GotuiciauA" 

PLANT: 621-27 G STREET. N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVIUE, MD. WArfleld 7-0880 



WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 



HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Spring" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co. 



Clan 1928 

Insurance of all Kinds 

UNion 4-1100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



KIDUIEU & HIDUJEU, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 

WEbit.r 5-4500 MD. 



July-August, 1960 



49 




RETAIL & WHOLESALE 

1400 PRINCE ST. 

ALEXANDRIA, 
VA. 

TE 6-3260 



We 
DEVELOP LAND 

for 

its 
HIGHEST, BEST 

and most 
PROFITABLE USE 

for 
LAND OWNERS 

and 
INVESTORS 

HARRY A. BOSWELL CO., 

Inc. 

REALTORS 
3718 Rhode Island Avenue 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 
AP. 7-11 II 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE. MD. 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Haltimore-Washinelon Boulevard 

2 Mile- North — t'niversity of Maryland 

\\\ Duncan Hinos Ri'Mnurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Kree TV 

Room Phonal WE 5-6291 



BUY DEFENSE BONDS 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 




Dr. Cox 

Dr. Carroll E. Cox, Professor of Botany. 
died June 24 at the Prince Georges 
Hospital, following a long illness. 

Considered one of the University's 
outstanding lecturers. Professor Cox 
taught his first classes on the College 
Park campus in 1944. He joined the 
faculty as an Assistant Professor and 
reached the rank of full Professor by 
1950. He was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Delaware with distinction in 
1928, received an M.S. degree in 1940 
from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and the Ph.D. degree from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland in 1943. 

His professional affiliations included 
membership in the Botanical Society of 
America, American Physiological So- 
ciety. Washington Academy of Science, 
and President of the Botanical Society 
of Washington. 

In addition to his memberships in pro- 
fessional associations. Dr. Cox was a 
member of Sigma Xi and Phi Kappa Phi 
honorary fraternities. 

Devoted to his field, he was a prolific 
writer and editor of numerous symposia. 
Dr. Cox was a guiding light in the 
study of the physiology of fungi. He 
took time even in his final illness to 
conic to the Department of Botany to 
participate in the examination of one ol 
his students. 

Dr. Cox was active in the affairs of 
the community, serving at one time as a 
member of the College Park Town 
Council. He was Vice President of the 
campus Faculty Club and Chairman of 
the original committee which drafted 
the Faculty Plan of Organization. 

Dr. Cox is survived by his wife, 
Fli/abeth. and a son. Julian. 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

15710 Colesville Road 

SILVER SPRING. MARYLAND 



Ottenberg s Bakers, 

Inc. 

Quality Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 
INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHEONS 



u CHARCOAL' 

jmk J 



2fiS7 Conn. Ave. N.W., Washinirton, D. C. 



Bon Ton 
POTATO CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON FOOD PRODUCTS 

80". Franklin St., N.E. 
HU 3-4232 Washington 




Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



50 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. John C W i SS] I i 

Dr. John i Wessell, .1 graduate ol the 
Medical School, died recentlj al his 
home. He was 83 years old. 

Dr. Wessell was licensed to practice 
medicine in North Carolina in 1900. In 
addition to his private practice, he held 
the position of consulting physician and 
surgeon in the Atlantic (. oast I me Rail- 
road Co., was on the staff in tour hos- 
pitals, and was active in public health 
organizations. He was a director of the 
North Carolina Tuberculosis Associa- 
tion, a charter fellow of the American 
College oi Chest Surgeons, a member of 
the North Carolina and New Hanover 
Count) Medical Societies and the Amer- 
ican Trudeau Society. He was also the 
recipient of a bronze medallion issued 
by the National Tuberculosis Associa- 
tion. 

Dr. Wessell was a life-long Mason 
and a member of the Lutheran Church. 



James H. Kendrick 

Capt. James H. Kendrick died of a heart 
attack recently near his home in Los 
Angeles. The 32-year-old airborne in- 
fantry officer had retired from active 
duty in 1959, as a result of injuries 
received during an airborne operation 
at Fort Bragg. North Carolina, in 1957. 
Capt. Kendrick leaves his wife and 
three children. He is also survived by 
his parents. Mr. and Mrs. James C. 
Kendrick of Takoma Park. Md. 



Charles A. Neafie 

Dr. Charles A. Neafie. Med. "09. died 
of a heart attack recently at his home 
in Pontiac. Michigan. Dr. Neafie served 
the city of Pontiac as a physician from 
1912 until his retirement in 1952. For 
35 years he was the city's Director of 
Public Health. In 1956 he was awarded 
the Oakland County Medical Society's 
award for "distinguished service to med- 
icine." 



Other Deaths 

Dr. Simon J. Brager, Assistant Professor 
of Surgery at the Medical School, died 
of a heart attack recently at his home 
in Baltimore. He was 56 years old. 

Dr. Samuel Kraemer. Med. "30. died 
recently at his home in Jersey City. New 
Jersey. 

Mrs. J. L. McCormack ( Abigail C. 
Ryan, Nurs. "14 ) died recently. Mary 
G. Brady. Nursing "11. died last July. 

R. Grymes Wysong. Ed. "5 1 . died sud- 
denly on May 10. 1960. at Perry Point 
V. A. Hospital, Perryville. Md. He 
served in the U. S. Navy for four years. 
He made his home with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis Wysong of 636 
Rock Spring Ave., Bel Air. Md. 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Specialists in Residential and 
Commercial Air Conditioning 

Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

CALL US FOR THE NAME OF YOUR 
NEAREST DEALER 

YORK WHOLESALERS, Inc. 

(Wholesale Distributor) 

501 - 15th ST., SOUTH 
OTis 4-3700 Arlington, Va. 



FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT CO., Inc. 

— Since 1931 — 

Designers & Manufacturers of 

COMPLETE RESTAURANT, COMMERCIAL 

and INSTITUTIONAL KITCHENS 

Fabricators of Stainless Steel 
Service and Repair 

4908 Lawrence St. Hyattsville, Md. 

APpleton 7-3765 



ELECTRIC SERVICE COMPANY 

Registered Electrical Contractor 

Commercial - Industrial 



3136 N. lOSt. 



JAckson 8-1013 



ARLINGTON, VA. 











WALLOP 


and SON 




J. 


DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 


J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, 3rd 








Clas< 


of 1919 


Class of 1942 










—INSURANCE- 








Fire 


- Automobile • Life - 


Accident - Liability - Bonds 










EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 


1101 


VERMONT 


AVE., 


N.W.— Suite 405 


Executive 3-1400 WASHINGTON S, D. C. 



July-August, 1960 



51 



Directory of Advertisers 



5 



It. ili, l B Vffi I [m 

Inn 

Harrj A I! iswi II i ompanj 
I n 
luct Companj 

. 



a ipply Companj 

5 
I > Harrj ( hambei 5, < >pti( ians 
Bob Ching White Chimney Inn 
Thomas K (lark. [nc 47 

» A i oakley Lathing ft Plastering 
< ohn & Bock ( ompanj 40 

A Myron Cowell, I -u 47 

i ■ i« n ( >:! \ \\ .,\ i Company 

t rii>i\ Pie Companj 4,, 

■ i 'ushw a & Sons H 

tnpanj 

SO 
35 



I A Davis & Sons 
Del-Haven White II" 

J. H Dc\ - .. l,,c. 

Dietrich & GambriU, Inc. 
Dietrich Bros., Inc. 

Dinner Hell Inn & Motel 



1 inj 5 i 

Edwin E. Elletl Tile Companj 4J 



i Cooperative As 27 

J. II. Filbert, [nc .; . 

ft 1 tion 

Inside 1 
Equipment Co., Inc. 51 

Foreif Ltd 

IS 

■ ipany 
I • 
Fulli 



t 
I 

Hendli 



I Is 



8 I 
i - ft M 



Kidwell 8 Kidwell, [nc. 

The E. II. K •e-ter Ball 

Krispj Kieme Doughnut Company 



.1. Lang rail \ Bro., 1 ■ 
Lankford Hotel 
Maurice Leeser t ••tu- 
la, r.l Calvert Hotel 
Lustine Nicholson Chevrolet 



- Rc-taurant 

Mara lei Hotel 

The Martin Companj 

M iryland Hotel Supply Company 

Mason Canning Company 

Clifton D. Mayhew, Inc. 

Maj ii ..\ Citj i ouncil, Ocean City, Md 

F. O. Mitchell .V Bro., Inc. 

rn Machinist Company 
\l dei ■• Stationery t '■ i, 
McLeod ft Kan' 












■ 

36 
50 



30 
46 



24 
31 

_ : 
■ 

- 
31 

■ 
34 

40 



Natio • Cambridge 

National Equipment & Suppl 
Norman Motor C impanj 
North Washington Press 

North Wil 



1 
Olnej Inn 

Equipment Company 
Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc. 






■ 
Penn 

K B. Phelps v : 
Phillips' Crab II mse 

tli •• 8 Kennedy, 

.limn: [A k:el' 



41 



IS 

48 
30 
30 



1 



s 

m t.: 

SchludV 

- tmenti 

spinner, Realtor 

- 
Hill Sai .\ Gravel ' 
Silver Spring Bui - mpany 

Russell W. Smitl 

Smith'- !i...k Star 

Smith We! 

Southcomb, Inc. 

South 

Spanish Main Motel 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 

Stcrlii . 

Students Supply Store 
Suburban Trust Companj 

Suartz. Furs 
Sweetheart Uaker- 



Thomas & Thompson Company 
Thompson Furniture Companj 
Thomsson Steel Compai 
Tidewater Inn 

Town Hall ! 
The Ton a 11 use 









46 



43 

40 



Vermont Federal S 1 36 

Realtj Company .>J 



ince 
Washii 

-ale Back ' 
\\ - -.• Ply-Rite Companj 45 

Washington Wholesale Drue Exchange. Inc. 
I. I W inj. Inc. 

Western Exterminating Co., Inc. 
\\ estii ghi use Electric I 
Westward, Ho (Motel ft A] rti nts 
Terry O. Wilkinson 

Carl J. William- ft Sons -> 1 

.1. McKennj '■'■ 
W - Fertilizer ( 

U : Wide Tr 
Wye I 



Building Products Company. Inc. 
\\ l< sal< - -. Inc. 



rant 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FO OT B A L L - 1 9 6 



HOME GAMES 

Texas — Sept. 24 

Duke — Oct. 1 

(Band Day) 



DON'T BE DISAPPOINTED 
ORDER SEASON TICKETS NOW! 

for 

A preferred seat for 

EVERY GAME ! 



HOME GAMES 
Clemson — Oct. 15 

(Parents Day) 

S. Carolina— Oct. 29 

(Homecoming) 



It is our policy to fill applications for season tickets first. 

SEASON TICKETS— FOUR HOME GAMES, $16.25 

(Make check payable to UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND.) 

Additional tickets for individual games will not be adjacent to season ticket seats. Over-the-counter sale begins 
September 1 . 

1. Please make payment by check or money order, payable to University of Maryland, and Mail to Ticket 
Office, Box 295, College Park, Md. Do not send cash. 

2. Due to volume of mail at this particular time of year, it is regretted that acknowledgment of applications 
cannot be made. Tickets will be mailed as soon as possible. 



NAME (print) 
ADDRESS 



LAST 



FIRST 



INITIAL 



NO. 
TICKETS 


GAME 


DATE 


PRICE 


AMT. 
ENCLOSED 


OFFICE RECORD 
Home 




SEASON— All Home Games— 1960 




$16.00 








HOME GAMES 2:00 P.M. 












Texas 


Sept. 24 
Oct. 1 


4.00 








Duke — Band Day 


4.00 








Clemson — Parents Day 


Oct. 15 


4.00 








South Carolina — Homecoming 


Oct. 29 


4.00 








AWAY GAMES 












West Virginia — Morgantown 


Sept. 17 


4.00 








*N. C. State— Raleigh 


Oct. 8 


4.00 








*Wake Forest — Winston-Salem 


Oct. 22 


4.00 








Penn State — University Park, Pa. 


Nov. 5 


4.00 








North Carolina— Chapel Hill, N. C. 


Nov. 12 


4.50 








Virginia — Charlottesville, Va. 


Nov. 19 


4.00 






*Night Game Insurance and Postage 


.25 




— NO REFUNDS— Total Amount Enclosed: 


$ 


ORDER RECEIVED 



SUPPORT YOUR TEAM! 



m 



S> £ r- 
c .. J 1 

(0 » 



• * ause...have a Coke 



to 

w 



Tee off refreshed 






(0 




BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA COLA COMPANY BY 



WASHINGTON COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 




magazine 




Volume XXXI Number Six • September-October 196C 



Expanding Educational Opportunities • A Triumph in Puerto Rico 



How Western Electric Helps to Keep 
Down the Cost of Telephone Service 

There are great benefits for telephone users in the fact that 
the Bell System has its own manufacturing and supply unit 



J. la- Western Electric Company is 
.111 integral part of the Hell System 
—an essential member of the Bell 
System team serving you. 

You get some idea of Western 
Electric's job when yon consider this 
amazing requirement: Western must 
be ready at all times to produce and 
deliver to the Bell telephone com- 
panies 200,000 different kinds of 
apparatus and parts for telephone 
equipment. 

The quantity of these items varies 
over an astonishing range in any year 
— from one to many millions! 

Western Electric's specialized 

skills and experience are big assets, 
of course, in doing the best and most 
dependable job at the lowest cost. 
But they would be far less effective, 
and might not have been developed 
at all, if Western Electric were not 
a jxi rt of the Bell System. 

In no other way could it work so 
closely with the research of the Bell 
Telephone Laboratories and the 
needs of the Bell operating com- 
panies. The common goal is the 
betterment of telephone sen ice. 

Without Western Electric econo- 
mics, the price of your telephone 
service would surely be more and 
the quality less. 

For the sa\ ings that Western 
Electric Company has achieved in 
manufacturing have played an im- 




WESTERN ELECTRIC is the manufacturing and supply unit of the Rcll System. More than 
47,000 (if its 129,000 employees have been with the company for over ten years. I " 
for more than twenty five years. Their experience is one of the company's greatest assets. 



portant part in offsetting some of 
the increases in other costs of pro- 
viding service. Many of these in- 
creases have been clue to inflation 
and are beyond our control. 

Helpful in Defense 

Because of the capabilities that 
Western Electric has developed to 
do its telephone job, the U. S. Gov- 
ernment has called upon it for a 
number of military projects. 

We are proud of this recognition 
of the Bell System, and look upon 



these projects as a contribution to a 
great national effort. Serving the 
public is our job. But serving the 
nation is our duty. One grows out 
of the other. 

The value of the close integration 
of Bell System research, manufac- 
ture, operation and supply has been 
proved by many vears of successful 
operation. 

No other way would work out 
nearly so well or so economically for 
both the public and the country. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




Maryland 




The Cover: With tus squads top-hcavj with sophomores (then an 
of them), lom Nugent, optimistic as usual, believes he has .1 ison 

ahead. One of the biggesl problems he says, \mII be "to minimize t he 

errors our young boys might make- and to capitalize on OUI assets in 
talent and schooling." Some of the powerful teams that the leips will 

face this year are rexas, Duke. Clemson and Penn State. 



the 




SEPTEMBER (iCIUKI R • IW) 



magazine 

Volume XXXI 

Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. EWING TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C.WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



Number 6 



In This Issue- 



FEATLRES 

2 
3 
6 
10 
13 
15 
16 
17 
18 

NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

28 
30 
35 
38 
40 
46 
50 
51 
53 
55 
56 
58 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 

ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICERS OF THL Ai MATIOrj 

MRS. ELIZABETH ROH '',rj. -47. President 

DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '1 1, Vice-President 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, Vice-Prevdent 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICE of ALUMNI H! LATION8 

DAVID t . BRIGHAM, Dirr.r.t,,r 

ADVERTISING DIREC TOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N. W. 
Baltimore 18 Md. Washington, D. C. 

fHO 7-9018) 'FE 7-2113) 



The Alumni Diary 

Alumni and Campus Notes 

Expanding Educational Opportunity in Maryland 

A Triumph in Puerto Rico 

New Regent, Administrative and Faculty Appointments 

Your Alumni Council Officers 

Do You Remember? 

Maryland Books and Authors 

University Sports 

Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Dentistry 

Education 

Engineering 

Home Economics 

Law 

Medicine 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

University College 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post OfR 
College Park, Md.. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
,om »nn ,», „.„_ Fiftv cents the codv— Member of American Alumni Council. 



1,11 (,| \l 1 MM ( 01 N< II 

s, //, •'/// '■' 

I w \ / tin I 5 

4i, * I 

M M ( nrroll 
Paul \i Galbrealh 
Howard I Stier, 

( hurlea I El linger, ; ^ 

John l I ampe, 

I), Reginald \ Imiii. '14 

ILK IBHINIITII 

l homas l Bourne )i 
Ralph v\ I rey, lr., '41 
( hesiei \\ rawney, "31 

I ), Samuel Bryanl 
I) Harry I evin, '2f> 
Di t au.ua i) Stone, "25 

( i. ii. i Dixon, ' 14 

1 1. H rj Hasslinger, '33 

I or en i ee i indlej 

I s, ,. I s, I I HIM, 

I mmetl I oane, '29 
Robert J Mel eod, '37 

John I Waldo, "57 

II ii M l ttCONUUICI 

Mrs 1 m. i K ( hapman, "34 
Mis Kiuh I ( larke, '42 
Mis lane M West, '40 

i non H Niles, "17 
I ayman J. Redden, '34 
G Kenneth Reiblich, '2 l > 

Ml nil ini 

Dr. I Illusion R. Adams. '34 
Dr. Daniel I. Pessagno, 70 
Dr. William H. Triplet!. 'I I 

MBMNIl 

Mrs I Elizabeth R. Hipp. 29 

Mis Noi in. i s I ong, '49 

Mis Elizabeth R. Singleton, "47 

Pit ARM M 1 

Hyman Da\ idov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
I iank I. Slama, '24 



EX Oil U IO MEMBERS 

Dr. Wilson ll. Elkins 

President <»/ the I nix ersily 
David I Brigham, '38 

Sex retary- 1 reasurer 
\ icloi I lolm. '57, l.v.v'/ Sex retary 
Ham A. Boswell, Jr., '42. Past President 
I i .ink Block, '24. I'ast President 
Joseph II. Deckman, '31. I'a\i President 
I Gilberl Prendergast, '33, Past President 
I Homer Remsberg, 'IS. Past President 
Col. O. II. Saunders, '10, l'<m President 
Dr. Albert I Goldstein, '12 

l'd\i President 
T. I. Speer, '17. Past President 
( V Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Aiihui I. Bell, '19, Past President 



w ( mm ( 1 1 ii in phi \i \ i i//i / s 
Baltimore— David W. Bien, '2 l > 
( ai roll ( ounly — 

Dr. Lawrence I Leggett, '30 
Cecil County — Dr. I red S I ink. '56 
( umberland— Retard Aldridge, "25 
I astern Shore — Oiis Twilley, '21 
I redei ick County — 

lames I . /iminei man. '37 
M ( luh (ieorge Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Roberl W. Ik-all. '31 

England — George Kerlejza, "25 
New , ) oik Harold McGay, '50 

Noi lh I aslei n Shore — 

Robert W. Downes, Jr., '46 
Overseas— Col. Ralph I. Williams, '33 '41 
Pittsburgh — Dr. loseph I inegold, '34 
Prince ( ieorges ( ounty — 

i , 1 1 I . ringley, 27 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectadj Mis lanice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W Stevens, '19 
i s DepL of Agriculture — 

Wilham ll Evans, "26 
Washington Count} — 

( s^ott Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



Wl l ( i All hum I . . . II is I l Ml tGAIN TO EXTEND THE HOMECOMING INVITATION 
and to tell you how sincerely each alumnus is wanted on this particular 
dav. We hope vour desire to return is as great as our desire to welcome you back. 

Welcome I ionic carries so many different meanings that each must find the 
warmth ol the two words through his own experience. We can recall it as the 
greeting to a youngster returning from his first day at school, the first return for 
a college vacation and the reception following a tour of duty in the military 
service. It includes the open arms ol a child, a fireplace and the aroma which 
signifies the best in home cooking. Admittedly, the scenes of childhood, just as 
later college experiences, are viewed with nostalgia through the rose colored glasses 
which are so much a part ol passing time, maturity and memory. 

Our invitation, our activity, and our responsibility are best summarized by the 
story of the mountaineer during the days of the Tennessee Valley Authority 
development. Through negotiation, the exercise of the right of eminent domain, 
and condemnation, almost the entire land area behind one of the great new dams 
had been acquired. One little tract with its log cabin remained. Persuasion, court 
action and even the threat of forceful eviction failed to budge the occupant who 
sat in the doorway ol his home with his squirrel rifle across his knees. Finally, in 
desperation, a local preacher was sent to represent the government He offered 
more money and a new home in another section. The mountaineer expressed no 
interest in a better settlement, greater opportunities or even a modern home. The 
unexpected answer came as he pointed to his fireplace and said. "If the government 
can move my fireplace without letting the fire go out. I am ready. I promised my 
ancestors I would always keep their tire burning." 

So it is with those oi us at the University who say welcome home. Our 
responsibility is to keep the tires of our heritage, tradition, and memory and 
opportunity burning brightly. We know a portion of the fuel we provide must 
be in the form oi progress, development and construction. The campus must 
change as physical facilities are altered and expanded so many more young 
minds may be developed. At the same time, it is our hope that you will always 
feel the warmth oi the welcome that awaits you at the Universit) ol Maryland 
as you remember and knew it. 

Embodied in the immediate invitation to come back for another Homecoming 
is the urgent desire to recall for you those occasions and locations which you 
remember with the greatest enthusiasm. In the same view we would present to 
you an expanded campus in which you can have justifiable pride. Some oi the 
old landmarks are gone but manv remain as the magnet to draw you back. We 
to whom the privilege of "keeping the tire burning" has been given, once again 
sav welcome home. 

WELCOME HOME — OCTOBER 29. 1960 

As ever. 




#hs{__^ 



David L. Brigham 

Alumni Secretary 



The M a r y i \nd Magazini 




Housing Shortage Eased 

Faced with a housing shortage, and after 
consideration of a number of possibili- 
ties, the University of Maryland has 
found a partial solution for students who 
have been admitted to the University, 
but for whom there is no permanent 
housing. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of 
the University, has announced an ar- 
rangement for housing male students 
in a limited number of special prefabri- 
cated dormitory units. Eighty units, pro- 
viding for about 640 students, were 
ready for occupancy September 1, 1960. 
The State Planning Commission ap- 



proved the stop-gap measure to ease 
partially the University's housing short- 
age without the necessity of a special 
appropriation. The units will be self- 
liquidating and amortized within four 
to five years. 

The units are constructed of alumi- 
num exteriors and insulated wall panel- 
ing on the interiors, and are located 
near Fraternity Row. Each unit, provid- 
ing approximately 110 square feet of 
space, houses two men in each room, 
with complete bath facilities. 

President Elkins stated that the larg- 
est men's dormitory at College Park 
had been converted to a women's dor- 
mitory and was ready for occupancy 




an artist's conception of the new prefabricated dormitory units which will be erected 
on the University of Maryland campus for students who have been admitted to the 
University, but for whom there is no permanent housing. Center sketch shows one-half 
of a unit which will provide accommodations for four students. Lower left sketch shows 
a complete unit which will house eight students. Top right sketch shows exterior. 



in September. This has helped to ease 
the need for additional dormitory facili- 
ties for women. The 340 upperclassmen 
who would have been housed there were 
absorbed into the permanent dormi- 
tories. 

In a letter to parents of the men who 
live outside commuting distance, and 
who need housing, B. James Borreson, 
Executive Dean for Student I ife, said: 

"You have undoubtedly read of the 
University's acute housing shortage. 1 he 
number of qualified high school grad- 
uates who have applied for admission, 
and who require housing, has increased 
at a much greater rate than could be 
anticipated, even a few years back." 

Dean Borreson also explained how 
priorities were established in allocating 
the capacity of the permanent dormi- 
tories: (1) upperclassmen who had lived 
in the dormitories and who had done 
satisfactory academic work were as- 
signed space; (2) new students whose 
homes were more than 60 miles from 
the campus or whose daily commuting 
time exceeds three hours, were assigned 
housing (these were students who. in 
the University's judgment, might be de- 
prived of a college education h\ being 
deprived of housing): and (3) other 
new students were given housing on the 
basis of the date their application tor 
admission was received bj the Univer- 
sity. 

Dean Borreson assured the parents 
that "students who accept housing in 
the new prefabricated units will be 
given priority over all others when 
vacancies occur in the permanent dor- 
mitories during the year." 

Special efforts are being made to 
assist students who will not be accom- 
modated in arranging transportation to 
and from the campus in car pools. 



September-October, 1960 



\k( !artne> Heads Region 

I Met artney, Director ol Uni- 
ty Relations, has taken on regional 
ansibitities with the American ( ol- 
Public Relations Association Mr 
artney assumed the chairmanship 
ol the Mason-Dixon District on Septem- 
ber I. I 1 "'" His term is lor one year. 

Mr Met artnej has also served the 
organization in a national capacity He 
was chairman ol the l l ><>'i Honors ( om- 
petition Committee which arranged lor 
judging and display ot public relations 
projects Iroin hundreds ol colleges and 
Universities around the nation. 



Building to be Renovated 

I unds have been made available to the 
University ol Maryland which will be 
used lor renovating the building for- 
merly owned bv the Hecht Company 
and purchased by the University in 
[959. 

The grant of $795,350 bv the Surgeon 
General (to be matched by an equal 
amount from the Maryland General 
Assembly) will he of special value to 
the School of Medicine. Renovation of 
the building will provide more adequate 
quarters and expanded research facili- 
ties lor the medical departments. The 
School will be able to douhle its re- 



search program in hasic medical sci- 
ences. In addition, medical students in 
their lirst two vears will he enahled to 
have their own lahoratory space and 
equipment available at all hours. 

When the renovations are ultimately 
completed, the building will also house 
the office ol Physical Plant, the Depart- 
ment of Finance and Business, and 
other administrative units now located 
in University Hospital and other cam- 
pus buildings. 



Singer at NATO School 

Dr. S. Fred Singer participated as lec- 
turer on the subject "Structure of the 
Farth's Fxosphcre" at the NATO Sum- 
mer School on the Physics of the Upper 
Atmosphere held in the Castello Mim- 
belli on the Greek Island of Corfu last 
summer. 

The school, sponsored by the Science 
Adviser and Science Committee of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO), stands in a long and highly 
respected tradition of science in which 
experts in a particular field gather to- 
gether to study and exchange informa- 
tion about results of research in which 
they have individually participated. This 
school is different in that it is supported 
and financed by an international organ- 
ization. 




HOMECOMING 

Ol tober 29th Date Set 

I < rps Host 

South Carolina Gamecocks 

^s \ CLIMAX to IHh HOME FOOT- 
ball season. Homecoming Dav will 
be held on Saturday. October 29. 
Game time will be 2:00 P.M.. when 
Maryland will take the field against 
South Carolina. 

A full day is planned, including a 
very attractive buffet luncheon for all 
alumni, their families and friends at 
the Universitv Dining Hall. Build- 
ings of special interest will be open 
to visitors with the new dormitory 
construction and the partially com- 
pleted BPA building in the spotlight. 
There will be the usual outstanding 
house decorations, the Memorial 
Chapel with a Meditation period in 
the morning and the new Library for 
those who have not vet been through 
this excellent facility. 

At approximately 1:00 P.M. the 
Homecoming float parade will com- 
mence its tour of Byrd Stadium. This 
will be concluded by the crowning 
of the Homecoming Queen just prior 
to the football kick-off. 

Following the game, the alumni 
reception and Coffee Hour will be 
held in the Student Union Building. 
The annual Homecoming Dance will 
conclude the day. 

Additional details are being sent 
alumni through the Alumni Office at 
College Park. For reservations and 
information, call APpleton 7-5745 or 
address your inquiry to the Alumni 
Office. College Park. Maryland. 



no> s state, sponsored h\ the Maryland Department of the American Legion, convened 
on the College Park campus Jane 2 n -24. The 230 hoys attending donated their shirts 
lor Chilean relief Shown <is they gathered the shirts together are. I. to r.. Daniel R. 
Pearson from Princess Anne, Mayor of Maryland City; Kenny Rice from Frederick. 
Mayor of Legion City; and Joseph P. Colly from Dundalk, Coventor of Boys State. 
With the I'oss is Daniel // liurkhardl. Adjutant. Department of Maryland. American 
'I. who was Director o' How S' 



University of Maryland Fund 

The Greater University o\ Maryland 
Fund office is now in the process of 
making plans for the 1961 program. 
As in the previous three campaigns, the 
general canvass will start in early 
spring. With the vast number of Mary- 
land alumni scattered all over the coun- 
try, the task of organizing a group large 
enough to conduct the canvass properly 
rests solely on the cooperation rendered 
by alumni. Contributions and work ot 
the alumni in the past have indeed been 
felt in every department of the Univer- 
sity. 

{Continued on page 2?) 



T 11 e M a r v i \ \ d Magazine 




YOU CAN AIM YOUR CAREER IN EITHER DIRECTION 

AT STROMBERG-CARLSON 



Division of General Dynamics 



. . .where a group of outstanding scientists 
and engineers are conducting both theoretical 
and applied studies in many aspects of the 
science of communications 

While our broad concern at Stromberg-Carlson is in the acqui- 
sition, transmission, processing, storage and display of com- 
munications data, ancilliary investigations — often seemingly 
remote — are carried on to enhance our basic understanding 
of the communications field. 

TO THE ADVANCED DEGREE CANDIDATE this fre- 
quently offers the opportunity, upon completion of his studies, 
to continue theoretical investigations initiated in thesis 
preparation. 

TO THE MAN WHO HAS RECENTLY RECEIVED HIS 
BS, it provides varied career choices: to work directly with 
experts on research projects; to participate in advanced devel- 
opment engineering concerned with the solution of complex 
systems engineering and equipment problems; to undertake 
the design of specific hardware which may involve the first 
practical utilization of new knowledge. 

AT ALL LEVELS, the opportunities for professional growth 
are exceptional, not only through concentration on work in 
advanced areas but through continual contact with able men 
trained in other disciplines. Informal consultation between 
engineers, physicists, mathematicians, psychologists and lin- 
guists is available on a day to day basis. Further, with scien- 
tists it is the aim of Stromberg-Carlson's technically-trained 
management to maintain the atmosphere of the academic 
world, encouraging discussion, publication of papers and par- 
ticipation in technical symposia. 



The list below indicates 
the range of work currently 
in progress. 

FIELDS OF RESEARCH ENDEAVOR 

Paramagnetic Resonance 
Thin Photoconductor Films 
Ferroelectricity 
Propagation and Coding 
Speech Analysis 
Bandwidth Compression 
Hydro-Acoustic Transducers 
Molecular Electronics 
Defect Solid State Physics 
Parametric Devices 
Tunnel Diode Logic 
Scatter Propagation Analysis 
Plasma Physics 

ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT & ENGINEERING 

ICBM Communications 

Electronic Switching 

Nuclear Instrumentation 

High-Speed Digital Data Communications 

Electronics Reconnaissance Systems 

Single Sideband Communications 

Synchronous Data Transmission 

ASW Techniques 

Machine Tool Automation 

Radio Data Links 

High Intensity Sound Generators 

Air Acoustics 

Shaped Beam Display Systems 

High-Speed Automatic Missile Check-Out Equipment 

Super-Speed Read-Out and Printing Equipment 

Electro Acoustics & Transducers 

Logic Systems 

Sound Systems 

RF Equipment 

Precision Hi-Fi Components 



For further information write to the College Relations Section, 
Engineering Personnel Department. 

MBERG-CARLSON 
a d, vis, on of GENERAL DYNAMI 

1450 North Goodman St., Rochester 3, New York 




September-October, 1960 



BLUEPRINT ^HftASsiOK 



OF 
FACULTIES 



IIKSi&ftSS 

SKllllSlil 



PLANNING 
*WITH ESTIMATE© 




i 



Expanding Educational 
Opportunity in Maryland 



Edwin Warfield, III 

Chairman, Governor's Commission to Study the 
Problem of Expansion of the University of Maryland 



BY JOINT RESOLUTION THE 1959 SESSION OF THE GENERAL 
Assembly of Maryland requested Governor J. Millard 
Tawes to appoint a Commission to study the expansion 
of the University of Maryland. The Commission reported to 
the Governor and the General Assembly in February 1960 and 
has distributed copies of its report to persons throughout the 
State in response to requests. 

The Commission is pleased to have this opportunity to pre- 
sent a brief account of its work and its recommendations in 
The Maryland Magazine for the information of alumni of 
the University. 

Expansion of higher education in Maryland has been under 
study because there is a clearly predictable increase in the 
number of students who will be seeking to attend college. 
During the next ten years Maryland college enrollments will 
grow as much as they have in all past history. Conservative 
estimates led the Commission to the inevitable conclusion 
that the number of Maryland students attending college will 
double by 1970 and will triple by 1980. 

These are not guesses that come about by adding many 
different possible trends. These predicted increases in college 
enrollment are based on the increased number of boys and 
girls who are now or soon will be attending our school systems, 



and the number who can be expected to graduate and attend 
college. These figures are valid, short of national or inter- 
national disaster. For example, slightly less than 30 percent 
of the Maryland residents who graduate from high school 
go on to college. The Commission did not go into the pre- 
diction that an increased percentage would go to college, 
although this is probable as the future unfolds. 

Of the approximately 25.000 Maryland citizens who are 
enrolled in colleges as full-time undergraduate students, 13,000 
are enrolled in Maryland public colleges, 4,000 arc enrolled 
in Maryland private colleges, and 8.000 are enrolled in insti- 
tutions outside the State of Maryland. While the Commis- 
sion's principal job was to look at the expansion of the 
University of Maryland, it quickly recognized that this must 
be viewed with full regard for all higher education in the 
State of Maryland. As citizens of Maryland — as persons who 
have resided for a long time in the State — the Commission 
members recognized the contributions being made by the 
public colleges and private colleges within the State. 

There is a wealth of material that is available from studies 
of higher education in Maryland and in other states. Under 
the leadership of Mr. Harry K. Hasslinger, of Prince George's 
County, and with the aid of Mr. Howard H. Anderson. o\ 



September-October, 1960 



Somerset ( ountv. ;irul l)r Walter Hastings. Jr.. of Dorchester 
County, .1 committee of the Commission reviewed prior 
reports on higher education in Maryland and brought this 
information to the attention of all of the members of the 
( Commission. 

In order to view the results ol studies in other states. 
Delegate Charles B. Huyett, of Washington County, aided by 
Mr. William I Wilson. Jr.. of Allegany County, reviewed 
many reports ol educational studies in other states and brought 
pertinent information to the entire Commission membership. 

In any projection of plans for expansion, it is important 
to examine cost. Under the leadership of Mr. Walter F. 
Perkins of Baltimore, and with the aid of Senator Edward 
O. Weant. of Carroll County, the Commission reviewed a 
number of careful and thorough analyses of costs of alternate 
plans that might be developed. 

Accurate predictions of the number of students to be 
expected were important to the Commission in order that it 
might lay plans for expansion. Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President 
of the University, served as Chairman of a committee to 
develop this information for the Commission. He was aided 
by Mrs. Dorothy Shipley Granger and Dr. Edward F. Cotter 
of Baltimore. 

In preparing the report of the Commission, and in bringing 
this information to the attention of the public. Senator Edward 
O. Weant. of Carroll County, and Delegate Joseph D. Tydings, 
of Harford County, worked with various other members of 
the Commission. 

The Commission reviewed the possibility of recommending 
that all University expansion of undergraduate work take 
place at College Park, and in the process found that a large 
proportion of the total costs would be in the construction of 
dormitories and dining hall facilities. The Commission found 
that total costs for a boarding student vary from $7,000 to 
$8,000 in capital improvement investment, and that half 
of this cost is for living and dining facilities. There developed 
a very serious question in the minds of the members of the 
Commission — whether it would be wise to call for such large 
expenditures for living facilities and for the annual mainte- 
nance costs of these facilities, or whether it would be better, 
with the same total expenditure, to develop twice as much 
in the waj of academic facilities for students who can com- 
mute to campus locations. 

The Commission reviewed the growth in undergraduate 
enrollment at the University from 1954 to 1959 and found 
ih.it total enrollment has increased 34 percent, or approxi- 
mate!} 7 percent each year. Further, the Commission found 



that the University, under a definite policy, had reduced the 
percentage of out-of-state students from around 32 percent 
to slightly under 20 percent. The increase in enrollment of 
students from Maryland had been 45 percent during the 
period 1954 to 1959, or an average of 9 percent each year. 

The Commission felt that in viewing needed expansion it 
was necessary first to reach agreement on the basic principles 
that would govern its deliberations and recommendations. It 
developed the following four major factors to be kept in mind 
continually in the course of its study: 



1. 

2. 
3. 



THAT EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES SHOULD BE MADE 
AVAILABLE TO EVERY MARYLAND CITIZEN ON AS 
EQUITABLE A BASIS AS PRUDENT USE OF RE- 
SOURCES PERMIT. 

I II VT THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION IN MMO. I VM) 
SHOULD BE MAINTAINED CONTINUALLY AT A 
HIGH LEVEL. 

THAT COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTS SHOULD BE SI ( H 
AS TO ENCOURAGE THE FULL DEVELOPMENT OF 
ABLE STUDENTS AND TO ATTRACT HIGHLY QUALI- 
FIED FACULTIES, AND 

THAT ECONOMY OF EXPANSION AND OPERATION 
MUST BE MAINTAINED IN OBLIGATION TO THE 
STUDENTS AND TO THE TAXPAYERS OF MARY- 
LAND. 



The Commission reviewed high school graduate numbers 
in the various counties and Baltimore City, and the increase 
that can be expected during the next ten to fifteen vears. 
Approximately three-fourths of the potential college students 
in Maryland can be expected to come from Baltimore City, 
the urban areas of Baltimore, and from Prince George's 
and Montgomery counties. The Commission felt, in viewing 
these figures, that the people of Maryland would continual]) 
realize the importance of serving the entire State, and the 
importance of developing a plan that would give a better 
opportunity to attend college on a commuting basis to students 
throughout the State. 



A. 



.S A Kl SI I I Ol PHE INNNMVI STUDY. I HI COMMISSION 

concluded that the expansion of the Universit) of Mary- 
land should emphasize the development of a network of 
four-year colleges that could serve large numbers of students 
on a commuting basis, and that could olfer students the 
opportunity: 



8 



The Maryland Magazine 



to prepare for teaching in the elementary or secondary 
schools; to take those courses that would lead to a 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in the 
general area of arts and sciences; and to take all of the 
essential courses of the first two years of college so as 
to transfer to highly specialized courses in the junior 
and senior years in such areas as agriculture, home 
economics, and engineering. 



The Commission concluded further that these colleges 
would need to reach reasonably sizeable enrollments in the 
foreseeable future if they were to be economically constructed 
and operated — enrollments nearing 1,000 students and prefer- 
ably higher. 

In studying Garrett and Allegany counties, it was apparent 
that if a new center were developed, both the existing Teachers 
College in Frostburg and the new center would be too small 
for economical operation. For the southern Eastern Shore 
it was clearly apparent that the existence of the State Teachers 
College in Salisbury and Maryland State College in Princess 
Anne meant no new college was needed. It was also clearly 
apparent that the State Teachers College in Salisbury was 
ideally located to serve more broadly the needs of the area. 

With reference to serving the northern part of Baltimore 
City and the counties to the north of Baltimore, the State 
Teachers College in Towson has an ideal location near the 
new beltway that is partially developed and which when 
completed will allow rapid movement from the major traffic 
arteries that serve the area. As a university center. Towson 
could be expected to grow very rapidly. 

In serving Prince George's and Montgomery counties and 
the area immediately south of Baltimore, College Park is 
located ideally with respect to the large and rapidly increas- 
ing number of Maryland high school graduates, and no new 
four-year center is needed. 

In view of the entire study, the Commission recommended 
that the first phase of an expansion program be the combina- 
tion of the educational resources which the State has estab- 
lished at the State Teachers Colleges in Frostburg, Salisbury, 
and Towson, and at the University of Maryland in College 
Park. 

The Commission recommended a second phase that would 
be the establishment of similar centers to serve three other 
regions of the State that do not have public four-year insti- 
tutions. These would be centers located in the central or 
northern part of the Eastern Shore, in Southern Maryland, 
and in the Washington and Frederick County area. 



I he Commission fell that the combination ol the teachers 
Colleges and the University should he accomplished and in 
operation before the second phase was undertaken. 

In viewing the total number of students who could be 
expected to attend college in Maryland, the Commission pro- 
jected the enrollments that would be expected il its recom- 
mendations were placed into effect, and projected that there 
would continue to be rapid growth in the junior colleges 
and in the other public colleges in Maryland. To be sure 
that the projections of the Commission would not in any 
manner neglect the fact that private institutions could abo 
be expected to grow, the plan of the Commission avoided 
including those students who might be expected to attend 
the private institutions in the State should they choose to 
expand in relation to the increased number of students who 
are seeking to enter college. 

The Commission has estimated that the entire expansion 
program for the ten-year period ahead, including the con- 
struction of the necessary facilities for undergraduate work 
at College Park, the additional facilities for expansion ot 
the State Teachers Colleges in Frostburg. Salisbury, and 
Towson, and for the establishment of three new centers, 
will cost approximately $49,000,000. Approximately $15,500,- 
000 would be needed to properly prepare for the 9.600 addi- 
tional students who would come to College Park; $13,000,000 
would be needed for the 5,200 additional students who could 
be expected to enroll at Frostburg. Salisbury, and Towson. 
and $9,800,000 would be needed for the 2.400 additional 
students who might be expected to enroll in the three new 
centers. In studying the dormitory needs, the Commission felt 
that a total of approximately $10,700,000 would be needed 
during the period for dormitories to serve College Park. 
Frostburg. Salisbury, and Towson. These dormitories would 
house students too far from the center for commuting. The 
Commission did not feel that the new four-year centers 
should be planned to include dormitories. 

In reviewing the entire situation, the Commission felt that 
if its complete plan were adopted, the cost for facilities per 
student would be slightly lower than if this entire expansion 
were undertaken at College Park. 

Widespread attention has been given to the recommenda- 
tions of the Commission and many expressions of support 
have come from groups throughout Marvland who feel that 
the recommendations are sound and in the best interests of 
higher education. 

Copies of the full report of the Commission are available 
for distribution. I should like to encourage all persons who 
are interested to request a copy by writing to me at Box 1674. 
Baltimore 3. Marvland. 



September-October, 1960 






A Triumph in Puerto Rico 



GK Wli. M vssl\ I . I'KI ( ISI \sn M UAII [< ENT WERE WORDS 
used to describe performances of the University Chapel 
( bob" .it the international Festival Casals staged this summer 
in San J nan. Puerto Rico. 

Accompanied bj Director Fague Springmann and personnel 
ol the Department of Music, the specially picked choral 
group spent a week on the island commonwealth rehearsing 
and performing Brahms'. German Requiem. Haydn's. The 
Seven Lasl Words ol Christ, and Beethoven's Choral Fantasy. 



At its first rehearsal more than 100 University of Puerto 
Rico students heard drifting through the campus in the morn- 
ing the powerful voices singing over the 65-piece Festival 
Orchestra, and dropped in at the University Theater to find 
out how some 200 persons plus the orchestra could fit on 
their small stage. They were surprised to find less than half 
the number of singers they expected, and the\ stayed to hear 
the swelling tones of Fague Springmann. as he sang the solo 
baritone part of Brahms* Requiem. 



^ mi UNiVERsm chapei choir in rehearsal, Pablo Casals conducting. 




The beach at La Concha Hotel, where the group stayed, 

is one of the newest and most inviting in San Juan and was 
entertaining enough by itself tor the group's first day. Many 
practiced their college Spanish with bell bins, some stuffed 
themselves on fresh pineapple, while others viewed the city 
from the tenth floor Mirador Room. The hotel bill, and 
other trip expenses, was shared by the Festival, the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, and the Cireater University of Maryland 
Fund. 

Following the Saturday morning rehearsal, almost every 
choir member could be found at the beach or around the 
swimming pool. Soloist Fague Springmann even sat on the 
beach for a short while, but stayed out of the water to pro- 
tect his voice. Later in the day, he returned to his room to 
spray his throat before the evening performance, which 
music enthusiasts described here as "faultless." 

Of his performance as soloist, the newspaper El Mundo 
said: "This baritone possesses a voice imposing in power, 
rich in color and deeply emotional in expression." 



kJ PRINQMANN, PROFESSOR "I MUSK M MARYLAND I < >K 

eight \ears. left alter the I estiva! fol London where Ik 
recorded ten American Negro spirituals with the London 

Symphony, following a whirlwind tup on to German) and 

Spain, he returned to New York to perform .it the 1 inpire 
Slate Music Festival at Bear Mountain State Park. He then 
returned to College Park, to begin preparations tor the choir's 
next school year. He has scheduled seven major works lor 
the group next season. 

A man who made his debut in Carnegie Hall nine \ears 
ago, Springmann has been a soloist with the Telephone Hour 
on television. When he performed the German Requiem in 
San Juan he thought, as he confesses he always thinks dur- 
ing this work, of his eight-year-old daughter who died last 
year of leukemia. A former National Red Cross Girl ot 
America, she was kept alive on more than 200 blood trans- 
fusions. 

During rehearsal and performance sessions, most eyes were 
kept on the choir's conductor. Dr. Hugh Ross. Last year, he 







^4 



' 



'.-} 




Uik 

directed the orchestra lor the opera La Boheme at the Lyric 

I he.iter in Baltimore. In 1957, he inaugurated the National 

( horns ol Amenta established h> the U S Brewers Founda- 
tion with a concert in Baltimore. He has aKo been guest 

COndtlCtOI lor the University choir in several cities on numer- 
ous occasions. 

He is besl known, however, for his Schola Cantorum 
choral organization in New York c ity. He has had the group 

tor 10 ol its 50 years ot existence W ith Leonard Bernstein, 
he has performed on "Star Time," a network television show 
from New York. 

During the rehearsal with orchestra. Ross stopped and 
started his 140-member aggregation over and over again. 
A hard task-master, the former Englishman snaps with a 
voice something akin to that of Cyril Richard. "Strings — F 
is a torte and not a fortissimo; not a fortissimo!" 

During the more forceful passages, the rehearsal audience 
and the orchestra were startled and fascinated with his antics 
— rocking up and down on his toes and throwing his fist 
toward a section ot the chorus he wants to direct. Turning 
to the orchestra, he illustrates rhythm and "punch" some- 
times by thrusting his finger at them in time to the music. 

After the first rehearsal, he was complimented by mem- 
bers of the orchestra, both for his control and for the quality 
of the choir itself. He received these while mopping his brow 
for. though the theater is air-conditioned. Ross had worked 
himself up into a mezzoforte sweat. 

In spite of making such hard work out of it, Ross explained 
here that he always enjoys conducting the Chapel Choir. Be- 
cause so many of its members are voice majors, he says, 
they approach being a professional crew of young ladies 
and gentlemen — "verj superior for a college chorus." He 
explained, too, that very few student groups could hope to 
sing above a full-size orchestra such as this one. 

The entire Maryland contingent were the guests of the 
University of Maryland Alumni chapter in Puerto Rico at 
a special luncheon in the San Juan Intercontinental Hotel. 
Chairman for the occasion was Dr. J. R. Rolenson. a 1916 
graduate of the University's Medical School in Baltimore. 

World-famous artists who appeared on the Festival pro- 
gram were Andres Segovia, guitarist: Mieczysalaw Horszow- 
ski. pianist, and the Festival Casals Director, Pablo Casals, 
conductor and cellist. 

Topping the list of memories of their island visit will 
be the recollection bv members o\ the choir of hours of re- 
hearsal and performance under such distinguished conduc- 
tors as Dr. Hugh Ross. Alex Schneider, member o\ the Buda- 
pest String Quartet, and associate conductor for the Festival; 
and. oi course, the Maestro himself — Pablo Casals. 

Worth reading to their grandchildren will be the review 
in T.I Minnie which said, "the tenth concert (the choir's per- 
formance ot the German Requiem) will go down in historv 
as the most brilliant of the Fourth festival, and possiblv 
ol all the Festivals . . . the directors have brought us a mag- 
nificent chorus ot wide vocal resources, excellent balance 
and admirable discipline " 



.^t Alumni hosts to members of the Chapel Chair. 
^^ I r, mi left: Drs. J. H. Rolenson, Miguel Alonso 
mill Manuel RodrigUt . 




The Choir's spirited arrival, above, is in sharp 
contrast to its exhausted departure, pictured below. 




12 



T h i M a r v i \ \ n Magazim 



New Regent, Faculty Appointments 

Mr. Case Appointed, Mr. Brown Reappointed to the Board of Regents: 
Dr. Hornbake Appointed Vice President for Academic Affairs 



Richard W. Case 

Member, Board of Regents 

RICHARD W. CASE, BALTIMORE ATTORNEY AND ONE OF 
Governor Tawes' chief advisers on taxation and fiscal 
matters, has been appointed to the University of Maryland 
Board of Regents. He succeeds Enos S. Stockbridge. 

An alumnus of the 1941 graduating class, Mr. Case earned 
his law degree from the University's Law School in 1942. 
As an outstanding law student, he was honored with member- 
ship in the Order of the Coif and served as Student Editor-in- 
Chief of the Maryland Law Review. From 1943-54, Mr. Case 
was a lecturer in federal taxation at the School of Law. Mr. 
Case presently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees 
of the Peabody Institute and of the Maryland School for the 
Blind. He is a partner in the law firm of Smith, Somerville 
and Case and a member of the Maryland, Baltimore and 
American Bar Associations. He has been prominent in recent 
years as a leader in governmental reorganization commissions. 

Mr. Case is married to the former Betsy J. Carson, Class 
of '43. 




B. Herbert Brown 

Member, Board of Regents 

REAPPOINTED TO THE BOARD OF REGENTS WAS B. HERBERT 
Brown, Baltimore educator and President of the Balti- 
more Institute. Mr. Brown has served on the Board since 
1951. 

Mr. Brown was Vice President of the University of Balti- 
more in 1941 when he resigned to organize and establish 
the Baltimore Institute. The Baltimore Institute is a coedu- 
cational school that offers preparatory, business and adult 
educational courses. 

Mr. Brown is an Associate Director of the Speedwriting 
Publishing Company and a member of the Advisory Board 
of the Steed College of Technology. He served two terms as 
President of the Maryland Association of Business Schools 
and as President of the Delaware, Maryland, and District of 
Columbia Association of Business Schools. He is the founder 
of the Dale Carnegie Course Sponsors' Association and served 
two terms as President of that body. 

Mr. Brown is married to the former Ann Oldham. They 
have one daughter. 

Both terms were effective June 1. The 1960 General Assem- 
bly revised the terms for Board of Regents members to a 
maximum of two consecutive seven-year appointments. 




September-October, 1960 



13 



Dr. Kin Hornbaki 
I /( c President for Academu Affairs 

Di< h LEI HORNBAKE, DEAN Ol I ill FACULTY, HAS BEEN 
ii the title ol \ icc President lor Academic Alfairs 

in iin.- Hoard oi Regents. 

I )i Hornbake, who came if the University ol Maryland 
in 1945, in eminent!) qualified as an educational administra- 
te! He received Ins M A and Ph.D. degrees from Ohio 
Stale I mveisitv and. in 1949, look a year's leave ol absence 

tor post-doctoral stud) in education and business administra- 
tion at Harvard I Diversity Appointed Head of the Industrial 
Education Department in 1954, he has been instrumental in 
developing a graduate program which attracts doctoral can- 
didates Ironi mam states. 

Di Hornbake was appointed Dean ol the Faculty in 1957. 
His duties as Vice President will be similar to those performed 
In the Dean ol the Faculty, with academic matters clearing 
through his office. 

At their June meeting, the Hoard also approved the appoint- 
ment ol Dr. Helen E. Clarke, University of California Assist- 
ant Dcau ol Students, as University Ol Maryland Dean of 
Women. Dr. Clarke will succeed Dean Adele Stamp, who 
will retire in November after 38 years of service at College 
Park 




Dr. Verl S. Lewis 

Dean, School of Social Work 

DR. VEBJ S. I I wis. \ PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL WORK AT THE 
Uni\crsity of Connecticut, has been appointed to head 
the University Ol Maryland's new School of Social Work. 

I he new professional program, which will be the only 
school ol social work in the State, was approved by Mary- 
land Governor J. Millard Tawes and by the State Legislature 
during the I960 session, following its presentation and support 
b) the University administration. It will be located on the 
Baltimore campus. 

During the coming year. Dr. Lewis will develop a cur- 
riculum leading to a master's degree in social work, recom- 
mend faculty for appointment, develop an internship with 
the established social agencies in Maryland, and initiate 
library holdings essential to the School. It is planned to have 
the first class enter in September 1961. 

President Elkins, commenting on the appointment of Dr. 
I ewis. said: 

"Dr. Verl S. Lewis is well qualified to organize and admin- 
ister the School ol Social Work, which is to be located on 
the Baltimore campus. During the current academic year, he 
will be engaged in employing a faculty, formulating a cur- 
riculum, and establishing working relationships with social 
agencies in Baltimore and other parts of Maryland. 

" I here has been considerable interest shown in the devel- 
opment ol these programs, and I am confident that Dr. 
lewis will find a cooperative attitude wherever he turns for 
assistance.'' 

\ native ot Miller. South Dakota. Dr. Lewis has had 25 
\ears of experience almost equall) divided between responsi- 
ble positions in social agencies and academic appointments in 
institutions ol higher education 

ntinued on page 1 1 ) 




14 



The Maryland Magazine 



Your Alumni Council Officers 



ELIZABETH ROHR SINGLETON 

ElIZABI III ROHR SINGLE ION HAS HI 1 N I II i III' PR] SIDENT 

of the General Alumni Council, the tirst woman over to 
hold thai post 

Mrs. Singleton served as Vice President of the Alumni 
Council last year and is a Past President of the Nurses 
Alumnae Association 

While a student at the School of Nursing, she held the 
Nurses Alumnae Association and Dr. Frank Marino scholar- 
ships. She was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in 1947, 
and a Bachelor of Nursing Education degree in 1951. She 
has done graduate work at the University of Maryland and 
Johns Hopkins University. 

Mrs. Singleton has been active professionally, serving at 
different times as Supervisor and Instructor of Auxiliary 
Personnel, University Hospital; Clinical Instructor, School of 
Nursing: and Director of Guidance and Coordinator of Stu- 
dent Personnel Services at the School of Nursing. 

In addition to her membership in the Nurses Alumnae 
Association, Mrs. Singleton is a member of the Maryland 
League for Nursing and the National League for Nursing. 
She belongs to the Maryland State Nurses Association and 
the American Nurses Association. 




Dr. Triplet! 



DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT 

T^\R. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, OF SOLOMONS, MARYLAND, 

has been elected Vice President of the General Alumni 
Council. 

Dr. Truitt has been associated with the University since 
1910 when he came here as an undergraduate. He received 
an A.B. degree in 1914 and earned an M.S. degree in 1920. 
He then continued his graduate work at American University 
where he was awarded a Ph.D. degree in 1929. Dr. Truitt 
also did post-graduate work at the University of Berlin. While 
continuing as a student in graduate work, Dr. Truitt was also 
working as a teacher at the University. Beginning as an 
instructor in 1918, he attained the rank of full professor in 
1926, a position he held until 1943. From 1943 to 1954 when 
he retired. Dr. Truitt served as Director of the Maryland 
Department of Research and Education. Dr. Truitt is the 
author of a large number of reports and articles and is a 
member of many professional organizations. 



September-October, 1 960 



75 




Mrs. Singleton 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT 

T"\R. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, A 191 1 GRADUATE OF THE BA] II- 

more Medical College, which later became the University 
of Maryland, will be serving his third term as a Vice President 
of the Alumni Council. He is a past president of the Medical 
Alumni Association and has served as its Executive Director 
since 1954. 

Dr. Triplett is a veteran of both world wars, serving with 
the Army Medical Reserve Corps in Europe during World 
War I and as surgeon of the 29th Infantry Division in World 
War II. 

Associated with the University of Maryland faculty since 
1924, Dr. Triplett has always taken an active part in Univer- 
sity and alumni affairs. In addition, he is active in all Masonic 
bodies and the American Legion. He has served as President 
of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States. 
He maintains an active interest in several wildlife and sports- 
man's organizations. 



/)/•. Truitt 



-~K 





i 




■ 







• - 



e 



r 



Do You Remember? 



Till \no\i PHOTOGRAPHS WERE MADE FROM A POSTCARD 
found in a bookstore in Hagerstown and lent by Frederick 
l)e Marr I he loot-ball team members have not been identified, 
but the writer ot the card is thought to be Paul Revere Little 
ot I unkstown, who was graduated from the University in 
l^ll and was last heard ol as Secretary oi the lions Club 
in l li